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Register today for the upcoming NIH Geroscience Summit!

Source: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2013/09/register-today-upcoming-nih-geroscience-summit

Will you join us in Bethesda, Maryland this coming October 30 and 31 to talk about aging research in a new way? The Trans-NIH Geroscience Interest Group (GSIG), with the support of the Alliance for Aging Research and the Gerontological Society of America, has organized a major meeting on aging as a risk factor for most chronic diseases. We hope you’ll be able to attend. The meeting is free and open to the public, but registration closes soon. Please register today to reserve your place!…

Source: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2013/09/register-today-upcoming-nih-geroscience-summit

Will you join us in Bethesda, Maryland this coming October 30 and 31 to talk about aging research in a new way? The Trans-NIH Geroscience Interest Group (GSIG), with the support of the Alliance for Aging Research and the Gerontological Society of America, has organized a major meeting on aging as a risk factor for most chronic diseases. We hope you’ll be able to attend. The meeting is free and open to the public, but registration closes soon. Please register today to reserve your place!…

What we’re doing while we wait…

Source: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2016/11/what-were-doing-while-we-wait

As many of you know, if you’ve been reading this blog, both the Senate and House appropriations committees separately have passed bills calling for large increases in funds to support research on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. In fact, we’ve used that advance information to prepare to receive these funds, should they come our way in final legislation. That’s why we’re in the process of publishing many funding opportunity announcements that will take advantage of these funds, and other funds we will have, once we know our final budget….

Source: http://www.nia.nih.gov/research/blog/2016/11/what-were-doing-while-we-wait

As many of you know, if you’ve been reading this blog, both the Senate and House appropriations committees separately have passed bills calling for large increases in funds to support research on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. In fact, we’ve used that advance information to prepare to receive these funds, should they come our way in final legislation. That’s why we’re in the process of publishing many funding opportunity announcements that will take advantage of these funds, and other funds we will have, once we know our final budget….

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria

Source: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/food-poisoning/news/20161118/bagged-salads-may-be-fertile-ground-for-bacteria?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Study found juices released from damaged leaves encouraged salmonella spread

Source: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/food-poisoning/news/20161118/bagged-salads-may-be-fertile-ground-for-bacteria?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Study found juices released from damaged leaves encouraged salmonella spread

When To Stop Asking Why

Source http://mentalitywod.com/11508/when-to-stop-asking-why/

IMG_2362-edit

“Know your WHY.” You hear myself and other leaders say it all of the time.

I encourage you to know your purpose behind doing whatever it is you’re currently doing. Before any event, important day or training session, I suggest you run through a few key reminders why it matters to you, why you want to give it your best and why you want to accomplish your goals.

The stronger your why, the stronger your will. The more connected you are with your purpose for doing something, the more likely you’ll pursue excellence in it. Your why matters.

But, there are also times when asking “why” is a flat-out waste of time. Searching for answers as to “why” something occurred can be a huge distraction, it can send you into a rut and it can paralyze to a point where you become inactive.

See continuing to ask yourself WHY you’re pursuing what you’re pursing is incredibly valuable.

But, continuing to search for why something has occurred (and beating yourself up over it, or staying down for wayyyy too long because you don’t understand how it’s possible) is not helpful.

Sometimes there aren’t clear answers for shit that happens. You get injured or sick….

Source http://mentalitywod.com/11508/when-to-stop-asking-why/

IMG_2362-edit

“Know your WHY.” You hear myself and other leaders say it all of the time.

I encourage you to know your purpose behind doing whatever it is you’re currently doing. Before any event, important day or training session, I suggest you run through a few key reminders why it matters to you, why you want to give it your best and why you want to accomplish your goals.

The stronger your why, the stronger your will. The more connected you are with your purpose for doing something, the more likely you’ll pursue excellence in it. Your why matters.

But, there are also times when asking “why” is a flat-out waste of time. Searching for answers as to “why” something occurred can be a huge distraction, it can send you into a rut and it can paralyze to a point where you become inactive.

See continuing to ask yourself WHY you’re pursuing what you’re pursing is incredibly valuable.

But, continuing to search for why something has occurred (and beating yourself up over it, or staying down for wayyyy too long because you don’t understand how it’s possible) is not helpful.

Sometimes there aren’t clear answers for shit that happens. You get injured or sick….

Finding Joy in the Face of Alzheimer’s: Richard Lui Talks Family & Long-Distance Caregiving

Source: http://blog.alz.org/finding-joy-in-the-face-of-alzheimers-richard-lui-talks-family-long-distance-caregiving/

We sat down to talk with Richard Lui, news anchor for NBC and MSNBC and long-distance caregiver for his father, who is living with Alzheimer’s. Every week, Richard travels coast-to-coast to be with his family.

Tell us about your father Steven’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis and how it came about.

luiwithfather

It began with a diagnosis of dementia. The interesting part is my Dad never had a great memory – it was something we joked about. However, what started to happen was much more extreme.

Dad is one of 13 children in his family, and at Christmas, his youngest sister Fannie pulled me aside and said, “I’m concerned, Steve is forgetting our names.”  He agreed he should get tested. This was about five years ago, and it resulted in a diagnosis of early signs of dementia. It w…

Source: http://blog.alz.org/finding-joy-in-the-face-of-alzheimers-richard-lui-talks-family-long-distance-caregiving/

We sat down to talk with Richard Lui, news anchor for NBC and MSNBC and long-distance caregiver for his father, who is living with Alzheimer’s. Every week, Richard travels coast-to-coast to be with his family.

Tell us about your father Steven’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis and how it came about.

luiwithfather

It began with a diagnosis of dementia. The interesting part is my Dad never had a great memory – it was something we joked about. However, what started to happen was much more extreme.

Dad is one of 13 children in his family, and at Christmas, his youngest sister Fannie pulled me aside and said, “I’m concerned, Steve is forgetting our names.”  He agreed he should get tested. This was about five years ago, and it resulted in a diagnosis of early signs of dementia. It w…

Gwen Ifill’s Death Puts the Spotlight on Endometrial Cancer

Source: http://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2016/spotlight-on-gwen-ifill-death-from-endometrial-cancer.html

As we bid farewell to Gwen Ifill, there is a renewed spotlight on endometrial cancer, which affects many postmenopausal women….

Source: http://www.aarp.org/health/conditions-treatments/info-2016/spotlight-on-gwen-ifill-death-from-endometrial-cancer.html

As we bid farewell to Gwen Ifill, there is a renewed spotlight on endometrial cancer, which affects many postmenopausal women….

How to Have a Stress-Free Holiday Eating Experience

Source http://www.fannetasticfood.com/how-to-have-a-stress-free-holiday-eating-experience/

I share a variation of this post on how to have a stress-free holiday eating experience almost every year, but it’s worth re-sharing because I know it’s something that’s on most of your minds right now, what with Thanksgiving coming up next week (and the December holiday extravaganza after that).

So – how do you enjoy the holidays in a way that embraces the deliciousness of the meals/parties but also leaves you feeling good, both physically and mentally? How can the holiday eating experience be joyful, not stressful?

stress free holiday eating

So many websites and magazine articles tell us how to avoid this and deny ourselves that around the holidays, turning situations that should be fun into stressful internal battles of will. I saw a couple blog posts recently recommending things like “weigh yourself every day!” or “wear your tightest clothes so you will be uncomfortable and won’t eat much!” or “avoid anything with cream!” or “only make/bring food you hate!” Seriously?! This is the advice being given out now? All things that will make people feel extremely guilty, unhappy in their bodies, and like food…

Source http://www.fannetasticfood.com/how-to-have-a-stress-free-holiday-eating-experience/

I share a variation of this post on how to have a stress-free holiday eating experience almost every year, but it’s worth re-sharing because I know it’s something that’s on most of your minds right now, what with Thanksgiving coming up next week (and the December holiday extravaganza after that).

So – how do you enjoy the holidays in a way that embraces the deliciousness of the meals/parties but also leaves you feeling good, both physically and mentally? How can the holiday eating experience be joyful, not stressful?

stress free holiday eating

So many websites and magazine articles tell us how to avoid this and deny ourselves that around the holidays, turning situations that should be fun into stressful internal battles of will. I saw a couple blog posts recently recommending things like “weigh yourself every day!” or “wear your tightest clothes so you will be uncomfortable and won’t eat much!” or “avoid anything with cream!” or “only make/bring food you hate!” Seriously?! This is the advice being given out now? All things that will make people feel extremely guilty, unhappy in their bodies, and like food…

Strength Training Execises for Runners

Source http://www.karpfitness.com/strength-training-exercises-for-runners/

If we look at older generations and ask them how they exercised, the answer is likely “I just ran!” However, over the years the sport of running has evolved and running alone is not enough. These days, almost any sport involves some quantity of strength training. For runners, strength training is essential to preventing injuries and increasing strength. Running has … Read More

The post Strength Training Execises for Runners appeared first on Personal Training Vancouver.

Source http://www.karpfitness.com/strength-training-exercises-for-runners/

If we look at older generations and ask them how they exercised, the answer is likely “I just ran!” However, over the years the sport of running has evolved and running alone is not enough. These days, almost any sport involves some quantity of strength training. For runners, strength training is essential to preventing injuries and increasing strength. Running has … Read More

The post Strength Training Execises for Runners appeared first on Personal Training Vancouver.

Why I Walk: William’s Story

Source: http://blog.alz.org/why-i-walk-williams-story/

My experience with Alzheimer’s started in 2001. My grandfather (my father’s father) died of what was first described to me as senility. I was in my early 20s and thought nothing of it; people in their 80s just forgot things.

It was not until 2009 or 2010 that I started to pay closer attention. We later discovered that my grandfather had had dementia. That’s when I also learned that my grandparents on my mother’s side of the family – both my grandmother and grandfather – also had a form of the disease. My living grandfather has early stage Alzheimer’s. My grandmother was diagnosed with senior dementia.williamwalk

This cause is important to me not only because my grandparents have the disease, but also because I am a financial advisor with Edward Jones, and I work with families currently living wit…

Source: http://blog.alz.org/why-i-walk-williams-story/

My experience with Alzheimer’s started in 2001. My grandfather (my father’s father) died of what was first described to me as senility. I was in my early 20s and thought nothing of it; people in their 80s just forgot things.

It was not until 2009 or 2010 that I started to pay closer attention. We later discovered that my grandfather had had dementia. That’s when I also learned that my grandparents on my mother’s side of the family – both my grandmother and grandfather – also had a form of the disease. My living grandfather has early stage Alzheimer’s. My grandmother was diagnosed with senior dementia.williamwalk

This cause is important to me not only because my grandparents have the disease, but also because I am a financial advisor with Edward Jones, and I work with families currently living wit…