Theorizing on Historical Trends in Body Temperature, Burden of Inflammation, and Life Expectancy

Source https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/theorizing-on-historical-trends-in-body-temperature-burden-of-inflammation-and-life-expectancy/

In today’s open access paper, the authors argue that a downward trend in normal human body temperature recorded by physicians over the past 150 years is real, rather than being an artifact of changing approaches to measurement. Taking that as settled, though I’m sure there is plenty of room left to debate the point, one might then ask why this trend exists and what it might imply.

Over the past few centuries, both life expectancy at birth and adult life expectancy have risen steadily, the former more profoundly than the latter due to sizable reductions in childhood mortality. The majority of these gains in adult life expectancy have been the result of improved control over infectious disease, reducing the burden placed on the immune system over the long term by both chronic and passing infections. The authors of this paper pull from a number of source…

Source https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/01/theorizing-on-historical-trends-in-body-temperature-burden-of-inflammation-and-life-expectancy/

In today’s open access paper, the authors argue that a downward trend in normal human body temperature recorded by physicians over the past 150 years is real, rather than being an artifact of changing approaches to measurement. Taking that as settled, though I’m sure there is plenty of room left to debate the point, one might then ask why this trend exists and what it might imply.

Over the past few centuries, both life expectancy at birth and adult life expectancy have risen steadily, the former more profoundly than the latter due to sizable reductions in childhood mortality. The majority of these gains in adult life expectancy have been the result of improved control over infectious disease, reducing the burden placed on the immune system over the long term by both chronic and passing infections. The authors of this paper pull from a number of source…