Waiting to Get Pregnant? Know the Risks

Source: https://www.webmd.com/baby/features/pregnancy-waiting-risks?src=RSS_PUBLIC

pregnant woman talking to doctor

Are you over 35 and ready to get pregnant for the first time? An OB/GYN suggests creating a “reproductive life plan,” scheduling a checkup, and doing these other things.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/baby/features/pregnancy-waiting-risks?src=RSS_PUBLIC

pregnant woman talking to doctor

Are you over 35 and ready to get pregnant for the first time? An OB/GYN suggests creating a “reproductive life plan,” scheduling a checkup, and doing these other things.

Food For Thoughts: 3 Eating Habits That Are A Real No-Brainer

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/food-for-thoughts-3-eating-habits-that-are-a-real-no-brainer/

When it comes to health, perhaps nothing captivates our attention more than advice about what we should – and shouldn’t – eat. Diet is all at once personal and political. While we all know that indeed “we are what we eat,” our food choices in reality reflect everything from our cultural influences, economic opportunities, health values, and susceptibility to the latest food craze. And this is nothing new. My grandmother, for example, told me that when she was young olive oil was considered terribly unhealthy, with “schmaltz” or rendered chicken fat thought to be a much better choice. Imagine that!

Over my 20+ years dedicated to knowing what we can do to build better brain health, I have seen many brain food fads, including supplements, wax and wane in popularity. As a result, I tend to take a fairly conservative view regarding what we should and shouldn’t be eating for better brain health. Wh…

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/food-for-thoughts-3-eating-habits-that-are-a-real-no-brainer/

When it comes to health, perhaps nothing captivates our attention more than advice about what we should – and shouldn’t – eat. Diet is all at once personal and political. While we all know that indeed “we are what we eat,” our food choices in reality reflect everything from our cultural influences, economic opportunities, health values, and susceptibility to the latest food craze. And this is nothing new. My grandmother, for example, told me that when she was young olive oil was considered terribly unhealthy, with “schmaltz” or rendered chicken fat thought to be a much better choice. Imagine that!

Over my 20+ years dedicated to knowing what we can do to build better brain health, I have seen many brain food fads, including supplements, wax and wane in popularity. As a result, I tend to take a fairly conservative view regarding what we should and shouldn’t be eating for better brain health. Wh…

How to get healthy without dieting | Darya Rose | TEDxSalem

Source https://www.summertomato.com/how-to-get-healthy-without-dieting-darya-rose-tedxsalem



My TEDxSalem talk is live! In it I describe what I believe are the three most essential psychological strategies you need to build better habits and stop dieting for good.

And since I know you’re curious, I was 8 months pregnant and this was shot just days before the eternal misery of the third trimester really set in.

Nova Joy Rose was born February 19, and we’re both doing great.

Source https://www.summertomato.com/how-to-get-healthy-without-dieting-darya-rose-tedxsalem



My TEDxSalem talk is live! In it I describe what I believe are the three most essential psychological strategies you need to build better habits and stop dieting for good.

And since I know you’re curious, I was 8 months pregnant and this was shot just days before the eternal misery of the third trimester really set in.

Nova Joy Rose was born February 19, and we’re both doing great.

Supplements for pets: NutraIngredients-USA.com

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/03/supplements-for-pets-nutraingredients-usa-com/

NutraIngredients-USA.com has collected articles on this topic into a Special Edition: Supplements for pets

The market for supplements for pets is valued at around $2.6 billion, according to the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC).

Issues driving the market growth include an increasing market share of premium supplements positioned as natural and organic; the rise of obesity/weight management among the nation’s pets; and maintaining the health of older pets, which are living for longer.

In this special edition, we explore the key trends (including CBD!), opportunities, and a couple of brand success stories.

Malden Nesheim and I discuss pet supplements in our book, Feed Your Pet Right (which is actually an analysis of the pet food industry).  Just as with supplements for humans, little evidence exists to demonstrate that supplements do any good for pets.  But they make owners feel like they are doing something useful.  As for CBD for pets?  That may make owners feel better too.

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/03/supplements-for-pets-nutraingredients-usa-com/

NutraIngredients-USA.com has collected articles on this topic into a Special Edition: Supplements for pets

The market for supplements for pets is valued at around $2.6 billion, according to the National Animal Supplement Council (NASC).

Issues driving the market growth include an increasing market share of premium supplements positioned as natural and organic; the rise of obesity/weight management among the nation’s pets; and maintaining the health of older pets, which are living for longer.

In this special edition, we explore the key trends (including CBD!), opportunities, and a couple of brand success stories.

Malden Nesheim and I discuss pet supplements in our book, Feed Your Pet Right (which is actually an analysis of the pet food industry).  Just as with supplements for humans, little evidence exists to demonstrate that supplements do any good for pets.  But they make owners feel like they are doing something useful.  As for CBD for pets?  That may make owners feel better too.

Weekend reading: Gandhi’s dietary aspirations

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/03/weekend-reading-gandhis-dietary-aspirations/

Nico Slate.  Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind.  University of Washington Press, 2019.  

Image result for Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind

Let’s start with my blurb:

Nico Slate’s fascinating account reveals Gandhi as an evidence-based, self-experimenting nutrition guru who tried one diet after another—vegan, raw, calorie restriction–in his quest for physical and spiritual health.  Above all, Slate explains Gandhi’s use of fasting as a political means to inspire India to achieve independence.

Gandhi, it seems, was a food faddist well ahead of his time.  The author says:

As his commitment to vegetarianism deepened, Gandhi grappled with whether he should also forgo eggs and milk.  Ultimately, he became convinced that he should become vegan, and renounced all animal products.  Living without eggs was relatively easy.  Doing without milk, by contrast, proved to be one of the greatest challenges of his life.  He experimented with almond milk, peanut milk, and other vegan alternatives.  In 1914, he vowed to abstain from all dairy products.  But after contracting a serious illness, he decided that his pledge did not include goat’s milk. [p. 47]

The book explains how Gandhi’s dietary choices were tightly linked to his politics.

The social potential of a raw diet led Gandhi to explore the cheapest source of sustenance for the poor: wild food…The greatest ethical challenge stemmed from the limitations of wild food as a remedy for poverty.  If the goal was to end hunger, changes in diet would be insufficient if they were not linked to changes in land ownership and the distribution of wealth—change that seemed as impossible as eating ginger nonviolently. [ p. 97]

And one more:

In a world marred by inequality, charity could only do so much.  Ultimately, Gandhi did not want to help the poor; he wanted to end poverty.  Over time, he developed a deeper understanding of the link between famine and imperialism.  “India suffers from starvation because there is dearth not of grain,” he explained, “but of purchasing power.”  The absence of purchasing power was, in turn, a direct result of the economic structures of British rule…Recognizing famine as a result of empire inspired Gandhi to demand India’s freedom. [p.127]

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/03/weekend-reading-gandhis-dietary-aspirations/

Nico Slate.  Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind.  University of Washington Press, 2019.  

Image result for Gandhi’s Search for the Perfect Diet: Eating with the World in Mind

Let’s start with my blurb:

Nico Slate’s fascinating account reveals Gandhi as an evidence-based, self-experimenting nutrition guru who tried one diet after another—vegan, raw, calorie restriction–in his quest for physical and spiritual health.  Above all, Slate explains Gandhi’s use of fasting as a political means to inspire India to achieve independence.

Gandhi, it seems, was a food faddist well ahead of his time.  The author says:

As his commitment to vegetarianism deepened, Gandhi grappled with whether he should also forgo eggs and milk.  Ultimately, he became convinced that he should become vegan, and renounced all animal products.  Living without eggs was relatively easy.  Doing without milk, by contrast, proved to be one of the greatest challenges of his life.  He experimented with almond milk, peanut milk, and other vegan alternatives.  In 1914, he vowed to abstain from all dairy products.  But after contracting a serious illness, he decided that his pledge did not include goat’s milk. [p. 47]

The book explains how Gandhi’s dietary choices were tightly linked to his politics.

The social potential of a raw diet led Gandhi to explore the cheapest source of sustenance for the poor: wild food…The greatest ethical challenge stemmed from the limitations of wild food as a remedy for poverty.  If the goal was to end hunger, changes in diet would be insufficient if they were not linked to changes in land ownership and the distribution of wealth—change that seemed as impossible as eating ginger nonviolently. [ p. 97]

And one more:

In a world marred by inequality, charity could only do so much.  Ultimately, Gandhi did not want to help the poor; he wanted to end poverty.  Over time, he developed a deeper understanding of the link between famine and imperialism.  “India suffers from starvation because there is dearth not of grain,” he explained, “but of purchasing power.”  The absence of purchasing power was, in turn, a direct result of the economic structures of British rule…Recognizing famine as a result of empire inspired Gandhi to demand India’s freedom. [p.127]

The Easiest Way to Make New Friends at Work

Source https://greatist.com/live/how-to-make-friends-at-work?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

This article was created in partnership with Peerfit.

No matter how cultivated your social skills are, starting a new job always feels like the first day of school. You agonize over an outfit the night before, wonder who you’ll sit with at lunch, and have nightmares of getting stuck in the elevator with your new boss (just us?).

Work friendships can be complex, but there’s no denying it’s nice to have a buddy in the office. So what’s the best way to find your BFF when you’re brand spankin’ new? We teamed up with our friends at Peerfit to find out. Peerfit makes it easy to book workout classes and invite folks to join you, which is convenient because one of the quickest ways to meet people at work is surprisingly simple: sweat together.

No, not the nervous kind of sweat that makes your shirt feel uncomfortably damp—we mean exercise-induced sweat. We work out to relieve stress and better our overall mental and physical health, right? Exercising with a colleague means you get to share all those stress-busting, endorphin-pumping good vibes. Plus…

1. Working out together forces you to open up.

We’re our most real selves while exercising (it’s hard to fake a state of calm when you’re gasping for breath in Spin class or slamming away at a punching bag). While you might feel self-conscious at first, by the end of class you’re both likely to have let your guard down. After all, nobody looks like they have their life together after a round of burpees.

2. Group workouts inspire camaraderie (and even a little friendly competition).

Misery loves company! Pick a workout where you have to partner up or work next to each other. Peerfit, a platform that lets you sign up for workouts at thousands of different gyms and studios across 48 states, is an easy way to organize an out-of-office hangout. With a few clicks, you can book bags for boxing, bikes for cycling, or mats for om-ing, so you can commiserate, high-five, or compete to see who can hold a plank the longest.

And the best part? Peerfit works with employers and insurance carriers to pay for the classes. If it’s not part of your new gig’s benefits (you can check here), sign up for a personal subscription—for just $8.95 per month, you’ll get the same access. Just pay per class at a discounted member rate, and you’re good to go.

3. It’s healthier than happy hour.

It’s not breaking news that working out is better for your overall health than boozing it up. A lot of the reasons people drink together (to socialize, gripe, relieve stress) are also good reasons to work out together, so why not schedule fitness classes like they’re social events? It’ll also hold you accountable. And, hey, maybe you grab drinks after the workout—we’re not saying you can’t have it all. Just make sure you eat and hydrate first.

Connecting with a colleague in a stress-relieving environment has been shown to seriously improve overall health and even support personal weight-loss goals. And don’t forget: One in five people meet their significant other at work (!!), so who knows where one sweat date could lead? Just keep your chin up, newbie. Leave that gym bag where your coworkers can see it, and you’ll have a few new friends in no time.

Source https://greatist.com/live/how-to-make-friends-at-work?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

This article was created in partnership with Peerfit.

No matter how cultivated your social skills are, starting a new job always feels like the first day of school. You agonize over an outfit the night before, wonder who you’ll sit with at lunch, and have nightmares of getting stuck in the elevator with your new boss (just us?).

Work friendships can be complex, but there’s no denying it’s nice to have a buddy in the office. So what’s the best way to find your BFF when you’re brand spankin’ new? We teamed up with our friends at Peerfit to find out. Peerfit makes it easy to book workout classes and invite folks to join you, which is convenient because one of the quickest ways to meet people at work is surprisingly simple: sweat together.

No, not the nervous kind of sweat that makes your shirt feel uncomfortably damp—we mean exercise-induced sweat. We work out to relieve stress and better our overall mental and physical health, right? Exercising with a colleague means you get to share all those stress-busting, endorphin-pumping good vibes. Plus…

1. Working out together forces you to open up.

We’re our most real selves while exercising (it’s hard to fake a state of calm when you’re gasping for breath in Spin class or slamming away at a punching bag). While you might feel self-conscious at first, by the end of class you’re both likely to have let your guard down. After all, nobody looks like they have their life together after a round of burpees.

2. Group workouts inspire camaraderie (and even a little friendly competition).

Misery loves company! Pick a workout where you have to partner up or work next to each other. Peerfit, a platform that lets you sign up for workouts at thousands of different gyms and studios across 48 states, is an easy way to organize an out-of-office hangout. With a few clicks, you can book bags for boxing, bikes for cycling, or mats for om-ing, so you can commiserate, high-five, or compete to see who can hold a plank the longest.

And the best part? Peerfit works with employers and insurance carriers to pay for the classes. If it’s not part of your new gig’s benefits (you can check here), sign up for a personal subscription—for just $8.95 per month, you’ll get the same access. Just pay per class at a discounted member rate, and you’re good to go.

3. It’s healthier than happy hour.

It’s not breaking news that working out is better for your overall health than boozing it up. A lot of the reasons people drink together (to socialize, gripe, relieve stress) are also good reasons to work out together, so why not schedule fitness classes like they’re social events? It’ll also hold you accountable. And, hey, maybe you grab drinks after the workout—we’re not saying you can’t have it all. Just make sure you eat and hydrate first.

Connecting with a colleague in a stress-relieving environment has been shown to seriously improve overall health and even support personal weight-loss goals. And don’t forget: One in five people meet their significant other at work (!!), so who knows where one sweat date could lead? Just keep your chin up, newbie. Leave that gym bag where your coworkers can see it, and you’ll have a few new friends in no time.

Elderly Mobility Scale: What Is It and How Is It Used?

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/599789748/0/griswoldhomecare~Elderly-Mobility-Scale-What-Is-It-and-How-Is-It-Used/

Older Man Discussing Mobility

For most older adults, there comes a time when it’s no longer safe to live alone. How do you know when that time has come? It’s a tough question, which is why researchers developed the elderly mobility scale. Though the test has limitations, it can help you make more objective determinations.

What is the Elderly Mobility Scale?

True to its name, the elderly mobility scale (EMS) is a diagnostic tool used to help assess the mobility of seniors. More specifically, it helps to measure an elderly person’s abilities to take on daily tasks, and then provides a score. Sometimes it’s called the modified elderly mobility scale (MEMS) because it’s been amended several times to help improve the accuracy of the test.
In either case, the scale is a scientifically validated assessment tool with more than two decades of research surrounding it. Clinicians have used it to help predict the risk of suffering a fall, or help measure the outcomes of interventions to improve mobility. In other words, it can help tell you when your loved ones are at greater risk of an injury, and to an extent, when their efforts to improve their health are paying off.

Taking the Elderly Mobility Scale

It only takes about 15-minutes to complete the elderly mobility scale. To complete the test, you’ll need a bed, chair, yardstick, and stopwatch. You’ll need any walking aids the person usually uses, and enough space for a 20-foot walk. You’ll also need your own copy of the elderly mobility scale form.
Taking the test is fairly simple because it only requires practicing basic motions. For instance, the test requires you to measure walking speed, functional reach, and how much assistance is needed for moving between the seated and standing position. Then a score is assigned for each question. For example, seniors who can stand without assistance may earn three points. If more assistance is necessary, fewer points are awarded. When every question is complete, a total of 20 points is possible.

Interpreting the Elderly Mobility Scale Score

Scoring between 14 and 20 indicates an ability to safely and independently maneuver through the world. Though some help may be necessary, someone in this EMS score range is generally considered to have enough mobility to be safe at home.
A score between 10 and 13 indicates a borderline status where seniors require some help with daily activities due to mobility limitations. Additional monitoring over time may be necessary to identify further declines.
A score below ten indicates a high level of dependence, where activities like getting dressed and using the bathroom are not possible without assistance. Older adults with scores in this range typically require some form of care.

Limitations of the Elderly Mobility Scale

The elderly mobility scale is a limited assessment tool. It can be ineffective for people who have poor confidence, it doesn’t involve any cognitive screening, and it doesn’t let you measure improvements in mobility past 20-points. With those limitations in mind, having the EMS at your disposal is a great way to ensure your loved ones receive all the care they need. It’s tough to know when worsening mobility will become dangerous, and it can be difficult to convince loved ones they need more support. In the right hands, the elderly mobility scale can help.

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/599789748/0/griswoldhomecare~Elderly-Mobility-Scale-What-Is-It-and-How-Is-It-Used/

Older Man Discussing Mobility

For most older adults, there comes a time when it’s no longer safe to live alone. How do you know when that time has come? It’s a tough question, which is why researchers developed the elderly mobility scale. Though the test has limitations, it can help you make more objective determinations.

What is the Elderly Mobility Scale?

True to its name, the elderly mobility scale (EMS) is a diagnostic tool used to help assess the mobility of seniors. More specifically, it helps to measure an elderly person’s abilities to take on daily tasks, and then provides a score. Sometimes it’s called the modified elderly mobility scale (MEMS) because it’s been amended several times to help improve the accuracy of the test.
In either case, the scale is a scientifically validated assessment tool with more than two decades of research surrounding it. Clinicians have used it to help predict the risk of suffering a fall, or help measure the outcomes of interventions to improve mobility. In other words, it can help tell you when your loved ones are at greater risk of an injury, and to an extent, when their efforts to improve their health are paying off.

Taking the Elderly Mobility Scale

It only takes about 15-minutes to complete the elderly mobility scale. To complete the test, you’ll need a bed, chair, yardstick, and stopwatch. You’ll need any walking aids the person usually uses, and enough space for a 20-foot walk. You’ll also need your own copy of the elderly mobility scale form.
Taking the test is fairly simple because it only requires practicing basic motions. For instance, the test requires you to measure walking speed, functional reach, and how much assistance is needed for moving between the seated and standing position. Then a score is assigned for each question. For example, seniors who can stand without assistance may earn three points. If more assistance is necessary, fewer points are awarded. When every question is complete, a total of 20 points is possible.

Interpreting the Elderly Mobility Scale Score

Scoring between 14 and 20 indicates an ability to safely and independently maneuver through the world. Though some help may be necessary, someone in this EMS score range is generally considered to have enough mobility to be safe at home.
A score between 10 and 13 indicates a borderline status where seniors require some help with daily activities due to mobility limitations. Additional monitoring over time may be necessary to identify further declines.
A score below ten indicates a high level of dependence, where activities like getting dressed and using the bathroom are not possible without assistance. Older adults with scores in this range typically require some form of care.

Limitations of the Elderly Mobility Scale

The elderly mobility scale is a limited assessment tool. It can be ineffective for people who have poor confidence, it doesn’t involve any cognitive screening, and it doesn’t let you measure improvements in mobility past 20-points. With those limitations in mind, having the EMS at your disposal is a great way to ensure your loved ones receive all the care they need. It’s tough to know when worsening mobility will become dangerous, and it can be difficult to convince loved ones they need more support. In the right hands, the elderly mobility scale can help.

How to Stay in Shape While Traveling

Source https://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/how-to-stay-in-shape-while-traveling/

Everybody travels.

Whether it’s for business, pleasure, vacation, or world domination, at some point in our lives we all depart from the comfort of our personal “Shire” to visit another location.

It might be a quick trip to the next town over for a business conference or a massive adventure halfway around the world for months at a time.

No matter what kind of trip it is, one thing is certain:

Our normal routines get completely thrown out the window when traveling:

  • If you work out in a gym, suddenly you might not have access to any equipment.
  • If you run around your neighborhood, suddenly you no longer have a familiar path to follow.
  • If you usually prepare your own meals, suddenly you don’t have a kitchen or fridge.
  • If you’re used to a good night’s sleep, suddenly you’re sleeping at odd hours in different time zones.

We are creatures of habit – while working a normal day job, we can stick to a routine pretty easily (wake up at the same time, eat all meals at the same time, work out at the same time, go to sleep at the same time).

However, when we start traveling, absolutely nothing is familiar and the slightest speed bump can be enough to screw things up.

Luckily, there is hope! 

It’s time to get you a specific action plan that you can take with you on your next trip.

This is the philosophy we teach to all of our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Clients. Many travel quite a bit, so having “worldwide accountability” and a specific plan for travel has been a game changer for these Rebels.

Are you trying to learn a new exercise, lose weight, or build muscle, but find doing it on the road a challenge? Let us help you – click below to learn more.

Step 1: Make It Your Constant

If you are trying to get healthy but need to travel frequently, I want you to make exercise your constant.

I don’t know if you were a Lost fan, but my favorite episode, “The Constant,” involved a character named Desmond who had to find the one “constant” in his life in order to stay sane.

Something Desmond could focus on as his mind traveled through time.

You had to be there.

I’ve traveled quite a bit over the years: sightseeing countries, sleeping on buses, exploring temples, and visiting a new town seemingly every other day.

During all this chaos: exercise became my constant.

I knew that without a doubt, no matter where I was or what I was doing, every other day I would find a way to work out – no excuses. I might have had to add in an extra day between workouts maybe a handful of times.

What I’m trying to say is this: if you are serious about prioritizing your health, even while traveling, then start treating exercise like YOUR constant.

Make it a reliable, consistent thing in your schedule, no matter where you are in the world.

No matter what.

Sound difficult? Start by asking yourself the following:

“If I HAD to still get my workouts in, even if I am traveling or on vacation, how would I do it?”

Most answers will be something like this:

  • “If I had to work out, it would mean that I need to wake up SUPER early tomorrow morning to hit the gym before the conference starts.”
  • “If I had to get my run in, it would mean I could only go for a 20 minute run instead of my normal 60 minute run.”
  • “If I had to get my workout in, that would mean I need to actually PAY for a day pass at a real gym, because I know hotel gyms are crappy.”

This is the most important question you can ask yourself before your trip: “How do I make this work for me?” 

Then, structure your environment and schedule to make it happen:

  • Add it to your calendar.
  • Set up a text reminder.
  • Plan your schedule around it.
  • Have your coach or friend remind you.
  • Research the nearest gym or park.

Again, ask yourself – what if you HAD to work out, no matter what. How would you get it done? What would you need to change?

And then do whatever you can to make it your constant.

“Steve, I can find the time. But What KIND of exercise should I do while traveling?”

It all counts, but if I had to pick one, I’d say strength training.

Studies consistently show that strength training is the best method for weight management – especially when traveling – when coupled with a proper diet (we’ll talk about eating healthy while traveling shortly).[1]

If time is limited on the road, and you’re gonna plan on just one form of exercise, plan for strength training.

You’ll get the most bang for your buck with strength training, especially when compared to a similar amount of time spent doing cardio.

So, if you ONLY have 30 minutes, prioritize strength.

Need some help on starting a strength training routine?

We have a free guide, Strength Training 101: Everything You Need to Know, that will show you exactly how to start a practice to grow strong and build muscle. Plus, there’s a section in there on training without a gym, in case you there’s none in sight.

You can grab the guide for free when you join the Rebellion below:

Let’s talk some actionable steps exercising while traveling.

STep 2: Plan Your Workout Ahead of Schedule

Whenever I travel, my first mission – before I even leave – is to find a place for me to work out.

In some instances, this means I pay $20 for a day pass at a real gym. 

Yes, that is an absurd amount of money to spend for one day in a gym, especially considering I only pay $30 a month for my current gym membership!

However, I gladly pay this amount every time I travel, and prioritize it in my travel budget.

Because exercise is critical in my life right now.

Because NOT exercising isn’t an option (see step 1).

Because I’m not just paying $20 to use a gym.

Because I’m really paying the $20 to KEEP my momentum going.

Everybody struggles with getting back on track AFTER they come home from a trip.

I am no different.

So, by hitting the gym – even when traveling – I am maintaining momentum, which makes getting back into rhythm when I get home super easy.

No gym anywhere in sight?

No problem, I once spent 8 months living out of a backpack and never once set foot in a gym.

So my “gym” became anywhere with the following: 

  • A pull-up bar or swing set
  • A sturdy tree branch
  • A building or bus stop overhang

I know that as long as I can find one of those three things, I could complete a full workout!

My workouts consist of:

You can check out our post “How to Build Your Own Workout Routine” for inspiration on creating a training practice in your nearby environment.

Even just one full-body strength training session per week (if you’re on a shorter trip) can often be enough to allow you to maintain your current levels and hit the ground running when you get back.

What’s that you say? Your hotel gym is TERRIBLE?

I know. They all are.

Which is why I work out in my hotel room instead (here’s a 20-minute routine for you to try).

Just remember, plan ahead and make exercise your “constant.”

STEP 3: Nutrition is Still the Most Important part of the Equation.

Despite what you read in Instagram captions, calories on vacation still count.

Every beer.

Every cookie.

Every french fry.

Armed with this information, you can do one of two things:

  • Path #1: Lament the fact that your body still follows the laws of thermodynamics. Then, eat bad food and feel terrible about yourself when you get home.
  • Path #2: Plan ahead, STILL eat unhealthy food while traveling, and don’t feel bad while doing so. Come home and not weigh any more than you did when you began your trip.

Everybody picks Path #1.

We’re going to pick Path #2.

I promise you it’s possible.

Personally, I know I am going to eat poorly while traveling. It generally means eating at a Chili’s at the airport, or Wendy’s on a road trip. Knowing that this happens literally every time I travel, I plan ahead!

Here’s what I do specifically while traveling:

#1) I skip meals strategically. I know that if I skip breakfast, it means I can eat a slightly larger lunch and have an extra drink with dinner and STILL come in under my daily calorie expenditure.

#2) I prepare for bad meals. I love me a good steak dinner with a side of mac and cheese and sweet potato fries and dessert and a few whiskeys. When I’m on vacation or celebrating, that sounds like heaven to me.

However, I know if I always eat like that, I’m going to pack on a ton of weight.

So I plan ahead for a big meal so that I can enjoy it guilt-free, and not see the scale budge. I eat protein and veggies for lunch, strategically undereating so that I can overeat for dinner – and not gain weight in the long run.

#3) I never eat 2 bad meals in a row. We have a big “never two in a row” rule at Nerd Fitness. Believe it or not, even being healthy just 50% of the time carries with it the tremendous potential for weight loss and a healthier life. So, if you eat a bad lunch, follow it up with a healthy dinner. Eat fast food for dinner? Cool! Make your breakfast healthy.

This is NOT “100% or nothing.” Every decision counts, every meal counts, so any decision where you are SLIIIIIGHTLY healthier than you would have been otherwise is a win in my book.

Curious on my default diet these days? You can read all about it right here. And here is the specific diet I followed – while traveling frequently – to lose 22 pounds sustainably

Tips for Eating HEALTHY on THE ROAD

Since diet is everything, here are some tips for eating nutritiously, airport to airport.

Ask for a mini-fridge. You’d be surprised at how many hotels will have a room with a mini-fridge waiting. You just have to ask for it. Granted, it might be full of junk food they’re trying to peddle on you. Fill it with your own healthy snacks – just make sure they don’t charge you for taking out the other foods! Fruit, sliced veggies, and some deli meat will provide you with some sustenance until you can order a proper meal.

Here is a post with some ideas for healthy snacks you can buy and store in your room.

Travel with a cooler. If you know the hotel can’t accommodate a mini-fridge, or you’re on a road trip, no problem! Bring a mini-cooler or cooler bag. If you use a bag, it’ll fold up for easy packing.

Is it weird to travel with a cooler? Sure. But we embrace weird around these parts.

Bring non-perishable snacks with you. I’ve eaten almonds forgotten in a backpack, months later, and lived to tell the tale.

Lots of dry food like nuts and jerky won’t spoil anytime soon, so store some in your travel bag. It’s a good move to have snacks on you at all times, because who knows when you’ll eat next. Munching some beef jerky is a much better idea than the pizza in the airport terminal. Here are some good almonds to purchase, and here’s some recommended beef jerky for you to try out.

Focus on protein and fiber. When choosing meals or snacks, make sure the foods you pick are full of protein and fiber.[2] This will help keep you full, so you’re not tempted to eat the donuts waiting for you at your work conference.

What are protein and fiber-rich foods? Hard-boiled eggs will store good, and can be bought at many convenience stores. That’s a good protein source. Deli meat, jerky, and nuts will also do the trick for your protein requirements.

Fiber-rich foods? Fruits and vegetables for the win. Always bring an apple with you.

All is not lost if you order fast food. There’s a common belief amongst our coaching clients, that the moment you step foot in a fast food store, you lost. You made a terrible decision by even walking in. Might as well order whatever, because you already failed.

This is 100% not true. What you order will make all the difference. For example, I eat a chicken bowl from Chipotle almost every day. To the point that it’s weird.[3]

Why? Because it’s healthier than anything I’m realistically going to make at lunchtime, given my schedule.

Remember, what you order, is often more important than where you order.

Let’s dive into that last point a little more.

HEALTHY EATING THROUGH FAST FOOD

Let’s outline an entire day’s worth of eating, provided by a drive-thru window.

Most of these can also be found at your average airport terminal.

BREAKFAST:

Location: Starbucks

  • Sous Vide Egg Bites, Bacon & Gruyere: A great protein source. Go ahead and order some black coffee with it too.
    • Calories: 310
    • Protein: 19g
    • Net Carbs: 9g
    • Fat: 22g

Location: Dunkin’ Donuts

  • Sausage Egg and Cheese Bagel (no bagel): Sausage and egg are a breakfast staple. Plus, cheese!
    • Calories: 370
    • Protein: 16g
    • Net Carbs: 3g
    • Fat: 33g

LUNCH:

Location: McDonald’s

  • Bacon Ranch Grilled Chicken Salad (Use the Balsamic Vinaigrette): It’s mostly greens, grilled chicken and a little bacon. No customization required. Your salad comes in under 400 calories.
    • Calories: 320
    • Protein: 42g
    • Net Carbs: 6g
    • Fat: 14g

Location: Subway

  • Oven Roasted Chicken: Grab it with lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, onion, green peppers, cucumbers, and olives, with oil and vinegar as dressing. Also, feel free to add bacon and guacamole to increase your calories. Your nutrition info will look like this if ordered as above:
    • Calories: 490
    • Protein: 24g
    • Net Carbs: 11g
    • Fat: 35.5g

DINNER:

Location: Boston Market

  • Three-Piece Dark: Lot’s of protein, decent fat, and no carbs.
    • Calories: 300
    • Protein: 37g
    • Net Carbs: 1g
    • Fat: 16g
  •  Green Beans: Keep it simple.
    • Calories: 90cals
    • Protein: 1g
    • Net Carbs: 4g
    • Fat: 5g
  • Fresh Steamed Vegetables: Following our “simple” strategy.
    • Calories: 60
    • Protein: 2g
    • Net Carbs: 4g
    • Fat: 3.5g

Location: Chipotle

  • Salad Bowl (with Carnitas): order it with Fajita Vegetables, Fresh Tomato Salsa, Sour Cream, Cheese, and YES for Guacamole.
    • Calories: 710
    • Protein: 34g
    • Net Carbs: 12
    • Fat: 51g

The above should help give you some ideas on what to order when you’re depending on fast food.

Want some more ideas? You got it.

HOW TO EAT HEALTHY AT THE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

So your room comes with a free complimentary breakfast.

Might as well take advantage of it!

Go ahead and load up on these:

Eggs. We mentioned earlier to prioritize protein with your meals. Just about every hotel continental breakfast will have some eggs. The quality might be so-so, however. If they have some hot sauce around, this can make just about any scramble tolerable.

Sausage. Continuing with our protein theme, if there is sausage at the buffet, grab some. Granted, it’ll often have some sugar in the form of maple syrup included. But we’re going with the best we can here.

Bacon. We love bacon around these parts so much, we wrote an entire post on it. The fat in bacon will help keep you full until you’re next meal. Plus, if the eggs are crappy (the eggs will probably be crappy), you can mix in some bacon to bring up the tasty factor.

Fruit. It can’t all be about meat. Go ahead and grab some fruit for your plate. Apples are relatively high in fiber, which is why they’re my go to. Bananas also have decent fiber, as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium.

Are there berries available? Grab some for their antioxidant potential (we talk all about berries and antioxidants in this article).

One final word about fruit. Fruit can be relatively high in sugar, so it’s important to eat some protein (eggs, sausage) with it to help prevent insulin spikes. You can check out this article for a deep dive into the subject.

Toast. I know, I know, we might be attracting the Carb Police on us for this one. But you can do a lot worse at a breakfast buffet than a little whole wheat toast. If you put some eggs and bacon on it, you have yourself a pretty decent breakfast sandwich with some fiber to help keep you full.

Alright, prioritize the above on your plate. Plus, stay clear of the following:

Juice. If I could give you one single piece of diet advice, it would be this: don’t drink your calories. There’s a lot of arguments on diets, but this advice is widely accepted.

An orange has plenty of vitamins in it, plus a lot of fiber to help balance out the sugar. OJ? Zero fiber, which means it’ll wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels.

Skip the juice and eat the whole fruit.

Pancakes/Waffles. Don’t eat these. The batter itself will have sugar in it, plus it’s designed to have more sugar (maple syrup) poured on top.

Stick to toast.

Cereal. A breakfast food often packed full of sugar is cereal. For example, the third ingredient for Cheerios is “sugar.” And that’s Cheerios. Don’t even get me started on Fruit Loops or Frosted Flakes.

Again, stick to toast.

The above advice should get you started on loading up properly at a breakfast buffet.

Step 4: Stay Active. it All Counts.

Last but not least – stay active.

I don’t care if you’re walking laps in the airport while listening to Ke$ha during a two-hour layover or jumping rope at a bus stop – if you can find a way to be active, you are winning.

It all counts!

I already told you that eating right will be 90% of your success or failure – that means you need to be “on” with how you eat every day, even on days that you’re not strength training.

Go for a run around the town, go for a hike, toss a frisbee in the park, go swimming in the ocean, etc.

Whatever it is, do something!

Here’s why this is so crucial: on days when I exercise, I eat better.

Something activates in my brain when exercising that says “I’m trying to be healthy, so I’m going to eat healthy.”

On days when I don’t exercise at all, I tend to say things like “meh, I’ll do it tomorrow” or ‘it’s only one meal” or “it’s only 37 beers” (kidding, Mom).

Want to keep things simple?

Go for a walk try walking EVERYWHERE. In a big city? If it’s nice out walk instead of taking a cab! Go for a jog around your new surroundings…just stay active.

If you’re on a work trip, consider trying a “walking meeting,” made famous by Steve Jobs. You know, that guy who is responsible for the device you’re probably reading this article on.

Step 5: Practice Antifragility.

Things are going to go wrong while you travel.

Your flight WILL get delayed.

Your only options for food WILL be McDonald’s.

Your hotel gym WILL be crappy.

You’ll forget your kid at home.

It’s going to happen, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

So rather than getting flustered and lamenting the fact that things aren’t perfect, prepare for chaos!

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

And what doesn’t break you makes you stronger too. 

This is how we become antifragile.

If you know things will most likely get disrupted, then you won’t be bamboozled when it happens!

This is why I try to live out former president Teddy Roosevelt’s quote: “Do the best you can, with what you have, where you are.”

I know I’m going to eat fast food and get stuck doing a hotel room workout.

It’s better than nothing, right?

If I can’t get to a gym…I do a workout in a park.

If I can’t get to a park…I do a workout in my hotel room.

If I can’t do a full workout, I do half a workout.

If I can’t eat perfectly, I aim for “pretty good.”

50% compliance is still 50% better than nothing!

A NOTE ON SLEEP, JET LAG, AND HYDRATION

We need to address a few final points: sleep, jet lag, and hydration.

All of these are going to impact your ability to follow the steps above. 

FIRST UP, SLEEP.

When I’m sleep deprived, I often don’t have the energy to exercise…when the reality is that exercise is often the thing that will give me energy (foreshadowing).

Also, if you’re lacking on shuteye, you’ll get hungrier.[4] When you’re sleep deprived, your brain sends signals for more energy, which means more calories. This is troublesome if you’re trying to hold out until you can order a nutritious chicken salad.

Prioritize sleep.

Two good tools to help with this are earplugs and an eye mask. Some hotels have a way of being bright and noisy.

DEALING WITH JET LAG.

Even being able to go to sleep, is going to assume you are not suffering terribly from “jet lag.”

Jet lag is the phenomenon of traveling from one time zone to another, but still being stuck in the former time.

For example, you fly from New York to London.

It was night when you left New York. It is now morning in London. You may or may not have slept on the plane.

What time is it?

Your body can have some serious trouble getting back on track, because our circadian rhythms (our biological clock) is thrown off from the geographic change.

My solution: work out (Step #4 again).

Studies have shown that a good sweat can help change your circadian rhythm, which might help you adjust to the local time.[5]

If you’re able to, work out as soon as you get settled to help combat jet lag. I’ve personally found this to be super helpful in adjusting to the local time. 

FINALLY, HYDRATION.

Air travel dehydrates you.[5] The cabin’s air is environmentally controlled, with lower moisture than you find here on the ground.

  • Humidity on the good old fashioned Earth: 30-60%
  • Moisture in an average airplane: 10-20%

Yeah…that 10-20% is less than the Sahara desert.

On top of that, the pressurization of the cabin itself causes you to expel H2O.

Something something, physics. Something something, less water.

The low humidity and pressurized environment create a perfect scenario for you to lose lots of water. 

And if you’re dehydrated, it can make you tired, which can go back to that whole hunger and calories thing.

Drink water.

Travel WorkoutS and Healthy Eating Resources

I respect the road warrior, and I respect you for wanting to learn how to be healthy while you travel.

Here are some other Nerd Fitness resources you can check out if you want to dive deeper.

MY FAVORITE TRAVEL WORKOUTS:

RESOURCES FOR HEALTHY EATING WHILE TRAVELING: 

Above all else, Preserve momentum!

Whatever you’re currently working on improving in your life, you can continue working on that while traveling.

You only fall off the wagon if you resign yourself to the fact that it’s impossible to stay fit while traveling!

Why not have the opposite mindset, and ask “How do I make this work for me?”

Millions of people manage to stay healthy despite a hectic travel schedule, and I want the same for you.

Here are some final tips to help you while traveling: 

Travel day? Pack some healthy snacks with you in your bag – apples and almonds are my go-to.

Going out to dinner with your company? Find the restaurant online, scour the menu, and “pre-order your dinner” in your mind so you know what to order when you get there. Order the “meat + veggie + potato” option on the menu, and ask for double veggies instead. Aim for something like steak tips, or grilled chicken, salmon, etc.

Traveling with your family? Let them know that you’re making a concerted effort to eat better and that you’d like their support.

Going out with friends? Let’s say you’re going out with buddies, and you have no choice but to eat fried food and drink tons of beer (I hate when that happens).

Compensate by being extra diligent on the days before and after – no drive-thru meals, no late-night vending machine stops, no bad snacks while at the convention.

Pick your battles. Plan ahead. Make eating a priority.

Alright, that should help get you started. Now, your turn:

Do you travel for work?

Do you have a big adventure coming up?  An upcoming vacation this summer?

What struggles do you have while on the road? What kind of questions do you have about staying in shape and traveling?

Leave a question in the comments and I’ll help in any way that I can.

-Steve

PS – I want to again remind you of our Online Coaching Program. If you live from hotel room to hotel room, constantly on the go, there are still some things you can keep constant: your coach!

They can be right there with you, from any part of the world, helping you make sure you hit your fitness goals.

Click right here to learn more.

###

All photo citations can be read right here.[6]

Footnotes    ( returns to text)

  1. You can check out this study, and this study, and this study on the benefits of strength training.
  2. You can check on this study on protein and satiation, and this one on fiber.
  3. Again, embrace it.
  4. Here’s a study on sleep and appetite for you to check out.
  5. You can check out this study on exercising and circadian rhythms.
  6. The LA Times has a great article on the subject.
  7. Backpacker, Decathlon, Good Party, Newtonmas, Apples, Model Train DisplayCalifonia Dreamin, Angry Hulk, Dirt Bike.

Source https://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/how-to-stay-in-shape-while-traveling/

Everybody travels.

Whether it’s for business, pleasure, vacation, or world domination, at some point in our lives we all depart from the comfort of our personal “Shire” to visit another location.

It might be a quick trip to the next town over for a business conference or a massive adventure halfway around the world for months at a time.

No matter what kind of trip it is, one thing is certain:

Our normal routines get completely thrown out the window when traveling:

  • If you work out in a gym, suddenly you might not have access to any equipment.
  • If you run around your neighborhood, suddenly you no longer have a familiar path to follow.
  • If you usually prepare your own meals, suddenly you don’t have a kitchen or fridge.
  • If you’re used to a good night’s sleep, suddenly you’re sleeping at odd hours in different time zones.

We are creatures of habit – while working a normal day job, we can stick to a routine pretty easily (wake up at the same time, eat all meals at the same time, work out at the same time, go to sleep at the same time).

However, when we start traveling, absolutely nothing is familiar and the slightest speed bump can be enough to screw things up.

Luckily, there is hope! 

It’s time to get you a specific action plan that you can take with you on your next trip.

This is the philosophy we teach to all of our 1-on-1 Online Coaching Clients. Many travel quite a bit, so having “worldwide accountability” and a specific plan for travel has been a game changer for these Rebels.

Are you trying to learn a new exercise, lose weight, or build muscle, but find doing it on the road a challenge? Let us help you – click below to learn more.

Step 1: Make It Your Constant

If you are trying to get healthy but need to travel frequently, I want you to make exercise your constant.

I don’t know if you were a Lost fan, but my favorite episode, “The Constant,” involved a character named Desmond who had to find the one “constant” in his life in order to stay sane.

Something Desmond could focus on as his mind traveled through time.

You had to be there.

I’ve traveled quite a bit over the years: sightseeing countries, sleeping on buses, exploring temples, and visiting a new town seemingly every other day.

During all this chaos: exercise became my constant.

I knew that without a doubt, no matter where I was or what I was doing, every other day I would find a way to work out – no excuses. I might have had to add in an extra day between workouts maybe a handful of times.

What I’m trying to say is this: if you are serious about prioritizing your health, even while traveling, then start treating exercise like YOUR constant.

Make it a reliable, consistent thing in your schedule, no matter where you are in the world.

No matter what.

Sound difficult? Start by asking yourself the following:

“If I HAD to still get my workouts in, even if I am traveling or on vacation, how would I do it?”

Most answers will be something like this:

  • “If I had to work out, it would mean that I need to wake up SUPER early tomorrow morning to hit the gym before the conference starts.”
  • “If I had to get my run in, it would mean I could only go for a 20 minute run instead of my normal 60 minute run.”
  • “If I had to get my workout in, that would mean I need to actually PAY for a day pass at a real gym, because I know hotel gyms are crappy.”

This is the most important question you can ask yourself before your trip: “How do I make this work for me?” 

Then, structure your environment and schedule to make it happen:

  • Add it to your calendar.
  • Set up a text reminder.
  • Plan your schedule around it.
  • Have your coach or friend remind you.
  • Research the nearest gym or park.

Again, ask yourself – what if you HAD to work out, no matter what. How would you get it done? What would you need to change?

And then do whatever you can to make it your constant.

“Steve, I can find the time. But What KIND of exercise should I do while traveling?”

It all counts, but if I had to pick one, I’d say strength training.

Studies consistently show that strength training is the best method for weight management – especially when traveling – when coupled with a proper diet (we’ll talk about eating healthy while traveling shortly).[1]

If time is limited on the road, and you’re gonna plan on just one form of exercise, plan for strength training.

You’ll get the most bang for your buck with strength training, especially when compared to a similar amount of time spent doing cardio.

So, if you ONLY have 30 minutes, prioritize strength.

Need some help on starting a strength training routine?

We have a free guide, Strength Training 101: Everything You Need to Know, that will show you exactly how to start a practice to grow strong and build muscle. Plus, there’s a section in there on training without a gym, in case you there’s none in sight.

You can grab the guide for free when you join the Rebellion below:

Let’s talk some actionable steps exercising while traveling.

STep 2: Plan Your Workout Ahead of Schedule

Whenever I travel, my first mission – before I even leave – is to find a place for me to work out.

In some instances, this means I pay $20 for a day pass at a real gym. 

Yes, that is an absurd amount of money to spend for one day in a gym, especially considering I only pay $30 a month for my current gym membership!

However, I gladly pay this amount every time I travel, and prioritize it in my travel budget.

Because exercise is critical in my life right now.

Because NOT exercising isn’t an option (see step 1).

Because I’m not just paying $20 to use a gym.

Because I’m really paying the $20 to KEEP my momentum going.

Everybody struggles with getting back on track AFTER they come home from a trip.

I am no different.

So, by hitting the gym – even when traveling – I am maintaining momentum, which makes getting back into rhythm when I get home super easy.

No gym anywhere in sight?

No problem, I once spent 8 months living out of a backpack and never once set foot in a gym.

So my “gym” became anywhere with the following: 

  • A pull-up bar or swing set
  • A sturdy tree branch
  • A building or bus stop overhang

I know that as long as I can find one of those three things, I could complete a full workout!

My workouts consist of:

You can check out our post “How to Build Your Own Workout Routine” for inspiration on creating a training practice in your nearby environment.

Even just one full-body strength training session per week (if you’re on a shorter trip) can often be enough to allow you to maintain your current levels and hit the ground running when you get back.

What’s that you say? Your hotel gym is TERRIBLE?

I know. They all are.

Which is why I work out in my hotel room instead (here’s a 20-minute routine for you to try).

Just remember, plan ahead and make exercise your “constant.”

STEP 3: Nutrition is Still the Most Important part of the Equation.

Despite what you read in Instagram captions, calories on vacation still count.

Every beer.

Every cookie.

Every french fry.

Armed with this information, you can do one of two things:

  • Path #1: Lament the fact that your body still follows the laws of thermodynamics. Then, eat bad food and feel terrible about yourself when you get home.
  • Path #2: Plan ahead, STILL eat unhealthy food while traveling, and don’t feel bad while doing so. Come home and not weigh any more than you did when you began your trip.

Everybody picks Path #1.

We’re going to pick Path #2.

I promise you it’s possible.

Personally, I know I am going to eat poorly while traveling. It generally means eating at a Chili’s at the airport, or Wendy’s on a road trip. Knowing that this happens literally every time I travel, I plan ahead!

Here’s what I do specifically while traveling:

#1) I skip meals strategically. I know that if I skip breakfast, it means I can eat a slightly larger lunch and have an extra drink with dinner and STILL come in under my daily calorie expenditure.

#2) I prepare for bad meals. I love me a good steak dinner with a side of mac and cheese and sweet potato fries and dessert and a few whiskeys. When I’m on vacation or celebrating, that sounds like heaven to me.

However, I know if I always eat like that, I’m going to pack on a ton of weight.

So I plan ahead for a big meal so that I can enjoy it guilt-free, and not see the scale budge. I eat protein and veggies for lunch, strategically undereating so that I can overeat for dinner – and not gain weight in the long run.

#3) I never eat 2 bad meals in a row. We have a big “never two in a row” rule at Nerd Fitness. Believe it or not, even being healthy just 50% of the time carries with it the tremendous potential for weight loss and a healthier life. So, if you eat a bad lunch, follow it up with a healthy dinner. Eat fast food for dinner? Cool! Make your breakfast healthy.

This is NOT “100% or nothing.” Every decision counts, every meal counts, so any decision where you are SLIIIIIGHTLY healthier than you would have been otherwise is a win in my book.

Curious on my default diet these days? You can read all about it right here. And here is the specific diet I followed – while traveling frequently – to lose 22 pounds sustainably

Tips for Eating HEALTHY on THE ROAD

Since diet is everything, here are some tips for eating nutritiously, airport to airport.

Ask for a mini-fridge. You’d be surprised at how many hotels will have a room with a mini-fridge waiting. You just have to ask for it. Granted, it might be full of junk food they’re trying to peddle on you. Fill it with your own healthy snacks – just make sure they don’t charge you for taking out the other foods! Fruit, sliced veggies, and some deli meat will provide you with some sustenance until you can order a proper meal.

Here is a post with some ideas for healthy snacks you can buy and store in your room.

Travel with a cooler. If you know the hotel can’t accommodate a mini-fridge, or you’re on a road trip, no problem! Bring a mini-cooler or cooler bag. If you use a bag, it’ll fold up for easy packing.

Is it weird to travel with a cooler? Sure. But we embrace weird around these parts.

Bring non-perishable snacks with you. I’ve eaten almonds forgotten in a backpack, months later, and lived to tell the tale.

Lots of dry food like nuts and jerky won’t spoil anytime soon, so store some in your travel bag. It’s a good move to have snacks on you at all times, because who knows when you’ll eat next. Munching some beef jerky is a much better idea than the pizza in the airport terminal. Here are some good almonds to purchase, and here’s some recommended beef jerky for you to try out.

Focus on protein and fiber. When choosing meals or snacks, make sure the foods you pick are full of protein and fiber.[2] This will help keep you full, so you’re not tempted to eat the donuts waiting for you at your work conference.

What are protein and fiber-rich foods? Hard-boiled eggs will store good, and can be bought at many convenience stores. That’s a good protein source. Deli meat, jerky, and nuts will also do the trick for your protein requirements.

Fiber-rich foods? Fruits and vegetables for the win. Always bring an apple with you.

All is not lost if you order fast food. There’s a common belief amongst our coaching clients, that the moment you step foot in a fast food store, you lost. You made a terrible decision by even walking in. Might as well order whatever, because you already failed.

This is 100% not true. What you order will make all the difference. For example, I eat a chicken bowl from Chipotle almost every day. To the point that it’s weird.[3]

Why? Because it’s healthier than anything I’m realistically going to make at lunchtime, given my schedule.

Remember, what you order, is often more important than where you order.

Let’s dive into that last point a little more.

HEALTHY EATING THROUGH FAST FOOD

Let’s outline an entire day’s worth of eating, provided by a drive-thru window.

Most of these can also be found at your average airport terminal.

BREAKFAST:

Location: Starbucks

  • Sous Vide Egg Bites, Bacon & Gruyere: A great protein source. Go ahead and order some black coffee with it too.
    • Calories: 310
    • Protein: 19g
    • Net Carbs: 9g
    • Fat: 22g

Location: Dunkin’ Donuts

  • Sausage Egg and Cheese Bagel (no bagel): Sausage and egg are a breakfast staple. Plus, cheese!
    • Calories: 370
    • Protein: 16g
    • Net Carbs: 3g
    • Fat: 33g

LUNCH:

Location: McDonald’s

  • Bacon Ranch Grilled Chicken Salad (Use the Balsamic Vinaigrette): It’s mostly greens, grilled chicken and a little bacon. No customization required. Your salad comes in under 400 calories.
    • Calories: 320
    • Protein: 42g
    • Net Carbs: 6g
    • Fat: 14g

Location: Subway

  • Oven Roasted Chicken: Grab it with lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, onion, green peppers, cucumbers, and olives, with oil and vinegar as dressing. Also, feel free to add bacon and guacamole to increase your calories. Your nutrition info will look like this if ordered as above:
    • Calories: 490
    • Protein: 24g
    • Net Carbs: 11g
    • Fat: 35.5g

DINNER:

Location: Boston Market

  • Three-Piece Dark: Lot’s of protein, decent fat, and no carbs.
    • Calories: 300
    • Protein: 37g
    • Net Carbs: 1g
    • Fat: 16g
  •  Green Beans: Keep it simple.
    • Calories: 90cals
    • Protein: 1g
    • Net Carbs: 4g
    • Fat: 5g
  • Fresh Steamed Vegetables: Following our “simple” strategy.
    • Calories: 60
    • Protein: 2g
    • Net Carbs: 4g
    • Fat: 3.5g

Location: Chipotle

  • Salad Bowl (with Carnitas): order it with Fajita Vegetables, Fresh Tomato Salsa, Sour Cream, Cheese, and YES for Guacamole.
    • Calories: 710
    • Protein: 34g
    • Net Carbs: 12
    • Fat: 51g

The above should help give you some ideas on what to order when you’re depending on fast food.

Want some more ideas? You got it.

HOW TO EAT HEALTHY AT THE CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

So your room comes with a free complimentary breakfast.

Might as well take advantage of it!

Go ahead and load up on these:

Eggs. We mentioned earlier to prioritize protein with your meals. Just about every hotel continental breakfast will have some eggs. The quality might be so-so, however. If they have some hot sauce around, this can make just about any scramble tolerable.

Sausage. Continuing with our protein theme, if there is sausage at the buffet, grab some. Granted, it’ll often have some sugar in the form of maple syrup included. But we’re going with the best we can here.

Bacon. We love bacon around these parts so much, we wrote an entire post on it. The fat in bacon will help keep you full until you’re next meal. Plus, if the eggs are crappy (the eggs will probably be crappy), you can mix in some bacon to bring up the tasty factor.

Fruit. It can’t all be about meat. Go ahead and grab some fruit for your plate. Apples are relatively high in fiber, which is why they’re my go to. Bananas also have decent fiber, as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium.

Are there berries available? Grab some for their antioxidant potential (we talk all about berries and antioxidants in this article).

One final word about fruit. Fruit can be relatively high in sugar, so it’s important to eat some protein (eggs, sausage) with it to help prevent insulin spikes. You can check out this article for a deep dive into the subject.

Toast. I know, I know, we might be attracting the Carb Police on us for this one. But you can do a lot worse at a breakfast buffet than a little whole wheat toast. If you put some eggs and bacon on it, you have yourself a pretty decent breakfast sandwich with some fiber to help keep you full.

Alright, prioritize the above on your plate. Plus, stay clear of the following:

Juice. If I could give you one single piece of diet advice, it would be this: don’t drink your calories. There’s a lot of arguments on diets, but this advice is widely accepted.

An orange has plenty of vitamins in it, plus a lot of fiber to help balance out the sugar. OJ? Zero fiber, which means it’ll wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels.

Skip the juice and eat the whole fruit.

Pancakes/Waffles. Don’t eat these. The batter itself will have sugar in it, plus it’s designed to have more sugar (maple syrup) poured on top.

Stick to toast.

Cereal. A breakfast food often packed full of sugar is cereal. For example, the third ingredient for Cheerios is “sugar.” And that’s Cheerios. Don’t even get me started on Fruit Loops or Frosted Flakes.

Again, stick to toast.

The above advice should get you started on loading up properly at a breakfast buffet.

Step 4: Stay Active. it All Counts.

Last but not least – stay active.

I don’t care if you’re walking laps in the airport while listening to Ke$ha during a two-hour layover or jumping rope at a bus stop – if you can find a way to be active, you are winning.

It all counts!

I already told you that eating right will be 90% of your success or failure – that means you need to be “on” with how you eat every day, even on days that you’re not strength training.

Go for a run around the town, go for a hike, toss a frisbee in the park, go swimming in the ocean, etc.

Whatever it is, do something!

Here’s why this is so crucial: on days when I exercise, I eat better.

Something activates in my brain when exercising that says “I’m trying to be healthy, so I’m going to eat healthy.”

On days when I don’t exercise at all, I tend to say things like “meh, I’ll do it tomorrow” or ‘it’s only one meal” or “it’s only 37 beers” (kidding, Mom).

Want to keep things simple?

Go for a walk try walking EVERYWHERE. In a big city? If it’s nice out walk instead of taking a cab! Go for a jog around your new surroundings…just stay active.

If you’re on a work trip, consider trying a “walking meeting,” made famous by Steve Jobs. You know, that guy who is responsible for the device you’re probably reading this article on.

Step 5: Practice Antifragility.

Things are going to go wrong while you travel.

Your flight WILL get delayed.

Your only options for food WILL be McDonald’s.

Your hotel gym WILL be crappy.

You’ll forget your kid at home.

It’s going to happen, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

So rather than getting flustered and lamenting the fact that things aren’t perfect, prepare for chaos!

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

And what doesn’t break you makes you stronger too. 

This is how we become antifragile.

If you know things will most likely get disrupted, then you won’t be bamboozled when it happens!

This is why I try to live out former president Teddy Roosevelt’s quote: “Do the best you can, with what you have, where you are.”

I know I’m going to eat fast food and get stuck doing a hotel room workout.

It’s better than nothing, right?

If I can’t get to a gym…I do a workout in a park.

If I can’t get to a park…I do a workout in my hotel room.

If I can’t do a full workout, I do half a workout.

If I can’t eat perfectly, I aim for “pretty good.”

50% compliance is still 50% better than nothing!

A NOTE ON SLEEP, JET LAG, AND HYDRATION

We need to address a few final points: sleep, jet lag, and hydration.

All of these are going to impact your ability to follow the steps above. 

FIRST UP, SLEEP.

When I’m sleep deprived, I often don’t have the energy to exercise…when the reality is that exercise is often the thing that will give me energy (foreshadowing).

Also, if you’re lacking on shuteye, you’ll get hungrier.[4] When you’re sleep deprived, your brain sends signals for more energy, which means more calories. This is troublesome if you’re trying to hold out until you can order a nutritious chicken salad.

Prioritize sleep.

Two good tools to help with this are earplugs and an eye mask. Some hotels have a way of being bright and noisy.

DEALING WITH JET LAG.

Even being able to go to sleep, is going to assume you are not suffering terribly from “jet lag.”

Jet lag is the phenomenon of traveling from one time zone to another, but still being stuck in the former time.

For example, you fly from New York to London.

It was night when you left New York. It is now morning in London. You may or may not have slept on the plane.

What time is it?

Your body can have some serious trouble getting back on track, because our circadian rhythms (our biological clock) is thrown off from the geographic change.

My solution: work out (Step #4 again).

Studies have shown that a good sweat can help change your circadian rhythm, which might help you adjust to the local time.[5]

If you’re able to, work out as soon as you get settled to help combat jet lag. I’ve personally found this to be super helpful in adjusting to the local time. 

FINALLY, HYDRATION.

Air travel dehydrates you.[5] The cabin’s air is environmentally controlled, with lower moisture than you find here on the ground.

  • Humidity on the good old fashioned Earth: 30-60%
  • Moisture in an average airplane: 10-20%

Yeah…that 10-20% is less than the Sahara desert.

On top of that, the pressurization of the cabin itself causes you to expel H2O.

Something something, physics. Something something, less water.

The low humidity and pressurized environment create a perfect scenario for you to lose lots of water. 

And if you’re dehydrated, it can make you tired, which can go back to that whole hunger and calories thing.

Drink water.

Travel WorkoutS and Healthy Eating Resources

I respect the road warrior, and I respect you for wanting to learn how to be healthy while you travel.

Here are some other Nerd Fitness resources you can check out if you want to dive deeper.

MY FAVORITE TRAVEL WORKOUTS:

RESOURCES FOR HEALTHY EATING WHILE TRAVELING: 

Above all else, Preserve momentum!

Whatever you’re currently working on improving in your life, you can continue working on that while traveling.

You only fall off the wagon if you resign yourself to the fact that it’s impossible to stay fit while traveling!

Why not have the opposite mindset, and ask “How do I make this work for me?”

Millions of people manage to stay healthy despite a hectic travel schedule, and I want the same for you.

Here are some final tips to help you while traveling: 

Travel day? Pack some healthy snacks with you in your bag – apples and almonds are my go-to.

Going out to dinner with your company? Find the restaurant online, scour the menu, and “pre-order your dinner” in your mind so you know what to order when you get there. Order the “meat + veggie + potato” option on the menu, and ask for double veggies instead. Aim for something like steak tips, or grilled chicken, salmon, etc.

Traveling with your family? Let them know that you’re making a concerted effort to eat better and that you’d like their support.

Going out with friends? Let’s say you’re going out with buddies, and you have no choice but to eat fried food and drink tons of beer (I hate when that happens).

Compensate by being extra diligent on the days before and after – no drive-thru meals, no late-night vending machine stops, no bad snacks while at the convention.

Pick your battles. Plan ahead. Make eating a priority.

Alright, that should help get you started. Now, your turn:

Do you travel for work?

Do you have a big adventure coming up?  An upcoming vacation this summer?

What struggles do you have while on the road? What kind of questions do you have about staying in shape and traveling?

Leave a question in the comments and I’ll help in any way that I can.

-Steve

PS – I want to again remind you of our Online Coaching Program. If you live from hotel room to hotel room, constantly on the go, there are still some things you can keep constant: your coach!

They can be right there with you, from any part of the world, helping you make sure you hit your fitness goals.

Click right here to learn more.

###

All photo citations can be read right here.[6]

Footnotes    ( returns to text)

  1. You can check out this study, and this study, and this study on the benefits of strength training.
  2. You can check on this study on protein and satiation, and this one on fiber.
  3. Again, embrace it.
  4. Here’s a study on sleep and appetite for you to check out.
  5. You can check out this study on exercising and circadian rhythms.
  6. The LA Times has a great article on the subject.
  7. Backpacker, Decathlon, Good Party, Newtonmas, Apples, Model Train DisplayCalifonia Dreamin, Angry Hulk, Dirt Bike.

It’s time for cameras – nursing homes, assisted living, and home care

Source https://www.ageinplacetech.com/blog/it-s-time-cameras-nursing-homes-assisted-living-and-home-care

Where the baby (or elderly family member) may be.  The WSJ investigation of Care.com has only added a level of urgency about the risky business of finding and placing caregivers in homes. Consider the Care.com CEO’s egregious assertion that “Care.com is a marketplace platform, like Indeed or LinkedIn.”  Really, finding someone to watch your baby or your aging father is analogous to finding a worker to fill a job opening in your IT department or seeking a manager to fill out your org chart? And having nasty problems with convicted criminals taking on caregiving roles, with deaths occurring in multiple states, but never aggregated into a nationwide picture of a horror show, until research into incidents was done by a Stanford MBA student? Read that link, please.

What’s wrong with this picture of oversight? Fixing the Care.com background checking fiasco will take ‘more than babysitting money.’ No kidding. It will take vote-with-their feet feedback from the firm’s investors and especially the customers. It will take acknowledgement of the care worker shortage and how to address it. Next we should examine what a ‘marketplace’ actually is. Can it really be a repository in which the managers (not unlike what’s been going on with Facebook lately) have no idea what is going on inside until someone reports a major problem, but not before the news media has discovered it?  Imagine if supermarkets or department stores had no idea of the source of the items they brought onto shelves.  Content for an auction or a marketplace is all about representation and verification of authenticity. 

The Care.com disaster is a wakeup call – who watches the watchers?  It’s time to remake the case for cameras in senior care. Only eight states have authorized families to install them in nursing homes. And in assisted living communities, rules are set within states – just this year, a Minnesota family has been fighting to be allowed to place a camera in the residence. This should be a national conversation – and it needs to apply to in-home care workers as well. When a disaster happens, as with the death of Hollywood Hills nursing home residents, there can be an attempt to prevent future disasters by introducing new mandates for generators.  Yet a year or more later, two-thirds of Florida’s nursing homes have not complied (yet).

But generators are expensive – cameras are cheap.  The projected costs for generators in Florida, $121 million for nursing homes, $243 million for assisted living, are steep. But IP cameras for assisted living, home care, or skilled nursing homes?   At $38/camera for each of 1 million assisted living units in the US – that’s just over $38 million for all the units, assuming there is even a single organization that could purchase them and no organization to lobby against it. But what if it was an item on the required list at move-in? What if placing a home care worker (or babysitter) with a family required the family to have a working camera in the home? Cameras are there to enable a family member to see what’s going on – but even more important, for a worker to know that the standard of care in that home includes the presence of a camera. Cameras don’t guarantee better care — but no camera is a guarantee that the quality of the care at any given time is unrecorded and therefore not known until it may be too late.

Source https://www.ageinplacetech.com/blog/it-s-time-cameras-nursing-homes-assisted-living-and-home-care

Where the baby (or elderly family member) may be.  The WSJ investigation of Care.com has only added a level of urgency about the risky business of finding and placing caregivers in homes. Consider the Care.com CEO’s egregious assertion that “Care.com is a marketplace platform, like Indeed or LinkedIn.”  Really, finding someone to watch your baby or your aging father is analogous to finding a worker to fill a job opening in your IT department or seeking a manager to fill out your org chart? And having nasty problems with convicted criminals taking on caregiving roles, with deaths occurring in multiple states, but never aggregated into a nationwide picture of a horror show, until research into incidents was done by a Stanford MBA student? Read that link, please.

What’s wrong with this picture of oversight? Fixing the Care.com background checking fiasco will take ‘more than babysitting money.’ No kidding. It will take vote-with-their feet feedback from the firm’s investors and especially the customers. It will take acknowledgement of the care worker shortage and how to address it. Next we should examine what a ‘marketplace’ actually is. Can it really be a repository in which the managers (not unlike what’s been going on with Facebook lately) have no idea what is going on inside until someone reports a major problem, but not before the news media has discovered it?  Imagine if supermarkets or department stores had no idea of the source of the items they brought onto shelves.  Content for an auction or a marketplace is all about representation and verification of authenticity. 

The Care.com disaster is a wakeup call – who watches the watchers?  It’s time to remake the case for cameras in senior care. Only eight states have authorized families to install them in nursing homes. And in assisted living communities, rules are set within states – just this year, a Minnesota family has been fighting to be allowed to place a camera in the residence. This should be a national conversation – and it needs to apply to in-home care workers as well. When a disaster happens, as with the death of Hollywood Hills nursing home residents, there can be an attempt to prevent future disasters by introducing new mandates for generators.  Yet a year or more later, two-thirds of Florida’s nursing homes have not complied (yet).

But generators are expensive – cameras are cheap.  The projected costs for generators in Florida, $121 million for nursing homes, $243 million for assisted living, are steep. But IP cameras for assisted living, home care, or skilled nursing homes?   At $38/camera for each of 1 million assisted living units in the US – that’s just over $38 million for all the units, assuming there is even a single organization that could purchase them and no organization to lobby against it. But what if it was an item on the required list at move-in? What if placing a home care worker (or babysitter) with a family required the family to have a working camera in the home? Cameras are there to enable a family member to see what’s going on – but even more important, for a worker to know that the standard of care in that home includes the presence of a camera. Cameras don’t guarantee better care — but no camera is a guarantee that the quality of the care at any given time is unrecorded and therefore not known until it may be too late.

Can You Die From Dementia?

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/599862142/0/griswoldhomecare~Can-You-Die-From-Dementia/

Depressed Senior Man With Dementia

Can You Die From Dementia?

When you think of dementia, symptoms like memory loss and disorientation are probably what come to mind. If that’s the case, it may surprise you to learn that Alzheimer’s and dementia is actually the sixth leading cause of death in the US. So, how do you die from dementia? The answer actually depends on a wide variety of factors.

The Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Between different people and different types of dementia, you’ll find different patterns of decline. For some, confusion and disorientation may be among the first symptoms to appear. For others, it could be changes in communication or judgement. With these changes can come depression, further complicating matters.
No matter how it begins, the list keeps growing. Symptoms expand to include memory impairments, hallucinations, sleep issues, changes in personality, and more. The road may be different, but most cases of dementia have the same destination.
During the late stages, a person is rendered unable to perform the daily activities of life, and they require around the clock care. Sometimes 24 hour care is not enough. For instance, even with adequate care, difficulty swallowing can gradually lead to malnutrition, which causes weight loss and increases our vulnerability to infection.

Increased Vulnerability to Health Risks

What do dementia patients die from, exactly? For most people with late stage Alzheimer’s disease, medical complications are the most common cause of death. Dying from dementia is often due to a suppressed immune system, leading to a fatal infection. Even if an infection is avoided, blood clots may develop related to long periods of immobility.
Studying death and dementia is difficult because dementia is not always listed as the cause of death. According to the best available data, approximately 63% of dementia deaths are linked to circulatory issues. Another 26% are linked to respiratory system diseases. The remainder are a collection of many miscellaneous causes, ranging from digestive diseases to cancer.
Then how do people die from dementia when complications are not directly responsible? Remember, dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease is progressive. Even if medical complications can be avoided, the deterioration of the brain never stops. As dementia progresses, communication between the brain and body will eventually cease. Essential organs stop functioning, and even breathing independently may become impossible.

Looking After Loved Ones with Dementia

Alzheimer’s and dementia is eventually fatal, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do about it. The progression of the disease can be slowed with regular exercise. As dementia gradually progresses, you can explore new activities to help stimulate Alzheimer’s patients, or a number of similar proven techniques for improving their mood and sense of well-being.
And with preparation, caregivers can learn to reduce the risk of many health problems associated with dementia. Exploring the link between dementia and depression in seniors may be a good place to begin. In any case, there are always ways to be proactive. When it comes to quality of life, providing a supportive environment for your loved ones can make all the difference in the world.

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/599862142/0/griswoldhomecare~Can-You-Die-From-Dementia/

Depressed Senior Man With Dementia

Can You Die From Dementia?

When you think of dementia, symptoms like memory loss and disorientation are probably what come to mind. If that’s the case, it may surprise you to learn that Alzheimer’s and dementia is actually the sixth leading cause of death in the US. So, how do you die from dementia? The answer actually depends on a wide variety of factors.

The Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Between different people and different types of dementia, you’ll find different patterns of decline. For some, confusion and disorientation may be among the first symptoms to appear. For others, it could be changes in communication or judgement. With these changes can come depression, further complicating matters.
No matter how it begins, the list keeps growing. Symptoms expand to include memory impairments, hallucinations, sleep issues, changes in personality, and more. The road may be different, but most cases of dementia have the same destination.
During the late stages, a person is rendered unable to perform the daily activities of life, and they require around the clock care. Sometimes 24 hour care is not enough. For instance, even with adequate care, difficulty swallowing can gradually lead to malnutrition, which causes weight loss and increases our vulnerability to infection.

Increased Vulnerability to Health Risks

What do dementia patients die from, exactly? For most people with late stage Alzheimer’s disease, medical complications are the most common cause of death. Dying from dementia is often due to a suppressed immune system, leading to a fatal infection. Even if an infection is avoided, blood clots may develop related to long periods of immobility.
Studying death and dementia is difficult because dementia is not always listed as the cause of death. According to the best available data, approximately 63% of dementia deaths are linked to circulatory issues. Another 26% are linked to respiratory system diseases. The remainder are a collection of many miscellaneous causes, ranging from digestive diseases to cancer.
Then how do people die from dementia when complications are not directly responsible? Remember, dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease is progressive. Even if medical complications can be avoided, the deterioration of the brain never stops. As dementia progresses, communication between the brain and body will eventually cease. Essential organs stop functioning, and even breathing independently may become impossible.

Looking After Loved Ones with Dementia

Alzheimer’s and dementia is eventually fatal, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do about it. The progression of the disease can be slowed with regular exercise. As dementia gradually progresses, you can explore new activities to help stimulate Alzheimer’s patients, or a number of similar proven techniques for improving their mood and sense of well-being.
And with preparation, caregivers can learn to reduce the risk of many health problems associated with dementia. Exploring the link between dementia and depression in seniors may be a good place to begin. In any case, there are always ways to be proactive. When it comes to quality of life, providing a supportive environment for your loved ones can make all the difference in the world.