Wildfire Victims Get More Time for Medicare Enrollment

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/medicare-insurance/info-2018/enrollment-extended-california-wildfires.html

California wildfire victim Marsha Maus looks over her charred belongings. … Medicare beneficiaries who have been displaced or are recovering from the deadly wildfires in California will get more ……

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/medicare-insurance/info-2018/enrollment-extended-california-wildfires.html

California wildfire victim Marsha Maus looks over her charred belongings. … Medicare beneficiaries who have been displaced or are recovering from the deadly wildfires in California will get more ……

When Life is a Raging Dumpster Fire, Lead With Your Ass

Source https://www.niashanks.com/life-raging-dumpster-fire/

when life is a raging dumpster fire, lead with your ass

Would you rather listen to this article? Use the player below or download on iTunes.
Advice is overrated. And often unwelcome.

Wisdom gained from personal experience, in my opinion, is much more valuable. That’s why I love the following excerpt — it reveals a pragmatic approach to how a woman puts out the raging dumpster fires that life hurls in her path:

“Change doesn’t happen in my life by listening to the shit in my head. Change in my life is led by my ass. If my ass goes to the gym and gets it done, my life gets just a teeny bit better. Maybe I won’t even notice. But if my ass keeps going, one day I turn around, and my body is strong, and I’m just a little happier. This is also how I got out of the dumpster fire phase in my life. I put my ass in new places, and avoided the people, places and things that were terrible for me.” (This insight comes courtesy of Dr. Mary — a strong, wise, witty woman who has crushed both Beautiful Badass Courses.)

Lead with your ass.

It’s a simple message, but it’s a powerful message. A message that can be applied to health and fitness, but also life itself, and the many challenges that come with being a human living on this planet.

I particularly love the focus it puts on action and not always giving in to the nonsense that can pulse through our brains. Action triumphs over mental resistance.

Every single one of us has moments when our brains seem to be working against us instead of helping us achieve our goals, or at the very least fails to prod us to do the things that are good for us. I’m no exception, and I’d like to share a couple conversations between my brain, and ass.

My brain: “Nia, I don’t feel like working out today. Let’s try to do the least amount of activity possible, sit on the couch with a gigantic tub of ice cream, and dig in with a jumbo-sized serving spoon for maximum ice cream to mouth efficiency.”

My ass: “Hey, Nia. Don’t listen to your brain today — she’s a bit cranky. Let me take the lead. Let’s just get a workout started, and once you get going, you know you’ll crush it. At the very least, you’ll feel better afterward.”

Leading with my ass, in this case, will be the productive option.

Here’s another delightful scenario.

My brain: “Nia, you can’t do this. It’s too challenging. What if you fail? What will people think of you? You really shouldn’t do this because you can’t know for sure how it’ll turn out.”

My ass: “Shut up, brain. If this is important, then all you can do is put in your best effort. Let’s get to work. Let’s take action. Let’s get the first few steps behind us and build momentum, and then the brain will get on board, too.”

Ass — 2. Brain — 0.

Sometimes my brain leads me in the right direction. Sometimes, she’s an uncooperative tyrant who would rather dive face first in a kiddie pool of fire ants than do something productive.

Moral of the story: if your brain isn’t cooperating with your objectives, put your ass in charge and do something.

The post When Life is a Raging Dumpster Fire, Lead With Your Ass appeared first on Nia Shanks.

Source https://www.niashanks.com/life-raging-dumpster-fire/

when life is a raging dumpster fire, lead with your ass

Would you rather listen to this article? Use the player below or download on iTunes.
Advice is overrated. And often unwelcome.

Wisdom gained from personal experience, in my opinion, is much more valuable. That’s why I love the following excerpt — it reveals a pragmatic approach to how a woman puts out the raging dumpster fires that life hurls in her path:

“Change doesn’t happen in my life by listening to the shit in my head. Change in my life is led by my ass. If my ass goes to the gym and gets it done, my life gets just a teeny bit better. Maybe I won’t even notice. But if my ass keeps going, one day I turn around, and my body is strong, and I’m just a little happier. This is also how I got out of the dumpster fire phase in my life. I put my ass in new places, and avoided the people, places and things that were terrible for me.” (This insight comes courtesy of Dr. Mary — a strong, wise, witty woman who has crushed both Beautiful Badass Courses.)

Lead with your ass.

It’s a simple message, but it’s a powerful message. A message that can be applied to health and fitness, but also life itself, and the many challenges that come with being a human living on this planet.

I particularly love the focus it puts on action and not always giving in to the nonsense that can pulse through our brains. Action triumphs over mental resistance.

Every single one of us has moments when our brains seem to be working against us instead of helping us achieve our goals, or at the very least fails to prod us to do the things that are good for us. I’m no exception, and I’d like to share a couple conversations between my brain, and ass.

My brain: “Nia, I don’t feel like working out today. Let’s try to do the least amount of activity possible, sit on the couch with a gigantic tub of ice cream, and dig in with a jumbo-sized serving spoon for maximum ice cream to mouth efficiency.”

My ass: “Hey, Nia. Don’t listen to your brain today — she’s a bit cranky. Let me take the lead. Let’s just get a workout started, and once you get going, you know you’ll crush it. At the very least, you’ll feel better afterward.”

Leading with my ass, in this case, will be the productive option.

Here’s another delightful scenario.

My brain: “Nia, you can’t do this. It’s too challenging. What if you fail? What will people think of you? You really shouldn’t do this because you can’t know for sure how it’ll turn out.”

My ass: “Shut up, brain. If this is important, then all you can do is put in your best effort. Let’s get to work. Let’s take action. Let’s get the first few steps behind us and build momentum, and then the brain will get on board, too.”

Ass — 2. Brain — 0.

Sometimes my brain leads me in the right direction. Sometimes, she’s an uncooperative tyrant who would rather dive face first in a kiddie pool of fire ants than do something productive.

Moral of the story: if your brain isn’t cooperating with your objectives, put your ass in charge and do something.

The post When Life is a Raging Dumpster Fire, Lead With Your Ass appeared first on Nia Shanks.

Study: Vapers May Prompt Smokers to Quit

Source: https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/news/20181116/study-vapers-may-prompt-smokers-to-quit?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Smokers who regularly spent time with e-cigarette users (vapers) were about 20 percent more likely to be highly motivated to quit and to have made a recent quit attempt, a new study finds.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/news/20181116/study-vapers-may-prompt-smokers-to-quit?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Smokers who regularly spent time with e-cigarette users (vapers) were about 20 percent more likely to be highly motivated to quit and to have made a recent quit attempt, a new study finds.

Principles for responsible international investment in food and agriculture

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2018/11/principles-for-responsible-international-investment-in-food-and-agriculture/

The Committee on World Food Security of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization has a report out on this topic, well worth pondering.

 

Sustainability, respect, safety, health, transparency, accountability—all good ideas.  The trick is to put them into practice.

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2018/11/principles-for-responsible-international-investment-in-food-and-agriculture/

The Committee on World Food Security of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization has a report out on this topic, well worth pondering.

 

Sustainability, respect, safety, health, transparency, accountability—all good ideas.  The trick is to put them into practice.

One Simple Hack to Stop Screwing Yourself Over

Source https://www.niashanks.com/one-simple-hack-stop-screwing/

one simple hack to stop screwing yourself over

Would you rather listen to this article? Use the player below or download on iTunes.
The One Simple Hack part of the title either piqued your interest, or triggered your potential-bullshit alarm. Simply writing it induced a bit of nausea for me since most “hacks” are overused, regurgitated phrases filled with empty promises. Or they’re just stupid. This simple hack, I’m relieved to say, is neither.

When it comes to fat loss, or practically anything pertaining to body transforming, most proposed “hacks” are complete rubbish. They make promises like “fix trouble spots fast” or “build your dream body in only 30 days.” You’re tempted with tales of secret methods and shortcuts used by the pros. While these hacks sound incredible, they typically fall short in delivery.

But there is one simple hack that does work. One simple hack to stop screwing yourself over and, thereby, allowing you to achieve your goals: “If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging,” declares the wisdom of what’s known as The Law of Holes.

Put another, less polite, way — don’t make things worse, ya dummy.

Sound advice we typically don’t follow. I don’t know about you, but I have, on more occasions than I’d like to admit, not only continued digging once I’ve found myself in a hole, but start digging faster and with a larger shovel.

How many times have you “found yourself in a hole” but kept shoveling away, thereby digging yourself progressively deeper?

If I was a betting woman, I’d double-down and say you’ve experienced at least one of the following scenarios. Let’s see how I do …

The “I’ll Start Over Monday” Hole Digger

You skipped today’s workout because you just didn’t feel like doing it. Rather than going home to eat a nourishing, protein-rich, minimally processed meal, you rationalized: It’s Friday, it’s been a long week, I already screwed up by skipping my workout, so I’m going to grab a burger, fries, and large shake on the way home (digging deeper). You proceed to spend the weekend eating whatever you want and not working out and vow to start over Monday because, I mean, who “gets back on track” on a Saturday or Sunday? (Digging even deeper — I guess that would be deeper-er.)

The “My Workout Sucked, Now I’m Pissed” Hole Digger

You enter the gym feeling great, ready to crush your workout. Things go bad starting with the warm-up — the weights feel heavier than usual, your form doesn’t feel smooth, and everything feels terrible. In short, the workout sucked. Appalled at your inability to improve your performance (digging deeper*) you stomp out of the gym and soothe your throbbing disgust with a brownie the size of your face (digging even deeper).

*How is being appalled at yourself digging the hole deeper? Responding emotionally to a bad workout, or a not-so-great food choice, is the first step to making less than ideal choices going forward. If you shrug off a bad workout as nothing more than a bad workout, you can put the event behind you, move forward and focus on what you can do that’s in your best interest. (E.g., My workout sucked, and that’s okay because it’s inevitable. I’ll go home, have a good meal, and take it easy the rest of the evening.)

The “I Ate a Cupcake, So I’m Gonna Eat 14 More” Hole Digger

You breezed through your new diet the past couple weeks, but your resolve to avoid “bad foods” was tested by your favorite cupcakes someone brought to work. You rationalize: I’ve been good for so long, I deserve to be bad. Immediately after eating it, you’re struck with guilt. You proceed to eat two more cupcakes (digging deeper). Since you really screwed up, it’s time to dig even deeper, but a mere shovel won’t suffice. You go full-on excavator mode and continue making less than ideal food choices for every meal until you can “go all in” on the diet once again.

(Note: this is why you shouldn’t label foods “good” or “bad” — and why that diet didn’t work for you.)

How’d I do? Could you identify with at least one — or all three — of those scenarios? I can, because I’ve experienced each one, multiple times.

To be clear, I’m not saying that missing a workout, having a terrible workout, or eating a cupcake is bad. The problem is that we interpret these instances as something bad, or a “screw up.” Then we compound the negative experience with not-so-great choices going forward.

Skipping a workout won’t help you reach your strength goals, but it’s not detrimental either; it happens. Eating a humongous cupcake won’t help your fat loss efforts if it puts you in a caloric surplus, but it’s a single event that won’t have an immediate effect. Skipping a workout and eating a cupcake aren’t moral judgements — these things don’t make you a bad person (just like performing a workout and not eating a cupcake don’t make you a good person). The next logical step isn’t to skip another workout or devour four more cupcakes, because that would dig you in a hole.

If you skip a workout, perform the next one as soon as possible. If you eat a cupcake or overindulge, have a nourishing, real food meal next time you eat. These events don’t need to be a catalyst to frustration, guilt, or making less than ideal choices for a long period.

Just. Stop. Digging.

Funny how avoid this advice so naturally with things pertaining to health and fitness, but not in other areas of life. You don’t ding your car with the grocery cart and then take a sledgehammer to the windshield. You don’t stub your toe on the coffee table and then willingly head-butt the fridge. You don’t accidentally drop your dinner roll at a restaurant and then dump the bowl of soup on your head.

But when we “go off” our eating plan and overindulge? We use that as a valid reason to continue eating poorly for the rest of the day, or weekend. If we skip a workout because we were exhausted from a long day at work, we skip the remainder of the workouts for the entire week (and usual combine that with less than ideal foods choices, too). This is yet another uncomfortable truth about health and fitness.

Next time you find yourself in, or about to enter, a hole — recall this simple hack and don’t screw yourself over. Best of all, this is the simplest hack ever because it requires you to do absolutely nothing.

We don’t always need to be more disciplined or motivated, or even apologetic when we get off track or willingly make less than ideal choices. We just need to stop digging.

Did you enjoy what you just read? Then make sure you never miss a thing — sign up below to join the newsletter. You’ll receive the Beautiful Badass Mini Course as a gift.

The post One Simple Hack to Stop Screwing Yourself Over appeared first on Nia Shanks.

Source https://www.niashanks.com/one-simple-hack-stop-screwing/

one simple hack to stop screwing yourself over

Would you rather listen to this article? Use the player below or download on iTunes.
The One Simple Hack part of the title either piqued your interest, or triggered your potential-bullshit alarm. Simply writing it induced a bit of nausea for me since most “hacks” are overused, regurgitated phrases filled with empty promises. Or they’re just stupid. This simple hack, I’m relieved to say, is neither.

When it comes to fat loss, or practically anything pertaining to body transforming, most proposed “hacks” are complete rubbish. They make promises like “fix trouble spots fast” or “build your dream body in only 30 days.” You’re tempted with tales of secret methods and shortcuts used by the pros. While these hacks sound incredible, they typically fall short in delivery.

But there is one simple hack that does work. One simple hack to stop screwing yourself over and, thereby, allowing you to achieve your goals: “If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging,” declares the wisdom of what’s known as The Law of Holes.

Put another, less polite, way — don’t make things worse, ya dummy.

Sound advice we typically don’t follow. I don’t know about you, but I have, on more occasions than I’d like to admit, not only continued digging once I’ve found myself in a hole, but start digging faster and with a larger shovel.

How many times have you “found yourself in a hole” but kept shoveling away, thereby digging yourself progressively deeper?

If I was a betting woman, I’d double-down and say you’ve experienced at least one of the following scenarios. Let’s see how I do …

The “I’ll Start Over Monday” Hole Digger

You skipped today’s workout because you just didn’t feel like doing it. Rather than going home to eat a nourishing, protein-rich, minimally processed meal, you rationalized: It’s Friday, it’s been a long week, I already screwed up by skipping my workout, so I’m going to grab a burger, fries, and large shake on the way home (digging deeper). You proceed to spend the weekend eating whatever you want and not working out and vow to start over Monday because, I mean, who “gets back on track” on a Saturday or Sunday? (Digging even deeper — I guess that would be deeper-er.)

The “My Workout Sucked, Now I’m Pissed” Hole Digger

You enter the gym feeling great, ready to crush your workout. Things go bad starting with the warm-up — the weights feel heavier than usual, your form doesn’t feel smooth, and everything feels terrible. In short, the workout sucked. Appalled at your inability to improve your performance (digging deeper*) you stomp out of the gym and soothe your throbbing disgust with a brownie the size of your face (digging even deeper).

*How is being appalled at yourself digging the hole deeper? Responding emotionally to a bad workout, or a not-so-great food choice, is the first step to making less than ideal choices going forward. If you shrug off a bad workout as nothing more than a bad workout, you can put the event behind you, move forward and focus on what you can do that’s in your best interest. (E.g., My workout sucked, and that’s okay because it’s inevitable. I’ll go home, have a good meal, and take it easy the rest of the evening.)

The “I Ate a Cupcake, So I’m Gonna Eat 14 More” Hole Digger

You breezed through your new diet the past couple weeks, but your resolve to avoid “bad foods” was tested by your favorite cupcakes someone brought to work. You rationalize: I’ve been good for so long, I deserve to be bad. Immediately after eating it, you’re struck with guilt. You proceed to eat two more cupcakes (digging deeper). Since you really screwed up, it’s time to dig even deeper, but a mere shovel won’t suffice. You go full-on excavator mode and continue making less than ideal food choices for every meal until you can “go all in” on the diet once again.

(Note: this is why you shouldn’t label foods “good” or “bad” — and why that diet didn’t work for you.)

How’d I do? Could you identify with at least one — or all three — of those scenarios? I can, because I’ve experienced each one, multiple times.

To be clear, I’m not saying that missing a workout, having a terrible workout, or eating a cupcake is bad. The problem is that we interpret these instances as something bad, or a “screw up.” Then we compound the negative experience with not-so-great choices going forward.

Skipping a workout won’t help you reach your strength goals, but it’s not detrimental either; it happens. Eating a humongous cupcake won’t help your fat loss efforts if it puts you in a caloric surplus, but it’s a single event that won’t have an immediate effect. Skipping a workout and eating a cupcake aren’t moral judgements — these things don’t make you a bad person (just like performing a workout and not eating a cupcake don’t make you a good person). The next logical step isn’t to skip another workout or devour four more cupcakes, because that would dig you in a hole.

If you skip a workout, perform the next one as soon as possible. If you eat a cupcake or overindulge, have a nourishing, real food meal next time you eat. These events don’t need to be a catalyst to frustration, guilt, or making less than ideal choices for a long period.

Just. Stop. Digging.

Funny how avoid this advice so naturally with things pertaining to health and fitness, but not in other areas of life. You don’t ding your car with the grocery cart and then take a sledgehammer to the windshield. You don’t stub your toe on the coffee table and then willingly head-butt the fridge. You don’t accidentally drop your dinner roll at a restaurant and then dump the bowl of soup on your head.

But when we “go off” our eating plan and overindulge? We use that as a valid reason to continue eating poorly for the rest of the day, or weekend. If we skip a workout because we were exhausted from a long day at work, we skip the remainder of the workouts for the entire week (and usual combine that with less than ideal foods choices, too). This is yet another uncomfortable truth about health and fitness.

Next time you find yourself in, or about to enter, a hole — recall this simple hack and don’t screw yourself over. Best of all, this is the simplest hack ever because it requires you to do absolutely nothing.

We don’t always need to be more disciplined or motivated, or even apologetic when we get off track or willingly make less than ideal choices. We just need to stop digging.

Did you enjoy what you just read? Then make sure you never miss a thing — sign up below to join the newsletter. You’ll receive the Beautiful Badass Mini Course as a gift.

The post One Simple Hack to Stop Screwing Yourself Over appeared first on Nia Shanks.

Heartburn Sucks—and These 11 Foods Make It Way Worse

Source https://greatist.com/eat/foods-that-cause-heartburn?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

The acidic taste in your throat. The fiery feeling in your chest. The chronic cough and difficulty swallowing. If you’re part of the 40 percent of Americans who suffer from regular heartburn, you know it feels pretty terrible.

The good (or bad) news is that about 95 percent of sufferers can trace their symptoms back to a particular food, meaning, with a little detective work, you can figure out what to eat and what to avoid. We’ve gone ahead and done some of the grunt work for you. Try to build a burn-free meal by avoiding these common foods that cause heartburn.

Foods That Cause Heartburn

1. Onions

Ah yes, we know that painful, stinky onion burp from hell all too well. Onions, while nutritious, contain a fermentable fiber called fructooligosaccharides, which may relax the lower esophageal sphincter and increase reflux.

One study compared people’s symptoms after consuming a burger with raw onions compared to one without and found that the onion-eaters had significantly more heartburn. Can’t imagine a burger without onions? We hear you. Just make sure to cook them well to break down those tough-on-the-gut fibers.

2. Booze

Yah, you saw that one coming. Much the same way a stiff drink relaxes you enough to help you kill it on the dancefloor, alcohol also relaxes that sphincter, triggering heartburn in the process.

While findings in this area are controversial and varied, many studies have found that drinking in excess may increase the risk of reflux, especially since excessive alcohol intake can directly damage the esophageal and gastric mucosal lining. It’s not surprising, then, that in a survey of heartburn sufferers, as many as 67 percent of respondents felt that booze was to blame. Guess it’s time to volunteer to be the DD!

3. Peppermint

Wait, wha? Isn’t peppermint a cooling herb? Peppermint is thought to reduce lower esophageal sphincter tension, which makes it easier for stomach acids to creep up. One study found that eight percent of heartburn patients reported complaints after consuming peppermint, and a large systematic review reported heartburn as one of the major side effects of peppermint consumption. Maybe stick to chamomile next time.

4. Chocolate

I know you didn’t want to see this on the list. Here’s the deal. Chocolate contains both caffeine and theobromine, both of which can cause the lower esophageal sphincter to relax and allow stomach acid to escape. One study also found that in comparison to a simple sugar solution, chocolate significantly increased heartburn symptoms within just an hour of indulging. Vanilla macaroons are in your future.

5. Salty Snacks

The research on salt and reflux is not really working in our favor. One study found that people who ate salted foods three times or more each week increased their risk of heartburn by up to 50 percent!

Another study found that risk of acid reflux increased as much as 70 percent in people who added salt to their food, suggesting that we could really stand to take the salt shaker off the table. Our suggestion? Skip the sodium and flavor your meals liberally with fresh herbs and spices instead.

6. Fatty Meats

Keto dieters, take note! Fat stimulates the release of the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which has been shown to relax the lower esophageal sphincter and cause reflux. It can also delay gastric emptying as fat is digested and absorbed slower than other foods, increasing the likelihood that stomach acids get up in our business.

One study looked at a wide range of dietary considerations and found that cholesterol, saturated animal fats, as well as fat, in general, were some of the most likely perceived culprits of reflux symptoms. Try working in a few extra meatless meals each week and choosing leaner cuts of meat, whenever possible.

7. Full-Fat Dairy

Like the richer cuts of meat, whole milk products (including cream, butter, and our beloved cheese) have become a notorious cause of heartburn. Interestingly, low-fat dairy doesn’t seem to have the same effect, so reach for non-fat or low-fat options if you find it bothers you.

8. Coffee

That morning joe doesn’t usually play so nicely with heartburn sufferers. While coffee may help perk you up, it actually may do the opposite to our esophageal functions, relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter and increasing the risk of reflux.

One report found that about one-quarter of heartburn sufferers found coffee caused them pain. Interestingly, the role in caffeine specifically in this association is largely unclear. While one study found a significant decline in heartburn symptoms with decaffeination, they also found that just adding caffeine to water didn’t cause the ill effects, signaling that there are likely other factors, like acidity, at play.

If you’re trying to wean yourself off, try choosing a low-acidity coffee while going half-caf, slowly shifting the caffeinated: decaf ratio until you’re fully coffee-free.

9. Bubbly Bevvies

Carbonated sodas are not only a common source of caffeine, but they also play a role in reflux by reducing lower esophageal pressure. The result? Lots of burning belches. Classy, we know. One study found that carbonated soda consumptions were one of the worst culprits of heartburn during sleep, and no one likes to be woken up by that! Try cutting back on your soda habit (for more reasons than one) and choosing flat water instead of bubbly.

10. Tomatoes

Bad news for our Italian-food-loving friends. With almost 70 percent of heartburn sufferers citing tomatoes or tomato juice as the cause, it’s not surprising that these antioxidant-rich babies made the list.

While tomato juice is notoriously acidic, one study found that patients experienced reflux symptoms even when the pH of the drink was adjusted to neutral. In other words, there are likely other components of tomato juice that cause the pain. Sad about missing pasta and pizza night? Go for a white pizza and olive oil-based pasta, or whip up a “red sauce” using bell peppers instead.

11. Citrus Juice

It’s starting to look like water might be the only safe drinking choice, right? Anyone who is prone to heartburn and reflux knows how easily a glass of freshly squeezed OJ can ruin an otherwise lovely Sunday brunch.

And is it really a huge surprise? With natural acidity, orange and grapefruit juices are among some of the biggest heartburn offenders, with 67 percent of one survey’s participants citing them as a literal pain. Another study found grapefruit juice to have the worst effect out of all other drinks and juices. If you love your citrus, try watering it down and adding a single shot to a tall glass of water.

Foods That Relieve Heartburn Symptoms

1. Gum

OK, technically not a food (so please, do not swallow a wad), but it seems that gum chewers may be onto something when it comes to heartburn prevention. Research has shown that chewing sugar-free bicarbonate gum can help increase saliva production and clear the esophagus of painful acids. We recommend keeping a pack handy in case any of the offending foods mentioned make it onto your plate (or you just can’t give up your morning cup of joe).

2. Whole-Grain Bread

Yay! Another great reason to eat more carbs! It seems that unlike fatty meats and dairy, high-fiber foods may have a protective role in reducing the risk of reflux. One study found that participants who ate higher fiber bread were twice as likely to relieve their heartburn symptoms than those who ate lower fiber bread.

While the exact rationale for this association is largely unknown, it’s believed that fiber reduces nitrites in the stomach that otherwise play a role in relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter. Here’s a little dietitian tip to help you get your 25-37 grams per day of fiber: When choosing a bread, look for one with at least 4 grams of fiber per serving.

3. Fruits and Vegetables

You know you don’t need another reason to get your fruit and veggie fix, but hey, here it goes. In addition to providing a healthy dose of that reflux-reducing fiber, produce also is rich in vitamins A, C, and E, which have a protective effect against reflux thanks to their antioxidant properties. Just be sure to avoid any of the higher acid veggies like oranges, lemons, citrus, and tomatoes.

Source https://greatist.com/eat/foods-that-cause-heartburn?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

The acidic taste in your throat. The fiery feeling in your chest. The chronic cough and difficulty swallowing. If you’re part of the 40 percent of Americans who suffer from regular heartburn, you know it feels pretty terrible.

The good (or bad) news is that about 95 percent of sufferers can trace their symptoms back to a particular food, meaning, with a little detective work, you can figure out what to eat and what to avoid. We’ve gone ahead and done some of the grunt work for you. Try to build a burn-free meal by avoiding these common foods that cause heartburn.

Foods That Cause Heartburn

1. Onions

Ah yes, we know that painful, stinky onion burp from hell all too well. Onions, while nutritious, contain a fermentable fiber called fructooligosaccharides, which may relax the lower esophageal sphincter and increase reflux.

One study compared people’s symptoms after consuming a burger with raw onions compared to one without and found that the onion-eaters had significantly more heartburn. Can’t imagine a burger without onions? We hear you. Just make sure to cook them well to break down those tough-on-the-gut fibers.

2. Booze

Yah, you saw that one coming. Much the same way a stiff drink relaxes you enough to help you kill it on the dancefloor, alcohol also relaxes that sphincter, triggering heartburn in the process.

While findings in this area are controversial and varied, many studies have found that drinking in excess may increase the risk of reflux, especially since excessive alcohol intake can directly damage the esophageal and gastric mucosal lining. It’s not surprising, then, that in a survey of heartburn sufferers, as many as 67 percent of respondents felt that booze was to blame. Guess it’s time to volunteer to be the DD!

3. Peppermint

Wait, wha? Isn’t peppermint a cooling herb? Peppermint is thought to reduce lower esophageal sphincter tension, which makes it easier for stomach acids to creep up. One study found that eight percent of heartburn patients reported complaints after consuming peppermint, and a large systematic review reported heartburn as one of the major side effects of peppermint consumption. Maybe stick to chamomile next time.

4. Chocolate

I know you didn’t want to see this on the list. Here’s the deal. Chocolate contains both caffeine and theobromine, both of which can cause the lower esophageal sphincter to relax and allow stomach acid to escape. One study also found that in comparison to a simple sugar solution, chocolate significantly increased heartburn symptoms within just an hour of indulging. Vanilla macaroons are in your future.

5. Salty Snacks

The research on salt and reflux is not really working in our favor. One study found that people who ate salted foods three times or more each week increased their risk of heartburn by up to 50 percent!

Another study found that risk of acid reflux increased as much as 70 percent in people who added salt to their food, suggesting that we could really stand to take the salt shaker off the table. Our suggestion? Skip the sodium and flavor your meals liberally with fresh herbs and spices instead.

6. Fatty Meats

Keto dieters, take note! Fat stimulates the release of the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which has been shown to relax the lower esophageal sphincter and cause reflux. It can also delay gastric emptying as fat is digested and absorbed slower than other foods, increasing the likelihood that stomach acids get up in our business.

One study looked at a wide range of dietary considerations and found that cholesterol, saturated animal fats, as well as fat, in general, were some of the most likely perceived culprits of reflux symptoms. Try working in a few extra meatless meals each week and choosing leaner cuts of meat, whenever possible.

7. Full-Fat Dairy

Like the richer cuts of meat, whole milk products (including cream, butter, and our beloved cheese) have become a notorious cause of heartburn. Interestingly, low-fat dairy doesn’t seem to have the same effect, so reach for non-fat or low-fat options if you find it bothers you.

8. Coffee

That morning joe doesn’t usually play so nicely with heartburn sufferers. While coffee may help perk you up, it actually may do the opposite to our esophageal functions, relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter and increasing the risk of reflux.

One report found that about one-quarter of heartburn sufferers found coffee caused them pain. Interestingly, the role in caffeine specifically in this association is largely unclear. While one study found a significant decline in heartburn symptoms with decaffeination, they also found that just adding caffeine to water didn’t cause the ill effects, signaling that there are likely other factors, like acidity, at play.

If you’re trying to wean yourself off, try choosing a low-acidity coffee while going half-caf, slowly shifting the caffeinated: decaf ratio until you’re fully coffee-free.

9. Bubbly Bevvies

Carbonated sodas are not only a common source of caffeine, but they also play a role in reflux by reducing lower esophageal pressure. The result? Lots of burning belches. Classy, we know. One study found that carbonated soda consumptions were one of the worst culprits of heartburn during sleep, and no one likes to be woken up by that! Try cutting back on your soda habit (for more reasons than one) and choosing flat water instead of bubbly.

10. Tomatoes

Bad news for our Italian-food-loving friends. With almost 70 percent of heartburn sufferers citing tomatoes or tomato juice as the cause, it’s not surprising that these antioxidant-rich babies made the list.

While tomato juice is notoriously acidic, one study found that patients experienced reflux symptoms even when the pH of the drink was adjusted to neutral. In other words, there are likely other components of tomato juice that cause the pain. Sad about missing pasta and pizza night? Go for a white pizza and olive oil-based pasta, or whip up a “red sauce” using bell peppers instead.

11. Citrus Juice

It’s starting to look like water might be the only safe drinking choice, right? Anyone who is prone to heartburn and reflux knows how easily a glass of freshly squeezed OJ can ruin an otherwise lovely Sunday brunch.

And is it really a huge surprise? With natural acidity, orange and grapefruit juices are among some of the biggest heartburn offenders, with 67 percent of one survey’s participants citing them as a literal pain. Another study found grapefruit juice to have the worst effect out of all other drinks and juices. If you love your citrus, try watering it down and adding a single shot to a tall glass of water.

Foods That Relieve Heartburn Symptoms

1. Gum

OK, technically not a food (so please, do not swallow a wad), but it seems that gum chewers may be onto something when it comes to heartburn prevention. Research has shown that chewing sugar-free bicarbonate gum can help increase saliva production and clear the esophagus of painful acids. We recommend keeping a pack handy in case any of the offending foods mentioned make it onto your plate (or you just can’t give up your morning cup of joe).

2. Whole-Grain Bread

Yay! Another great reason to eat more carbs! It seems that unlike fatty meats and dairy, high-fiber foods may have a protective role in reducing the risk of reflux. One study found that participants who ate higher fiber bread were twice as likely to relieve their heartburn symptoms than those who ate lower fiber bread.

While the exact rationale for this association is largely unknown, it’s believed that fiber reduces nitrites in the stomach that otherwise play a role in relaxing the lower esophageal sphincter. Here’s a little dietitian tip to help you get your 25-37 grams per day of fiber: When choosing a bread, look for one with at least 4 grams of fiber per serving.

3. Fruits and Vegetables

You know you don’t need another reason to get your fruit and veggie fix, but hey, here it goes. In addition to providing a healthy dose of that reflux-reducing fiber, produce also is rich in vitamins A, C, and E, which have a protective effect against reflux thanks to their antioxidant properties. Just be sure to avoid any of the higher acid veggies like oranges, lemons, citrus, and tomatoes.

Mixed reactions on the development of digital biomarkers and growth of Mindstrong Health

Source: https://sharpbrains.com/blog/2018/11/12/mixed-reactions-welcome-the-promising-development-of-digital-biomarkers-and-growth-of-mindstrong-health/

___

(More on the positive side, at MIT Technology Review) The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself:

“There are about 45 million people in the US alone with a mental illness, and those illnesses and their courses of treatment can vary tremendously. But there is something most of those people have in common: a smartphone

Mindstrong Health is using a smartphone app to collect measures of people’s cognition and emotional health as indicated by how they use their phones. Once a patient installs Mindstrong’s app, it monitors…

Source: https://sharpbrains.com/blog/2018/11/12/mixed-reactions-welcome-the-promising-development-of-digital-biomarkers-and-growth-of-mindstrong-health/

___

(More on the positive side, at MIT Technology Review) The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself:

“There are about 45 million people in the US alone with a mental illness, and those illnesses and their courses of treatment can vary tremendously. But there is something most of those people have in common: a smartphone

Mindstrong Health is using a smartphone app to collect measures of people’s cognition and emotional health as indicated by how they use their phones. Once a patient installs Mindstrong’s app, it monitors…

Having Poor Vision Can Raise Risk for Falls Among Older Adults

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/having-poor-vision-can-raise-risk-for-falls-among-older-adults/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Vision impairment and blindness affect one in 11 Americans age 65 and older. Because our population is aging, the number of older adults with vision problems is predicted to rise. Older adults who have impaired vision may be at risk for decreased independence, poorer well-being, and an increased risk of falls. For example, in any given year, approximately 30 percent of adults over age 65 will fall. Having impaired vision more than doubles this risk.

For older adults, falls are a major cause of illness and death. Even having a fear of falling is a challenge that can limit activity and worsen quality of life and independence as you age.

However, we don’t have much information on how often visually impaired older adults experience a fall, and we have even less information about what happens to them after a fall. A team of researchers suggested that we need this information in order to understand the scope of the problem and create ways to prevent falls in visually impaired older adults.

To learn more, the research team examined information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Their goal was to provide up-to-date information on the frequency of falls. The team also wanted to learn more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments.

Participants in the study were considered visually impaired if they had trouble recognizing someone across the street and/or reading newspaper print, even when using corrective lenses.

Falls were defined as “any fall, slip, or trip” that involved losing balance and landing on the floor or ground or at a lower level. Participants were asked if they had any fall in the past month and if they fell more than once in the past 12 months. Fear of falling was determined by asking participants if they had worried about falling down in the last month. An additional question asked whether worrying about falling ever caused participants to limit their activities.

The researchers also asked about the number of chronic conditions the participants had, including heart attack, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, lung disease, stroke, and cancer.

The researchers concluded that falls, fear of falling, and limiting activity were considerably more common among older adults who were visually impaired.

About 50 percent of people who said they had trouble seeing were afraid of falling and as a result, limited their activity. More than one in four older adults with vision problems had recurrent falls in the year before they were surveyed.

The researchers said their study suggested that taking steps to prevent falls for older adults with vision problems was important and could limit the harmful consequences of falls for older adults. What’s more, helping older adults prevent falls might also slow declines in well-being, quality of life, and independence associated with a fear of falling.

The researchers noted that vision impairment can be treated or even avoided in many cases, and they speculated that doing so might be a strategy to decrease falls and fall-related problems for some older adults with vision problems.

“We need more information about falls and the fear of falling in older adults with vision problems. This will help us design public health and clinical interventions to address some of the key consequences of vision loss for older adults,” said study co-author Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH.

This summary is from “Prevalence of Falls and Fall-Related Outcomes in Older Adults with Self-Reported Vision Impairment.” It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH; Shirin E. Hassan, BAppSc (Optom), PhD; and Brian C. Stagg, MD, MS.

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/having-poor-vision-can-raise-risk-for-falls-among-older-adults/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Vision impairment and blindness affect one in 11 Americans age 65 and older. Because our population is aging, the number of older adults with vision problems is predicted to rise. Older adults who have impaired vision may be at risk for decreased independence, poorer well-being, and an increased risk of falls. For example, in any given year, approximately 30 percent of adults over age 65 will fall. Having impaired vision more than doubles this risk.

For older adults, falls are a major cause of illness and death. Even having a fear of falling is a challenge that can limit activity and worsen quality of life and independence as you age.

However, we don’t have much information on how often visually impaired older adults experience a fall, and we have even less information about what happens to them after a fall. A team of researchers suggested that we need this information in order to understand the scope of the problem and create ways to prevent falls in visually impaired older adults.

To learn more, the research team examined information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Their goal was to provide up-to-date information on the frequency of falls. The team also wanted to learn more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments.

Participants in the study were considered visually impaired if they had trouble recognizing someone across the street and/or reading newspaper print, even when using corrective lenses.

Falls were defined as “any fall, slip, or trip” that involved losing balance and landing on the floor or ground or at a lower level. Participants were asked if they had any fall in the past month and if they fell more than once in the past 12 months. Fear of falling was determined by asking participants if they had worried about falling down in the last month. An additional question asked whether worrying about falling ever caused participants to limit their activities.

The researchers also asked about the number of chronic conditions the participants had, including heart attack, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, lung disease, stroke, and cancer.

The researchers concluded that falls, fear of falling, and limiting activity were considerably more common among older adults who were visually impaired.

About 50 percent of people who said they had trouble seeing were afraid of falling and as a result, limited their activity. More than one in four older adults with vision problems had recurrent falls in the year before they were surveyed.

The researchers said their study suggested that taking steps to prevent falls for older adults with vision problems was important and could limit the harmful consequences of falls for older adults. What’s more, helping older adults prevent falls might also slow declines in well-being, quality of life, and independence associated with a fear of falling.

The researchers noted that vision impairment can be treated or even avoided in many cases, and they speculated that doing so might be a strategy to decrease falls and fall-related problems for some older adults with vision problems.

“We need more information about falls and the fear of falling in older adults with vision problems. This will help us design public health and clinical interventions to address some of the key consequences of vision loss for older adults,” said study co-author Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH.

This summary is from “Prevalence of Falls and Fall-Related Outcomes in Older Adults with Self-Reported Vision Impairment.” It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH; Shirin E. Hassan, BAppSc (Optom), PhD; and Brian C. Stagg, MD, MS.

Omega-3 Supplements May Reduce Heart Attack Risk

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2018/fish-oil-heart-health.html

Getty Images … The latest word on two of the most popular dietary supplements is a weighty one: Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers over the weekend released results of the largest randomize……

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2018/fish-oil-heart-health.html

Getty Images … The latest word on two of the most popular dietary supplements is a weighty one: Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers over the weekend released results of the largest randomize……

First Brand Named in Turkey Salmonella Outbreak

Source: https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/food-poisoning/news/20181116/first-brand-named-in-turkey-salmonella-outbreak?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Jenni-O turkey

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and other regulatory agencies have not released the names of any other companies involved.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/food-poisoning/news/20181116/first-brand-named-in-turkey-salmonella-outbreak?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Jenni-O turkey

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and other regulatory agencies have not released the names of any other companies involved.