30 Days to Brain Play: Day 16 | Think Faster

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/30-days-to-brain-play-day16/

Welcome to Day 16 of our 30 Days To Brain Play, a daily brain boosting workout targeting attention, quick thinking, nimbleness, memory and problem solving. Each daily challenge is especially chosen by us to give you a fun, fast way to begin the new year on the track to better cognitive fitness.

Think Faster

<span styl…

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/30-days-to-brain-play-day16/

Welcome to Day 16 of our 30 Days To Brain Play, a daily brain boosting workout targeting attention, quick thinking, nimbleness, memory and problem solving. Each daily challenge is especially chosen by us to give you a fun, fast way to begin the new year on the track to better cognitive fitness.

Think Faster

<span styl…

35 Ways to Live Your Life So You Can Die Happy

Source https://greatist.com/live/life-advice-die-happy?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

<!–[if IE 9]>

<!–[if IE 9]><![endif]–>



<!–


Earlier this month, I turned 35. The way NYE celebrations coincide so closely with my birthday always leads me to think closely about about the new year (and kicking it off at a new age!), as well as all the years that have led to this present moment.

I also do this weird thing where I double my current age in my mind and think, Where am I halfway to? This year, the answer is 70. Halfway to 70! I think that’s pretty cool, and I know that the next 35 years will fly faster than the last—as you get older, each year represents a smaller percentage of your overall life. That’s why the first 20 years of your life always seem the longest.


EDITOR'S PICK
{{displayTitle}}

Here’s what I’ve learned over the last 35 years that has me heading into the next 35 regret-free:

  1. Be spontaneous. We got our dog, little Coconut, unexpectedly one weekend with zero plans to be dog owners (and while living in a non-pet friendly place)! Yeah, we had to move and make some life adjustments, but nine years later, she’s still the joy of our lives!
  2. Go all in. Working too much gets a bad rap (and yes, balance, family, and friends matter), but there’ll be periods in your life where you live and breathe work. If you care about what you’re doing, it’s a wonderful investment. My work is the greatest contribution I’ll make in my lifetime.
  3. Be there for the unglam stuff too. People love weddings. But do you go to funerals—even if they’re hard to get to?
  4. Say sorry first. Who cares who is in the wrong? In two weeks, you won’t even remember the fight. Choose kindness over being right. You won’t waste time sulking either.
  5. Get up earlier. So much precious life is wasted by over-sleeping. Enjoy the magical mornings at 5 a.m. once in a while!
  6. Just go for it. A little over nine years ago, when I was 25, I had my first-ever interview job in New York. I wore a white blazer (I didn’t know the Labor Day rule back then!), and I remember how bitingly cold it was compared to the Sydney summer I’d left behind. I was so desperate to “make it” in New York. But I didn’t have a college degree or any connections in America. I had one important (often underestimated) thing, though: self-confidence. And this generated a couple of other cool side effects: an Olympian level of optimism, no matter how many times I was rejected (which was a lot). And massive action. And ya know what? It was enough. Because it’s remarkable what self-confidence will do for you. It means what “they” say doesn’t apply to you. Go for the damn thing you want!
  7. Smile more… when it feels good. People who smile are the best. And it makes you look sexy too. (Just don’t tell a stranger to smile, please.)
  8. Just go! Do you hem and haw over whether or not to go to something? Me too. But 90 percent of the time I do go (like to a book launch event, a masquerade party, on a bit of an inconvenient girls’ trip), I’m so happy I did. Even if you feel like staying home—show up for more!
  9. Call your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good.
  10. Don’t believe all your thoughts. Thoughts are just thoughts, and they can be changed. Be lighter about them!
  11. Risk more. Why hold back? The purpose of life isn’t to make it through unscathed (“here lies someone who had a jolly, safe time”). See the world! Commit to something! Speak up!
  12. Wear stuff that makes you feel fabulous. You’re worth it! And it’s OK to stand out.
  13. Don’t expect other people to see things the way you do. And once a week, consume a blog or podcast in direct opposition to your beliefs (religious, political, anything). Cognitive empathy is strengthened this way.
  14. Add—don’t subtract! The universe is one of inclusion. What we think about expands. So instead of subtracting fries, add salad. Instead of subtracting a toxic friend, add more time with a positive friend. Adding naturally dulls the rest out!
  15. Don’t resist those down days. What we resist persists. Sit with it. Be curious about feeling low. It’s more likely to pass this way. And you’re allowed a time out.
  16. Don’t think your job is your only creative expression. Got other skills? Start a side hustle!
  17. Spend a day a week with your phone in a drawer. There was a time without phones, ya know. We all lived.
  18. Tell yourself you are beautiful. Because you are. Photos you’ll look at 10 years from now will have you thinking, I was so cute!
  19. Give someone the benefit of the doubt. You’ve been given it way more than you realize.
  20. Get outside for 10 minutes a day. Put your hand on a tree. Look at a flower for 15 seconds. And look up at the sky, not down at a screen.
  21. Cherish your beloved. See the things you want to see in that person. Praise them. Give encouragement! Your life partner is the most precious thing in your life.
  22. Laugh over being offended. This is what happy people do.
  23. Follow your instincts. No one knows what’s in your heart but you.
  24. Be responsible for your decisions. Don’t blame others for what goes wrong for you. This is the most freeing thing you’ll ever do!
  25. Think about stuff that makes you happy. And do it a lot. This makes you a magnet for more happy stuff.
  26. Lovingly release people who don’t appreciate you. That way, you’ll make room for people who will.
  27. Don’t blend in. Losing yourself is all too easy. And people are more than happy for you to just follow their lead.
  28. Stand up for yourself. You’ll know when it’s time.
  29. Forgive everybody. And never hurt anyone intentionally.
  30. Visualize everything going the way you want. The mind doesn’t know the difference. It’s what the top athletes do for a reason. They win mentally first.
  31. Don’t point out anyone’s mistakes (unless they’re about to run a red light)! If you have to, do it indirectly. No one likes to be wrong, and it won’t win you any friends.
  32. Decide that change is always a good thing. It’s the only sure thing in life.
  33. Know that money will flow to you. Look around! You’re always being supported.
  34. Give 10X more compliments. Why hold back? There’s no point! It’s surprising what a kind, sincere word can do for someone.
  35. Relax. Because everything’s gonna be OK.

Susie Moore is Greatist’s life coach columnist and a confidence coach in New York City. Sign up for free weekly wellness tips on her website and check back every Tuesday for her latest No Regrets column!

Source https://greatist.com/live/life-advice-die-happy?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=feed_https–greatistcom–

<!–[if IE 9]>

<!–[if IE 9]><![endif]–>



<!–


Earlier this month, I turned 35. The way NYE celebrations coincide so closely with my birthday always leads me to think closely about about the new year (and kicking it off at a new age!), as well as all the years that have led to this present moment.

I also do this weird thing where I double my current age in my mind and think, Where am I halfway to? This year, the answer is 70. Halfway to 70! I think that’s pretty cool, and I know that the next 35 years will fly faster than the last—as you get older, each year represents a smaller percentage of your overall life. That’s why the first 20 years of your life always seem the longest.


EDITOR'S PICK
{{displayTitle}}

Here’s what I’ve learned over the last 35 years that has me heading into the next 35 regret-free:

  1. Be spontaneous. We got our dog, little Coconut, unexpectedly one weekend with zero plans to be dog owners (and while living in a non-pet friendly place)! Yeah, we had to move and make some life adjustments, but nine years later, she’s still the joy of our lives!
  2. Go all in. Working too much gets a bad rap (and yes, balance, family, and friends matter), but there’ll be periods in your life where you live and breathe work. If you care about what you’re doing, it’s a wonderful investment. My work is the greatest contribution I’ll make in my lifetime.
  3. Be there for the unglam stuff too. People love weddings. But do you go to funerals—even if they’re hard to get to?
  4. Say sorry first. Who cares who is in the wrong? In two weeks, you won’t even remember the fight. Choose kindness over being right. You won’t waste time sulking either.
  5. Get up earlier. So much precious life is wasted by over-sleeping. Enjoy the magical mornings at 5 a.m. once in a while!
  6. Just go for it. A little over nine years ago, when I was 25, I had my first-ever interview job in New York. I wore a white blazer (I didn’t know the Labor Day rule back then!), and I remember how bitingly cold it was compared to the Sydney summer I’d left behind. I was so desperate to “make it” in New York. But I didn’t have a college degree or any connections in America. I had one important (often underestimated) thing, though: self-confidence. And this generated a couple of other cool side effects: an Olympian level of optimism, no matter how many times I was rejected (which was a lot). And massive action. And ya know what? It was enough. Because it’s remarkable what self-confidence will do for you. It means what “they” say doesn’t apply to you. Go for the damn thing you want!
  7. Smile more… when it feels good. People who smile are the best. And it makes you look sexy too. (Just don’t tell a stranger to smile, please.)
  8. Just go! Do you hem and haw over whether or not to go to something? Me too. But 90 percent of the time I do go (like to a book launch event, a masquerade party, on a bit of an inconvenient girls’ trip), I’m so happy I did. Even if you feel like staying home—show up for more!
  9. Call your parents. You never know when they’ll be gone for good.
  10. Don’t believe all your thoughts. Thoughts are just thoughts, and they can be changed. Be lighter about them!
  11. Risk more. Why hold back? The purpose of life isn’t to make it through unscathed (“here lies someone who had a jolly, safe time”). See the world! Commit to something! Speak up!
  12. Wear stuff that makes you feel fabulous. You’re worth it! And it’s OK to stand out.
  13. Don’t expect other people to see things the way you do. And once a week, consume a blog or podcast in direct opposition to your beliefs (religious, political, anything). Cognitive empathy is strengthened this way.
  14. Add—don’t subtract! The universe is one of inclusion. What we think about expands. So instead of subtracting fries, add salad. Instead of subtracting a toxic friend, add more time with a positive friend. Adding naturally dulls the rest out!
  15. Don’t resist those down days. What we resist persists. Sit with it. Be curious about feeling low. It’s more likely to pass this way. And you’re allowed a time out.
  16. Don’t think your job is your only creative expression. Got other skills? Start a side hustle!
  17. Spend a day a week with your phone in a drawer. There was a time without phones, ya know. We all lived.
  18. Tell yourself you are beautiful. Because you are. Photos you’ll look at 10 years from now will have you thinking, I was so cute!
  19. Give someone the benefit of the doubt. You’ve been given it way more than you realize.
  20. Get outside for 10 minutes a day. Put your hand on a tree. Look at a flower for 15 seconds. And look up at the sky, not down at a screen.
  21. Cherish your beloved. See the things you want to see in that person. Praise them. Give encouragement! Your life partner is the most precious thing in your life.
  22. Laugh over being offended. This is what happy people do.
  23. Follow your instincts. No one knows what’s in your heart but you.
  24. Be responsible for your decisions. Don’t blame others for what goes wrong for you. This is the most freeing thing you’ll ever do!
  25. Think about stuff that makes you happy. And do it a lot. This makes you a magnet for more happy stuff.
  26. Lovingly release people who don’t appreciate you. That way, you’ll make room for people who will.
  27. Don’t blend in. Losing yourself is all too easy. And people are more than happy for you to just follow their lead.
  28. Stand up for yourself. You’ll know when it’s time.
  29. Forgive everybody. And never hurt anyone intentionally.
  30. Visualize everything going the way you want. The mind doesn’t know the difference. It’s what the top athletes do for a reason. They win mentally first.
  31. Don’t point out anyone’s mistakes (unless they’re about to run a red light)! If you have to, do it indirectly. No one likes to be wrong, and it won’t win you any friends.
  32. Decide that change is always a good thing. It’s the only sure thing in life.
  33. Know that money will flow to you. Look around! You’re always being supported.
  34. Give 10X more compliments. Why hold back? There’s no point! It’s surprising what a kind, sincere word can do for someone.
  35. Relax. Because everything’s gonna be OK.

Susie Moore is Greatist’s life coach columnist and a confidence coach in New York City. Sign up for free weekly wellness tips on her website and check back every Tuesday for her latest No Regrets column!

My Mission to Change a Million Lives Through Uncertainty Training

Source http://zenhabits.net/million/

By Leo Babauta

My friends, I am on a mission.

I am going to change a million lives through my uncertainty training, helping people shift how they deal with fear and the chaos of their lives.

Every day, we deal with doubts, with feeling overwhelmed, with frustration and anger, with loneliness and disconnection, with stress and anxiety, with discomfort and change. And in times of trouble, we deal with the uncertainty of death, massive change, illness, loss of jobs, collapsing finances and growing debt, incredible fears, shifting economy and turbulent politics.

It’s enough to make us want to give up, or run to our comforts.

But this seeking of comforts and exits, hiding from fears, lashing out at others in frustration … it only makes things worse. It’s throwing gasoline on the fire, and hoping it helps the situation.

So I’m on a mission. I want to help people shift how they deal with this massive and daily uncertainty, so that they can do meaningful work in the world.

Doing meaningful work means that we’re going to face tons of uncertainty — self-doubt, fears of failure, not knowing what we’re doing, being overwhelmed by too much to do, wanting to procrastinate and run to distractions, dealing with a constantly shifting landscape and frustrating coworkers.

But instead of running from these things, we can train ourselves to embrace the uncertainty, so that we can do the purposeful work we want to do to change the world.

Imagine doing your meaningful work while embracing the uncertainty, opening up to it with relaxation, gratitude, even joy.

That would change everything. All of a sudden, your meaningful work wouldn’t shut you down, but would be something you’d jump into. The uncertainty wouldn’t crush you with fear and stress, but would be something you’d work with mindfully, that you’d *use* to help you serve the people you care about.

You’d be able to be completely and wholeheartedly devoted to the people you serve. You’d lean into the uncertainty *for these people you care deeply about*, out of love for them.

That’s my mission. If I can help one person train this way, I’m happy. But I’m already helping nearly 200 people train this way, in my Fearless Training Program. That is incredibly gratifying.

And it’s just the start. I’m going to change a million lives through this training, and it will be done in a number of ways, including:

1. My online training program, Fearless Training.
2. A book and video courses on this topic.
3. An app to help people train every day.
4. A small group program (limited to 20 people) where we go deep into training in uncertainty, conscious leadership, and deep purpose.
5. A podcast.
6. Live events like workshops and retreats.

That’s a lot of work, so I’m committed to building a small team (and eventually a bigger team) to make this happen. That’s going to start with hiring a Director of Operations to build and run this team, and I’ll announce that job opening soon.

I’m committed to making this happen, with all of my heart. I will walk through walls to accomplish this mission. I would love for you to join me.

I invite you to train with me and nearly 200 others and get started today in my Fearless Training Program.

Tracking Wonder Workshop This Month

I will be helping to conduct a workshop in a couple weeks, with my friend Jeffrey Davis of Tracking Wonder.

There are some spots left in this fantastic workshop, which I think you’ll love. It’s set in a gorgeous campus, the 1440 Multiversity.

Read more and register today!

Source http://zenhabits.net/million/

By Leo Babauta

My friends, I am on a mission.

I am going to change a million lives through my uncertainty training, helping people shift how they deal with fear and the chaos of their lives.

Every day, we deal with doubts, with feeling overwhelmed, with frustration and anger, with loneliness and disconnection, with stress and anxiety, with discomfort and change. And in times of trouble, we deal with the uncertainty of death, massive change, illness, loss of jobs, collapsing finances and growing debt, incredible fears, shifting economy and turbulent politics.

It’s enough to make us want to give up, or run to our comforts.

But this seeking of comforts and exits, hiding from fears, lashing out at others in frustration … it only makes things worse. It’s throwing gasoline on the fire, and hoping it helps the situation.

So I’m on a mission. I want to help people shift how they deal with this massive and daily uncertainty, so that they can do meaningful work in the world.

Doing meaningful work means that we’re going to face tons of uncertainty — self-doubt, fears of failure, not knowing what we’re doing, being overwhelmed by too much to do, wanting to procrastinate and run to distractions, dealing with a constantly shifting landscape and frustrating coworkers.

But instead of running from these things, we can train ourselves to embrace the uncertainty, so that we can do the purposeful work we want to do to change the world.

Imagine doing your meaningful work while embracing the uncertainty, opening up to it with relaxation, gratitude, even joy.

That would change everything. All of a sudden, your meaningful work wouldn’t shut you down, but would be something you’d jump into. The uncertainty wouldn’t crush you with fear and stress, but would be something you’d work with mindfully, that you’d *use* to help you serve the people you care about.

You’d be able to be completely and wholeheartedly devoted to the people you serve. You’d lean into the uncertainty *for these people you care deeply about*, out of love for them.

That’s my mission. If I can help one person train this way, I’m happy. But I’m already helping nearly 200 people train this way, in my Fearless Training Program. That is incredibly gratifying.

And it’s just the start. I’m going to change a million lives through this training, and it will be done in a number of ways, including:

1. My online training program, Fearless Training.
2. A book and video courses on this topic.
3. An app to help people train every day.
4. A small group program (limited to 20 people) where we go deep into training in uncertainty, conscious leadership, and deep purpose.
5. A podcast.
6. Live events like workshops and retreats.

That’s a lot of work, so I’m committed to building a small team (and eventually a bigger team) to make this happen. That’s going to start with hiring a Director of Operations to build and run this team, and I’ll announce that job opening soon.

I’m committed to making this happen, with all of my heart. I will walk through walls to accomplish this mission. I would love for you to join me.

I invite you to train with me and nearly 200 others and get started today in my Fearless Training Program.

Tracking Wonder Workshop This Month

I will be helping to conduct a workshop in a couple weeks, with my friend Jeffrey Davis of Tracking Wonder.

There are some spots left in this fantastic workshop, which I think you’ll love. It’s set in a gorgeous campus, the 1440 Multiversity.

Read more and register today!

The Beautiful and Scary Practice of Moving Closer

Source http://zenhabits.net/closer/

By Leo Babauta

Life is full of all kinds of stresses, and each of us has habitual ways of reacting to those stresses — we procrastinate, run to comforts, lash out or distance ourselves from others, try to exit from a stressful place, mentally complain about others.

The sad effect of these habitual reactions is that they move us further away from others, and from the direct experience of the moment.

Let’s take a quick example: If you are hurt by the way someone is acting, your habitual reaction might be complaining about them, taking offense, getting angry (all of these or a combo). Then you shut them out, closing your heart to them, moving away from them.

The effect of this is that you’ve now distanced yourself from the other person. And I submit that this is the cause of most of our relationship problems, work issues, violence, racism, political strife, and wars.

Closing our hearts to others and creating distance from them out of habitual reaction to stress is the heart of aggression, violence and pain.

We do the same thing when it comes to our direct experience of the moment — if we’re bored, unhappy with our situation, unhappy with ourselves, stressed or tired … we habitually try to find comfort in food, drink, drugs, online distractions, TV or videos, shopping, porn, drowning everything out with music, and so on. We are moving away from the present moment, shutting out the world around us.

Moving ourselves away from the direct experience of this moment, out of habitual reaction, is the heart of our unhappiness and disconnect from life.

These are all based on the same problem — we have habitual reactions to stress, and those habitual reactions move us further from other people. From life itself. From ourselves.

Today, I’d like to offer you a practice that I’ve been exploring myself: the beautiful practice of moving closer.

It is scary, shaky, and transformative.

It goes like this:

  1. Notice that you’re feeling some kind of stress — anxiety, pain, struggle, frustration, overwhelm, sadness.
  2. Notice your habitual reaction to that stress: you procrastinate, try to exit, shut someone out, complain, run to one of your comforts, hide, quit, run away, lash out, yell, hit, medicate, etc.
  3. Refrain from indulging in your habitual reaction. Instead, just remain still. Instead of complaining, do nothing. Instead of spinning around a narrative about the other person and shutting them out, do nothing. Just refrain.
  4. Breathe deeply into the sensations in your body. When you refrain from your habitual reaction, you are left with an energy in your body that still really wants to do the habitual thing. It will be a strong urge. You just sit still. You do nothing. But you breathe deeply and relax around the energy in your body. Notice how it feels, in your torso. Be curious about it. Stay with it. Be present with it. Welcome it. Give it compassion.
  5. Now, move closer. Someone else stressing you out? After refraining from complaining about them, move closer to them. Open your heart and be fully present with them. Be completely loving. Yes, sometimes you have to physically protect yourself — but that doesn’t mean you have to shut down your heart. You can love the person who has hurt you, without letting them continue to hurt you. Maybe it’s not a person but a situation (or yourself) that’s stressing you out. You are filled with discomfort and uncertainty. You refrain from your habitual reaction, and instead you move closer to the direct experience of this moment. You open your heart to the world, and love it as it is. You love yourself as you are.

Continue to move closer. Continue to reopen your heart. From this place, see what action you need to take. Not from the place of habitual reaction.

It’s an incredibly beautiful practice. And yes, it’s filled with shakiness. That makes it even more courageous.

Source http://zenhabits.net/closer/

By Leo Babauta

Life is full of all kinds of stresses, and each of us has habitual ways of reacting to those stresses — we procrastinate, run to comforts, lash out or distance ourselves from others, try to exit from a stressful place, mentally complain about others.

The sad effect of these habitual reactions is that they move us further away from others, and from the direct experience of the moment.

Let’s take a quick example: If you are hurt by the way someone is acting, your habitual reaction might be complaining about them, taking offense, getting angry (all of these or a combo). Then you shut them out, closing your heart to them, moving away from them.

The effect of this is that you’ve now distanced yourself from the other person. And I submit that this is the cause of most of our relationship problems, work issues, violence, racism, political strife, and wars.

Closing our hearts to others and creating distance from them out of habitual reaction to stress is the heart of aggression, violence and pain.

We do the same thing when it comes to our direct experience of the moment — if we’re bored, unhappy with our situation, unhappy with ourselves, stressed or tired … we habitually try to find comfort in food, drink, drugs, online distractions, TV or videos, shopping, porn, drowning everything out with music, and so on. We are moving away from the present moment, shutting out the world around us.

Moving ourselves away from the direct experience of this moment, out of habitual reaction, is the heart of our unhappiness and disconnect from life.

These are all based on the same problem — we have habitual reactions to stress, and those habitual reactions move us further from other people. From life itself. From ourselves.

Today, I’d like to offer you a practice that I’ve been exploring myself: the beautiful practice of moving closer.

It is scary, shaky, and transformative.

It goes like this:

  1. Notice that you’re feeling some kind of stress — anxiety, pain, struggle, frustration, overwhelm, sadness.
  2. Notice your habitual reaction to that stress: you procrastinate, try to exit, shut someone out, complain, run to one of your comforts, hide, quit, run away, lash out, yell, hit, medicate, etc.
  3. Refrain from indulging in your habitual reaction. Instead, just remain still. Instead of complaining, do nothing. Instead of spinning around a narrative about the other person and shutting them out, do nothing. Just refrain.
  4. Breathe deeply into the sensations in your body. When you refrain from your habitual reaction, you are left with an energy in your body that still really wants to do the habitual thing. It will be a strong urge. You just sit still. You do nothing. But you breathe deeply and relax around the energy in your body. Notice how it feels, in your torso. Be curious about it. Stay with it. Be present with it. Welcome it. Give it compassion.
  5. Now, move closer. Someone else stressing you out? After refraining from complaining about them, move closer to them. Open your heart and be fully present with them. Be completely loving. Yes, sometimes you have to physically protect yourself — but that doesn’t mean you have to shut down your heart. You can love the person who has hurt you, without letting them continue to hurt you. Maybe it’s not a person but a situation (or yourself) that’s stressing you out. You are filled with discomfort and uncertainty. You refrain from your habitual reaction, and instead you move closer to the direct experience of this moment. You open your heart to the world, and love it as it is. You love yourself as you are.

Continue to move closer. Continue to reopen your heart. From this place, see what action you need to take. Not from the place of habitual reaction.

It’s an incredibly beautiful practice. And yes, it’s filled with shakiness. That makes it even more courageous.

Caregivers and the Personal Sacrifices They Make for Loved Ones

Source https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/caregivers-and-the-personal-sacrifices-they-make/

Nearly 40% of Americans have experience providing long-term care to a family member, friend or senior loved one. Recently, a study designed to give greater insight into the burdens of caregiving found that many of these caregivers are making great financial, medical and social sacrifices to provide care.Caregivers and the Personal Sacrifices They Make for Loved Ones

Learn more about the study, the burden placed on caregivers and the personal sacrifices they make for their loved ones.

Survey Reveals the Personal Sacrifices of Family Caregivers

A recent survey conducted by the Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that unpaid caregivers make great financial, medical and social sacrifices.

The study polled over 1,000 caregivers throughout the United States and found that:

  • 45% of caregivers have outside jobs use some or all of their vacation time for caregiving duties
  • 41% have used personal savings
  • 25% of caregivers have cut back on their retirement savings
  • 25% spend 40 hours caregiving each week

Additionally, nearly 33% of caregivers also said they have neglected their own personal care,  including dental exams, routine physical exams and skipped medical tests or treatments. The respondents also admitted to not seeing a doctor when they were sick.

Personal care is not the only thing caregivers are sacrificing, however. In addition to prioritizing the care of others, nearly 80% of caregivers pay for the expenses associated with that care.

The majority of survey respondents made less than $50,000 per year and more than 10% spend over $500 per month on caregiving costs, while 20% took on debt to cover caregiving expenses.

The Call for Caregiver Support

Associate Director and Vice President of the Health Care Department at NORC at the University of Chicago, Michelle Strollo, says, “I think people don’t always appreciate how taxing…  the job of caregiver can be for individuals. Caregivers sacrifice their many social relationships, including relationships with their spouses, other family members and friends, that comes at a cost to them emotionally.”

Researchers hope that the survey will inform communities and policymakers, acting as a needs assessment for how communities can better support caregivers.

Seeing the burden of unpaid caregivers financially, medically and socially will hopefully bring more care opportunities, financial and legal aid, support groups and transportation solutions for caregivers.

Professor of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, Donna Benton, states, “Caregivers are the backbone of our long-term care system. If we didn’t have family caregivers with unpaid help, our health care system would pretty much collapse.”

She adds, “The results indicate that these caregivers are very invested in providing care to their loved ones, but they have a lot of needs themselves. So, I think the research begs the question — who is providing support for the caregivers?”

What personal sacrifices have you made while providing care to a parent or senior loved one? We’d like to hear your stories in the comments below.

Related Articles:

Source https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/caregivers-and-the-personal-sacrifices-they-make/

Nearly 40% of Americans have experience providing long-term care to a family member, friend or senior loved one. Recently, a study designed to give greater insight into the burdens of caregiving found that many of these caregivers are making great financial, medical and social sacrifices to provide care.Caregivers and the Personal Sacrifices They Make for Loved Ones

Learn more about the study, the burden placed on caregivers and the personal sacrifices they make for their loved ones.

Survey Reveals the Personal Sacrifices of Family Caregivers

A recent survey conducted by the Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that unpaid caregivers make great financial, medical and social sacrifices.

The study polled over 1,000 caregivers throughout the United States and found that:

  • 45% of caregivers have outside jobs use some or all of their vacation time for caregiving duties
  • 41% have used personal savings
  • 25% of caregivers have cut back on their retirement savings
  • 25% spend 40 hours caregiving each week

Additionally, nearly 33% of caregivers also said they have neglected their own personal care,  including dental exams, routine physical exams and skipped medical tests or treatments. The respondents also admitted to not seeing a doctor when they were sick.

Personal care is not the only thing caregivers are sacrificing, however. In addition to prioritizing the care of others, nearly 80% of caregivers pay for the expenses associated with that care.

The majority of survey respondents made less than $50,000 per year and more than 10% spend over $500 per month on caregiving costs, while 20% took on debt to cover caregiving expenses.

The Call for Caregiver Support

Associate Director and Vice President of the Health Care Department at NORC at the University of Chicago, Michelle Strollo, says, “I think people don’t always appreciate how taxing…  the job of caregiver can be for individuals. Caregivers sacrifice their many social relationships, including relationships with their spouses, other family members and friends, that comes at a cost to them emotionally.”

Researchers hope that the survey will inform communities and policymakers, acting as a needs assessment for how communities can better support caregivers.

Seeing the burden of unpaid caregivers financially, medically and socially will hopefully bring more care opportunities, financial and legal aid, support groups and transportation solutions for caregivers.

Professor of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, Donna Benton, states, “Caregivers are the backbone of our long-term care system. If we didn’t have family caregivers with unpaid help, our health care system would pretty much collapse.”

She adds, “The results indicate that these caregivers are very invested in providing care to their loved ones, but they have a lot of needs themselves. So, I think the research begs the question — who is providing support for the caregivers?”

What personal sacrifices have you made while providing care to a parent or senior loved one? We’d like to hear your stories in the comments below.

Related Articles:

7 Books Worth Your Time for a Healthy, Happy, and Productive 2019

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NoMeatAthlete/~3/iOJ-2s5Et8Q/

piles of books on table over blurred library background.

We’re two weeks into the new year… which means when it comes to resolutions, most people have hit the wall.

And that’s okay.

When we make New Year’s about a “clean slate,” our one chance to get things right, we’re going to lose. Of course we are.

But there’s tremendous opportunity in using this time of year — post-holidays, post-stress, post-busyness — to create new habits that will make this year better than the last.

So the good news is that even if your resolutions are history, the season isn’t. We’re only two weeks in!

In this spirit, I offer you the list of books I’m most excited about for their capacity to help all of us make change for the better.

Several of them I’ve read many times (often at New Year’s, in fact), a few I’ve read just once (that’s all that was needed), and a couple others that I’m reading now or have on my list for early this year.

I hope they help you make the most of this wonderful season.

41m7L8FrIzL._SX310_BO1,204,203,200_1. Turning Pro by Steven Pressfield

Maybe the best book for reading at the start of a new year, ever. I’ve read it four or five times, and I know NMA Radio co-host Doug is a big fan, too.

Turning Pro is about growing up. Showing up. And forever giving up the excuses and rationalizations that keep you an amateur (both professionally and otherwise).

It’s written for writers and artists, but the advice is applicable to just about everyone, in whatever area of life you’re playing too small.

2. Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

A few weeks ago, I listened to David Goggins on the Rich Roll Podcast.

I knew he was a ultrarunner, an ultra-distance cyclist, and a triathlete. And I knew he was an ex-Navy SEAL, one of those military dudes you just don’t want to mess with.

Usually, I don’t really relate to people like this; it’s just too big a leap. Robotic discipline and run-through-walls determination? Cool, but not really me.

But when you learn about where Goggins comes from and how he grew up, you realize he wasn’t born superhuman. He decided to be this way, and he still decides to choose discomfort and growth over what’s easy — every single day, starting at a ridiculously dark and cold hour.

I haven’t read Can’t Hurt Me, his self-published memoir, yet. I’m still riding the motivation-high of the new year and feeling plenty inspired.

But the second that starts to dip — and I know that at some point, it will — this will be my motivation to get back in the game.

41nAX7WbShL._SY346_3. The Little Book of Talent by Daniel Coyle

One of the most inspiring lessons I’ve ever learned is that talent isn’t an accident.

That most people who are truly great in their fields are that way not because they were born with it, but because they worked hard.

The so-called 10,000 Hour Rule was eye-opening for me. Our culture wants to be believe that the outstanding performers we admire were born with the gift — because that lets us off the hook: We weren’t born with anything special, so it’s not our fault.

But when you come to believe that with hard work and lots of it — real, deliberate practice, for thousands of hours — mastery of anything is possible, suddenly you have a lot of choices. (This is especially exciting for kids, who have more time with which to accumulate those thousands of hours.)

Daniel Coyle wrote a long book, called the Talent Code, about this idea, where he shared the best practices he learned by studying talent hotbeds around the world. The Little Book of Talent is a distillation of that advice into 52 short directives — things like “shrink the practice space” and “buy a notebook” — to help you engineer your (or your kids’) practice routines for success.

613D-sCSsoL._SY346_4. The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carroll

I’ve been frustrated with journaling for a long time. I’d love to make it work — to have a record of my successes, failures, and lessons learned, plus whatever benefits come from the journaling process itself — but just haven’t been able to make the habit last.

I go through spurts where I do it every day, and then I stop for months (or years). I’ve tried it in different formats, handwritten and typed, notebook, computer, cloud, with no way to pull it all together. It’s a mess.

Worse, I keep notebooks of to-do lists and day-to-day notes, but I have no process for revisiting them. Sure, I might write down a great insight or quote, but I’ll likely never see it again without any system for making sure I do.

Well, the Bullet Journal promises to be that system, and hundreds of thousands of happy Bullet-journalers give me reason to believe that promise.

Charmingly, it’s all done in a blank, pen-and-paper notebook. You can now buy “official” Bullet Journals, but I find that idea much less appealing than the DIY version.

You actually don’t need to buy The Bullet Journal Method to learn the system; it’s all laid out for free on the author’s website. But the book provides additional context around things like goals and intentionality, and the idea that at its best, Bullet Journaling is an exercise in mindfulness.

5. The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Yes, this is kind of old. I read it back in 2015, and I felt like I was late to party then.

So why include it? Because it freaking works.

I read a whole lot of books about how to make things better, and for me, none has ever delivered on its promise the way this one has.

Since my epic tidying marathon this book inspired three years ago, I’ve never gone back to my old ways. It’s life-changing, for real.

Now’s the perfect time. Ditch the clutter and make room for what matters in your life.

51xCkzASckL._SY346_6. Atomic Habits by James Clear

Maybe my mantra should be, “I haven’t read the book, but I have heard the author on the Rich Roll podcast!”

Because that’s the deal with this one, like it was with #2 above.

I talk a lot about the “small steps” approach, and also the opposite (but not entirely incompatible) idea of “massive action.” But there’s so much more to the science of changing habits, a lot of which has to do with engineering your environment for success.

I went into this interview assuming I knew most of what there is to know about practical habit change advice, but as I listened, blogger and author James Clear gave so many “ah-ha” tips that I had to add his book to my list of must-reads this year.

If you think your whole habit-change operating system could use a software upgrade, then this is the book to read.

7. Deep Meditation by Yogani

I’m slightly ashamed to admit that, despite investing quite a bit of money and time in meditation courses and apps, I’ve never made meditation into a lasting habit.

Interestingly, though, none of the fancy courses I’ve bought or attended have provided more insight than Deep Meditation, a short little volume you can buy for $4.61. It shines light on a lot of the dark corners of meditation, and provides a simple, practical prescription for creating a daily practice.

I’m not sure 2019 will be the year I make meditation last — that might never happen. But when I’m ready to try again, this is the approach I’ll go back to.

61-OwbMZwmL._SX404_BO1,204,203,200_8. The No Meat Athlete Cookbook by Matt Frazier and Stepfanie Romine (Just $3.99 today!)

Okay, so I promised you seven books, but snuck in an eighth. And one that I co-authored, no less!

And there’s a good reason for that. The No Meat Athlete Cookbook was selected by Amazon as a Kindle Daily Deal, which means that today (and today, January 13th, only), you can pick up the digital version for just $3.99.

It’s discounted across all platforms today, so you can get it at that price regardless of how you e-read.

This book is our most successful to date, with over 50,000 copies sold and lots of accolades in mainstream press. If you haven’t gotten a copy yet, the start of the new year is as good as time as any.

One final time, happy new year. Remember, it’s not about the day, but about the season, so make something happen while 2019 is still in front of you.

cookbook-facebook-2019

The post 7 Books Worth Your Time for a Healthy, Happy, and Productive 2019 appeared first on No Meat Athlete.

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NoMeatAthlete/~3/iOJ-2s5Et8Q/

piles of books on table over blurred library background.

We’re two weeks into the new year… which means when it comes to resolutions, most people have hit the wall.

And that’s okay.

When we make New Year’s about a “clean slate,” our one chance to get things right, we’re going to lose. Of course we are.

But there’s tremendous opportunity in using this time of year — post-holidays, post-stress, post-busyness — to create new habits that will make this year better than the last.

So the good news is that even if your resolutions are history, the season isn’t. We’re only two weeks in!

In this spirit, I offer you the list of books I’m most excited about for their capacity to help all of us make change for the better.

Several of them I’ve read many times (often at New Year’s, in fact), a few I’ve read just once (that’s all that was needed), and a couple others that I’m reading now or have on my list for early this year.

I hope they help you make the most of this wonderful season.

41m7L8FrIzL._SX310_BO1,204,203,200_1. Turning Pro by Steven Pressfield

Maybe the best book for reading at the start of a new year, ever. I’ve read it four or five times, and I know NMA Radio co-host Doug is a big fan, too.

Turning Pro is about growing up. Showing up. And forever giving up the excuses and rationalizations that keep you an amateur (both professionally and otherwise).

It’s written for writers and artists, but the advice is applicable to just about everyone, in whatever area of life you’re playing too small.

2. Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins

A few weeks ago, I listened to David Goggins on the Rich Roll Podcast.

I knew he was a ultrarunner, an ultra-distance cyclist, and a triathlete. And I knew he was an ex-Navy SEAL, one of those military dudes you just don’t want to mess with.

Usually, I don’t really relate to people like this; it’s just too big a leap. Robotic discipline and run-through-walls determination? Cool, but not really me.

But when you learn about where Goggins comes from and how he grew up, you realize he wasn’t born superhuman. He decided to be this way, and he still decides to choose discomfort and growth over what’s easy — every single day, starting at a ridiculously dark and cold hour.

I haven’t read Can’t Hurt Me, his self-published memoir, yet. I’m still riding the motivation-high of the new year and feeling plenty inspired.

But the second that starts to dip — and I know that at some point, it will — this will be my motivation to get back in the game.

41nAX7WbShL._SY346_3. The Little Book of Talent by Daniel Coyle

One of the most inspiring lessons I’ve ever learned is that talent isn’t an accident.

That most people who are truly great in their fields are that way not because they were born with it, but because they worked hard.

The so-called 10,000 Hour Rule was eye-opening for me. Our culture wants to be believe that the outstanding performers we admire were born with the gift — because that lets us off the hook: We weren’t born with anything special, so it’s not our fault.

But when you come to believe that with hard work and lots of it — real, deliberate practice, for thousands of hours — mastery of anything is possible, suddenly you have a lot of choices. (This is especially exciting for kids, who have more time with which to accumulate those thousands of hours.)

Daniel Coyle wrote a long book, called the Talent Code, about this idea, where he shared the best practices he learned by studying talent hotbeds around the world. The Little Book of Talent is a distillation of that advice into 52 short directives — things like “shrink the practice space” and “buy a notebook” — to help you engineer your (or your kids’) practice routines for success.

613D-sCSsoL._SY346_4. The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carroll

I’ve been frustrated with journaling for a long time. I’d love to make it work — to have a record of my successes, failures, and lessons learned, plus whatever benefits come from the journaling process itself — but just haven’t been able to make the habit last.

I go through spurts where I do it every day, and then I stop for months (or years). I’ve tried it in different formats, handwritten and typed, notebook, computer, cloud, with no way to pull it all together. It’s a mess.

Worse, I keep notebooks of to-do lists and day-to-day notes, but I have no process for revisiting them. Sure, I might write down a great insight or quote, but I’ll likely never see it again without any system for making sure I do.

Well, the Bullet Journal promises to be that system, and hundreds of thousands of happy Bullet-journalers give me reason to believe that promise.

Charmingly, it’s all done in a blank, pen-and-paper notebook. You can now buy “official” Bullet Journals, but I find that idea much less appealing than the DIY version.

You actually don’t need to buy The Bullet Journal Method to learn the system; it’s all laid out for free on the author’s website. But the book provides additional context around things like goals and intentionality, and the idea that at its best, Bullet Journaling is an exercise in mindfulness.

5. The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Yes, this is kind of old. I read it back in 2015, and I felt like I was late to party then.

So why include it? Because it freaking works.

I read a whole lot of books about how to make things better, and for me, none has ever delivered on its promise the way this one has.

Since my epic tidying marathon this book inspired three years ago, I’ve never gone back to my old ways. It’s life-changing, for real.

Now’s the perfect time. Ditch the clutter and make room for what matters in your life.

51xCkzASckL._SY346_6. Atomic Habits by James Clear

Maybe my mantra should be, “I haven’t read the book, but I have heard the author on the Rich Roll podcast!”

Because that’s the deal with this one, like it was with #2 above.

I talk a lot about the “small steps” approach, and also the opposite (but not entirely incompatible) idea of “massive action.” But there’s so much more to the science of changing habits, a lot of which has to do with engineering your environment for success.

I went into this interview assuming I knew most of what there is to know about practical habit change advice, but as I listened, blogger and author James Clear gave so many “ah-ha” tips that I had to add his book to my list of must-reads this year.

If you think your whole habit-change operating system could use a software upgrade, then this is the book to read.

7. Deep Meditation by Yogani

I’m slightly ashamed to admit that, despite investing quite a bit of money and time in meditation courses and apps, I’ve never made meditation into a lasting habit.

Interestingly, though, none of the fancy courses I’ve bought or attended have provided more insight than Deep Meditation, a short little volume you can buy for $4.61. It shines light on a lot of the dark corners of meditation, and provides a simple, practical prescription for creating a daily practice.

I’m not sure 2019 will be the year I make meditation last — that might never happen. But when I’m ready to try again, this is the approach I’ll go back to.

61-OwbMZwmL._SX404_BO1,204,203,200_8. The No Meat Athlete Cookbook by Matt Frazier and Stepfanie Romine (Just $3.99 today!)

Okay, so I promised you seven books, but snuck in an eighth. And one that I co-authored, no less!

And there’s a good reason for that. The No Meat Athlete Cookbook was selected by Amazon as a Kindle Daily Deal, which means that today (and today, January 13th, only), you can pick up the digital version for just $3.99.

It’s discounted across all platforms today, so you can get it at that price regardless of how you e-read.

This book is our most successful to date, with over 50,000 copies sold and lots of accolades in mainstream press. If you haven’t gotten a copy yet, the start of the new year is as good as time as any.

One final time, happy new year. Remember, it’s not about the day, but about the season, so make something happen while 2019 is still in front of you.

cookbook-facebook-2019

The post 7 Books Worth Your Time for a Healthy, Happy, and Productive 2019 appeared first on No Meat Athlete.

For Older Women, Taking High Blood Pressure Medication May Not Raise Risk for Falls

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/for-older-women-taking-high-blood-pressure-medication-may-not-raise-risk-for-falls/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) is the medical term for when the force of blood against your blood vessel walls is too high. We know that using medication to lower high blood pressure can prevent heart attacks and strokes. But healthcare professionals often worry that prescriptions for lowering high blood pressure can sometimes lower it too much. This can put you at risk for becoming dizzy and falling.

Falls are a serious problem in older adults. In 2014, falls caused 2.8 million emergency room visits, 800,000 hospitalizations, and 27,000 deaths, and cost Medicare an estimated $31.3 billion.

Although some healthcare experts suspect that taking high blood pressure medication over time is linked to falls and fractures, very little research supports that belief. In fact, at least two major studies examining blood pressure reduction did not find an increased risk for falls among people taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. Other studies have not shown an increase in fracture risk for people taking medication for high blood pressure—in fact, some studies suggest that high blood pressure medicines may actually reduce the risk for fractures.

Researchers decided to learn more about the links between falls, high blood pressure, and high blood pressure medication in older women. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The research team used information from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health (OPACH) study. This study was designed to examine the risk of falls for older women (aged 50 to 79) based on their high blood pressure status.  (High blood pressure is often defined as having a reading of 140 mmHg for your “systolic” blood pressure and 90 mmHg or higher for your “diastolic” blood pressure).

Among women with high blood pressure, the researchers looked at participants who did or did not take medication to control their condition. They also took note of the participants’ blood pressure readings over the course of the study.

5,971 women in the study received home visits. Most of the women were in their late 70s. During the visits, the participants had their blood pressure tested. They also were tested to measure their balance, walking speed, and their ability to stand from a seated position. The women also kept calendars for 13 months showing whether or not they had experienced a fall, or if they had come close to falling.

The researchers concluded there was no increased risk of falls among women who took high blood pressure medication compared to those whose blood pressure readings were normal.

In fact, women whose blood pressure was normal with medication had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of falls compared to women who didn’t have high blood pressure.

The researchers also concluded that taking medication to reduce high blood pressure was not linked to falls in older women. However, other researchers looking at studies with large numbers of participants have found that the risk of falls increased in the first several weeks after people began taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. The increased risk disappeared after the first several weeks.

The researchers suggested that healthcare practitioners measure blood pressure carefully in the office, and potentially have blood pressure measurements taken at home to confirm whether older women need to take medication to lower high blood pressure.

While the risk of a serious fall injury is low for women taking medication for high blood pressure, the researchers suggested that it makes sense to monitor patients for the first few weeks after starting a new medication to reduce high blood pressure—or after raising the dosage for a medication they’re already taking. The researchers said that for women who are doing well and tolerating a new prescription after the first several weeks, it seems likely that they can enjoy the long-term health benefits of better blood pressure control without an increased risk for falls.

 This summary is from “Hypertension Treatment & Falls in Older Women.” It appears online ahead of print in the December 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Karen L. Margolis, MD, MPH; David M. Buchner, MD, MPH; Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH; Yuzheng Zhang, MS; Chongzhi Di, PhD; Eileen Rillamas-Sun, PhD, MPH; Julie Hunt, PhD; Farha Ikramuddin; Wenjun Li; Steve Marshall, PhD; Dori Rosenberg, PhD, MPH; Marcia L. Stefanick, PhD; Robert Wallace; and Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD.

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/for-older-women-taking-high-blood-pressure-medication-may-not-raise-risk-for-falls/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) is the medical term for when the force of blood against your blood vessel walls is too high. We know that using medication to lower high blood pressure can prevent heart attacks and strokes. But healthcare professionals often worry that prescriptions for lowering high blood pressure can sometimes lower it too much. This can put you at risk for becoming dizzy and falling.

Falls are a serious problem in older adults. In 2014, falls caused 2.8 million emergency room visits, 800,000 hospitalizations, and 27,000 deaths, and cost Medicare an estimated $31.3 billion.

Although some healthcare experts suspect that taking high blood pressure medication over time is linked to falls and fractures, very little research supports that belief. In fact, at least two major studies examining blood pressure reduction did not find an increased risk for falls among people taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. Other studies have not shown an increase in fracture risk for people taking medication for high blood pressure—in fact, some studies suggest that high blood pressure medicines may actually reduce the risk for fractures.

Researchers decided to learn more about the links between falls, high blood pressure, and high blood pressure medication in older women. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The research team used information from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health (OPACH) study. This study was designed to examine the risk of falls for older women (aged 50 to 79) based on their high blood pressure status.  (High blood pressure is often defined as having a reading of 140 mmHg for your “systolic” blood pressure and 90 mmHg or higher for your “diastolic” blood pressure).

Among women with high blood pressure, the researchers looked at participants who did or did not take medication to control their condition. They also took note of the participants’ blood pressure readings over the course of the study.

5,971 women in the study received home visits. Most of the women were in their late 70s. During the visits, the participants had their blood pressure tested. They also were tested to measure their balance, walking speed, and their ability to stand from a seated position. The women also kept calendars for 13 months showing whether or not they had experienced a fall, or if they had come close to falling.

The researchers concluded there was no increased risk of falls among women who took high blood pressure medication compared to those whose blood pressure readings were normal.

In fact, women whose blood pressure was normal with medication had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of falls compared to women who didn’t have high blood pressure.

The researchers also concluded that taking medication to reduce high blood pressure was not linked to falls in older women. However, other researchers looking at studies with large numbers of participants have found that the risk of falls increased in the first several weeks after people began taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. The increased risk disappeared after the first several weeks.

The researchers suggested that healthcare practitioners measure blood pressure carefully in the office, and potentially have blood pressure measurements taken at home to confirm whether older women need to take medication to lower high blood pressure.

While the risk of a serious fall injury is low for women taking medication for high blood pressure, the researchers suggested that it makes sense to monitor patients for the first few weeks after starting a new medication to reduce high blood pressure—or after raising the dosage for a medication they’re already taking. The researchers said that for women who are doing well and tolerating a new prescription after the first several weeks, it seems likely that they can enjoy the long-term health benefits of better blood pressure control without an increased risk for falls.

 This summary is from “Hypertension Treatment & Falls in Older Women.” It appears online ahead of print in the December 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Karen L. Margolis, MD, MPH; David M. Buchner, MD, MPH; Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH; Yuzheng Zhang, MS; Chongzhi Di, PhD; Eileen Rillamas-Sun, PhD, MPH; Julie Hunt, PhD; Farha Ikramuddin; Wenjun Li; Steve Marshall, PhD; Dori Rosenberg, PhD, MPH; Marcia L. Stefanick, PhD; Robert Wallace; and Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD.

BrainScope wins FDA clearance for concussion-detecting technology

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/brainscope-wins-fda-clearance-for-concussion-detecting-technology/

BrainScope makes a portable medical device that can quickly assess a range of TBI. The company’s tech recently received clearance from the FDA for use as a “multi-modal, multi-parameter assessment,” to determine the likelihood that someone has suffered a “concussion” or “mild traumatic brain injury,” and evaluate how severe the injury may be. BrainScope One uses

Read More…

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/brainscope-wins-fda-clearance-for-concussion-detecting-technology/

BrainScope makes a portable medical device that can quickly assess a range of TBI. The company’s tech recently received clearance from the FDA for use as a “multi-modal, multi-parameter assessment,” to determine the likelihood that someone has suffered a “concussion” or “mild traumatic brain injury,” and evaluate how severe the injury may be. BrainScope One uses

Read More…

Coca-Cola’s political influence in China: documented evidence

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/01/coca-colas-political-influence-in-china-documented-evidence/

The BMJ (the new name for what was formerly the British Medical Journal) has just published a report by Susan Greenhalgh, an anthropologist at Harvard, of how Coca-Cola, working through the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), got the Chinese government to focus its anti-obesity efforts on promoting physical activity rather than dietary changes.

Professor Greenhalgh documented industry influence on Chinese health policy through review of published work as well as interviews with key players in this drama.

A more thorough report of her investigation with details of her interviews was released at the same time by the Journal of Public Health Policy: “Soda industry influence on obesity science and policy in China.”  This report comes with extensive supplemental information about her methods and interview details.

For readers familiar with Coca-Cola’s funding of the Global Energy Balance Network (GEBN), this is a familiar story.

I tell the GEBN story in a chapter in my recently released book, Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat.

One surprise in writing that book was how often ILSI turns up in its pages.  ILSI positions itself as an independent “nonprofit, worldwide organization whose mission is to provide science that improves human health and well-being and safeguards the environment,” but it was founded by Coca-Cola and is largely supported by food and beverage companies.  It works in many countries to promote food-industry interests.

Greenhalgh’s articles thoroughly expose how this organization accomplishes its objectives.  If you would like to know more about it, UCSF Food Industry Documents Library can help, as I learned about from this tweet.

Greenhalgh’s investigation has received extensive press coverage.

I was particularly interested in the account by Crossfit’s Derek Fields and Russ Greene, which provides further documentation of the close connections between Chinese health agencies, ILSI, and programs funded by Coca-Cola.

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2019/01/coca-colas-political-influence-in-china-documented-evidence/

The BMJ (the new name for what was formerly the British Medical Journal) has just published a report by Susan Greenhalgh, an anthropologist at Harvard, of how Coca-Cola, working through the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), got the Chinese government to focus its anti-obesity efforts on promoting physical activity rather than dietary changes.

Professor Greenhalgh documented industry influence on Chinese health policy through review of published work as well as interviews with key players in this drama.

A more thorough report of her investigation with details of her interviews was released at the same time by the Journal of Public Health Policy: “Soda industry influence on obesity science and policy in China.”  This report comes with extensive supplemental information about her methods and interview details.

For readers familiar with Coca-Cola’s funding of the Global Energy Balance Network (GEBN), this is a familiar story.

I tell the GEBN story in a chapter in my recently released book, Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat.

One surprise in writing that book was how often ILSI turns up in its pages.  ILSI positions itself as an independent “nonprofit, worldwide organization whose mission is to provide science that improves human health and well-being and safeguards the environment,” but it was founded by Coca-Cola and is largely supported by food and beverage companies.  It works in many countries to promote food-industry interests.

Greenhalgh’s articles thoroughly expose how this organization accomplishes its objectives.  If you would like to know more about it, UCSF Food Industry Documents Library can help, as I learned about from this tweet.

Greenhalgh’s investigation has received extensive press coverage.

I was particularly interested in the account by Crossfit’s Derek Fields and Russ Greene, which provides further documentation of the close connections between Chinese health agencies, ILSI, and programs funded by Coca-Cola.

Infographic: Reducing Your Alzheimer's Risk

Source: https://www.webmd.com/special-reports/confronting-alzheimers/20160225/alzheimers-infographic?src=RSS_PUBLIC

woman with alzheimers

WebMD’s infographic details ways you can keep your brain sharp and reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/special-reports/confronting-alzheimers/20160225/alzheimers-infographic?src=RSS_PUBLIC

woman with alzheimers

WebMD’s infographic details ways you can keep your brain sharp and reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s disease.