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How to Use A Foam Roller: Step-by-Step Guide

Source https://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/how-to-use-a-foam-roller-step-by-step-guide/

In the last few years, the foam roller has become a staple in commercial gyms. 10% of every piece of equipment in a modern fitness facility is now some type of foam roller.

Not true, but they are indeed everywhere.

And with good reason: you can essentially give yourself a deep tissue massage with one of these bad boys. And if you fork out $20 bucks, you don’t even have to leave your home to do it!

So today we’ll chat about these new toys:

  • The benefits of using a foam roller
  • Some simple exercises you can do from home
  • Common pitfalls we want to make sure you avoid
  • What to buy should you want one
  • Whether or not you should put a cat in one

That last one is definitely a hard “no.”

Let’s get rolling (the puns are only going to get worse from here)

What are the benefits of using a foam roller?

You’ll often hear using a foam roller as “self-myofascial release.”

You may be asking, “myofawhatnow?”

Don’t stress, because “fascia” is just the connective tissue covering muscle. Just know that “self-myofascial release” means giving yourself a tissue massage.

The type of massage you receive has a lot to do with the type of roller you use and the exercises performed. For example, the denser and firmer the roller, the more intense the massage will be. Think the difference between the relaxing touch of a masseur/masseuse and a deep tissue sports massage where you cry out in agony but feel great after.

We’ll start you off with the more relaxing sequence.

Now, it should be noted there is a debate on the actual benefits of “self-myofascial release.” There are some claims that myofascial release will help flexibility and muscle recovery. There are others that say that’s bogus.

What does the science say?

Some of it’s supported:

  • A foam roller has been shown to help the range of hip motion in soccer players[1].
  • Rolling massages can help alleviate muscle soreness[2].

Some of it is not supported:

  • Foam rolling use doesn’t appear to impact the length of muscle[3].
  • A study found no help in relieving “tightness” in the hamstring[4].

So yeah, the science isn’t definitive on this. But there does seem to be a lot of anecdotal evidence praising foam rollers.

My take? I think the foam roller is a great tool for temporary pain relief as long as it’s used correctly, but you can’t ignore what caused the soreness in the first place!

Want help getting started?

Beginner foam roller exercises

All you need is some type of roller and some floor space. A yoga mat would be helpful but not required.

We’ll go over four simple exercises to get you going with a foam roller. Think of the following as a relaxing sequence:

  • Thoracic Spine
  • Glutes (both sides)
  • Quads (one at a time)
  • Abductors

Take each move for about 20-30 seconds. Hold for major sore spots. Breath deeply, calmly.

I asked Matt Myers, one of our online coaches at Nerd Fitness – he’s hilarious but don’t tell him I said that – to guide you through these moves in this quick video.

Yes, that’s a T-Rex on a foam roller. You’re welcome:

That’s it. Keep it simple at first.

You can do this sequence after a workout. Or even before. Or all by itself. Go wild.

Common mistakes when using a foam roller

I want to make an important point on foam rollers:

As mentioned, one of the benefits is their ability to help with painful or tight areas.

However, it’s important to remember that using a foam roller won’t treat the root cause of the pain. It’s only going to help  treat the symptom by easing pain.

As the studies above point out, it’s not quite clear how myofascial release does this.

What I’m trying to say: If you’re working out incorrectly, or in pain because of a sedentary lifestyle, or some other type of issue, using a foam roller won’t fix it. It’ll only help you manage the discomfort. You’ll potentially need outside help to uncover the real issue that’s causing the problem in the first place.

The foam roller is the equivalent of using painkillers to help a broken foot, without first setting any of the bones correctly, or asking the question “Why did you think kicking that brick wall was a good idea in the first place?”

Eek.

So use the foam roller to manage discomfort, but know that it’s not a panacea (boy do I love that word) for all of your ailments and movement issues!

If you’re not sure if you are training correctly, or you’re struggling to not always be dealing with pulled or sore muscles, we are here to help. Matt from our video above, is part of the experienced, fun, non-judgmental staff that make up the Nerd Fitness 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program. Our team can help with many different types of exercises, with or without a roller. Plus, if you’re struggling with weight loss, they can help there too.

Want to see if we are a good fit for each other? Click on the big image below to schedule a free consultation with our Team (you’ll probably speak with Big Red, he’s good people):

Foam roller recommendations

You now know a foam roller can be a super helpful tool to manage pain and discomfort. And thanks to Matt, you even know how to use one.

Want to buy one? You need to think about the following:

  • Density: the denser the roller, the more intense the massage you’ll receive.
  • Texture: some rollers will have ridges and knots to help dig into your muscle and tissue.
  • Shape and size: big ones, small ones, some as big as your head. You can get a foam roller in just about every size you could want.

There’s a lot to consider, but here’s some solid choices:

Boom. That’ll give you some options to… get rolling.

In appreciation of self care

Our lives are busy. It can be a real challenge to carve out time to take care of ourselves. But it’s important that we do. Outside of anyone else, we are in the best position to help ourselves (duh). Even if it’s only for five minutes and with a piece of foam.

Foam rolling is a great way to manage tightness and pain from the comfort of your own home. If you don’t have one, you can also use household items like a tennis ball to attack the “knots” that develop in our bodies. Or, go the other way and spring for a licensed massage[5].

The importance is self care. Try the foam roller the next time you’re at the gym. Or get one sent to your home. It’s a fun toy to have around.

Breathe in now, breathe out, and as Fred Durst of Limp Bizkit taught us: “just keep rollin’ baby.”

What do you think? Love foam rollers? Or think they are a tripping hazard at the gym? Want more advanced exercises? Let us know!

-Steve

PS: I tried my hardest to not make a Limp Bizkit reference in this post. Almost made it.

PPS: If you want help playing with all the other toys at the gym, I’ll mention one last time our 1-on-1 Coaching program. We can help make all the equipment at any fitness facility way less scary. Or teach you how to workout from home so you can skip the whole place altogether.

###

ALL Photos Sources can be found in this footnote here[6].

Footnotes    ( returns to text)

  1. Study on those soccer players here.
  2. The study on foam rolling and muscle soreness is right here
  3. Muscle length study is right here.
  4. Scope out that hamstring investigation at this link.
  5. Treat yo’self!
  6. Photo: foam roller, lego doctor, stormtroopers, noodles, foam roller II, mountain,

Source https://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/how-to-use-a-foam-roller-step-by-step-guide/

In the last few years, the foam roller has become a staple in commercial gyms. 10% of every piece of equipment in a modern fitness facility is now some type of foam roller.

Not true, but they are indeed everywhere.

And with good reason: you can essentially give yourself a deep tissue massage with one of these bad boys. And if you fork out $20 bucks, you don’t even have to leave your home to do it!

So today we’ll chat about these new toys:

  • The benefits of using a foam roller
  • Some simple exercises you can do from home
  • Common pitfalls we want to make sure you avoid
  • What to buy should you want one
  • Whether or not you should put a cat in one

That last one is definitely a hard “no.”

Let’s get rolling (the puns are only going to get worse from here)

What are the benefits of using a foam roller?

You’ll often hear using a foam roller as “self-myofascial release.”

You may be asking, “myofawhatnow?”

Don’t stress, because “fascia” is just the connective tissue covering muscle. Just know that “self-myofascial release” means giving yourself a tissue massage.

The type of massage you receive has a lot to do with the type of roller you use and the exercises performed. For example, the denser and firmer the roller, the more intense the massage will be. Think the difference between the relaxing touch of a masseur/masseuse and a deep tissue sports massage where you cry out in agony but feel great after.

We’ll start you off with the more relaxing sequence.

Now, it should be noted there is a debate on the actual benefits of “self-myofascial release.” There are some claims that myofascial release will help flexibility and muscle recovery. There are others that say that’s bogus.

What does the science say?

Some of it’s supported:

  • A foam roller has been shown to help the range of hip motion in soccer players[1].
  • Rolling massages can help alleviate muscle soreness[2].

Some of it is not supported:

  • Foam rolling use doesn’t appear to impact the length of muscle[3].
  • A study found no help in relieving “tightness” in the hamstring[4].

So yeah, the science isn’t definitive on this. But there does seem to be a lot of anecdotal evidence praising foam rollers.

My take? I think the foam roller is a great tool for temporary pain relief as long as it’s used correctly, but you can’t ignore what caused the soreness in the first place!

Want help getting started?

Beginner foam roller exercises

All you need is some type of roller and some floor space. A yoga mat would be helpful but not required.

We’ll go over four simple exercises to get you going with a foam roller. Think of the following as a relaxing sequence:

  • Thoracic Spine
  • Glutes (both sides)
  • Quads (one at a time)
  • Abductors

Take each move for about 20-30 seconds. Hold for major sore spots. Breath deeply, calmly.

I asked Matt Myers, one of our online coaches at Nerd Fitness – he’s hilarious but don’t tell him I said that – to guide you through these moves in this quick video.

Yes, that’s a T-Rex on a foam roller. You’re welcome:

That’s it. Keep it simple at first.

You can do this sequence after a workout. Or even before. Or all by itself. Go wild.

Common mistakes when using a foam roller

I want to make an important point on foam rollers:

As mentioned, one of the benefits is their ability to help with painful or tight areas.

However, it’s important to remember that using a foam roller won’t treat the root cause of the pain. It’s only going to help  treat the symptom by easing pain.

As the studies above point out, it’s not quite clear how myofascial release does this.

What I’m trying to say: If you’re working out incorrectly, or in pain because of a sedentary lifestyle, or some other type of issue, using a foam roller won’t fix it. It’ll only help you manage the discomfort. You’ll potentially need outside help to uncover the real issue that’s causing the problem in the first place.

The foam roller is the equivalent of using painkillers to help a broken foot, without first setting any of the bones correctly, or asking the question “Why did you think kicking that brick wall was a good idea in the first place?”

Eek.

So use the foam roller to manage discomfort, but know that it’s not a panacea (boy do I love that word) for all of your ailments and movement issues!

If you’re not sure if you are training correctly, or you’re struggling to not always be dealing with pulled or sore muscles, we are here to help. Matt from our video above, is part of the experienced, fun, non-judgmental staff that make up the Nerd Fitness 1-on-1 Online Coaching Program. Our team can help with many different types of exercises, with or without a roller. Plus, if you’re struggling with weight loss, they can help there too.

Want to see if we are a good fit for each other? Click on the big image below to schedule a free consultation with our Team (you’ll probably speak with Big Red, he’s good people):

Foam roller recommendations

You now know a foam roller can be a super helpful tool to manage pain and discomfort. And thanks to Matt, you even know how to use one.

Want to buy one? You need to think about the following:

  • Density: the denser the roller, the more intense the massage you’ll receive.
  • Texture: some rollers will have ridges and knots to help dig into your muscle and tissue.
  • Shape and size: big ones, small ones, some as big as your head. You can get a foam roller in just about every size you could want.

There’s a lot to consider, but here’s some solid choices:

Boom. That’ll give you some options to… get rolling.

In appreciation of self care

Our lives are busy. It can be a real challenge to carve out time to take care of ourselves. But it’s important that we do. Outside of anyone else, we are in the best position to help ourselves (duh). Even if it’s only for five minutes and with a piece of foam.

Foam rolling is a great way to manage tightness and pain from the comfort of your own home. If you don’t have one, you can also use household items like a tennis ball to attack the “knots” that develop in our bodies. Or, go the other way and spring for a licensed massage[5].

The importance is self care. Try the foam roller the next time you’re at the gym. Or get one sent to your home. It’s a fun toy to have around.

Breathe in now, breathe out, and as Fred Durst of Limp Bizkit taught us: “just keep rollin’ baby.”

What do you think? Love foam rollers? Or think they are a tripping hazard at the gym? Want more advanced exercises? Let us know!

-Steve

PS: I tried my hardest to not make a Limp Bizkit reference in this post. Almost made it.

PPS: If you want help playing with all the other toys at the gym, I’ll mention one last time our 1-on-1 Coaching program. We can help make all the equipment at any fitness facility way less scary. Or teach you how to workout from home so you can skip the whole place altogether.

###

ALL Photos Sources can be found in this footnote here[6].

Footnotes    ( returns to text)

  1. Study on those soccer players here.
  2. The study on foam rolling and muscle soreness is right here
  3. Muscle length study is right here.
  4. Scope out that hamstring investigation at this link.
  5. Treat yo’self!
  6. Photo: foam roller, lego doctor, stormtroopers, noodles, foam roller II, mountain,

Protein Shake Recipes For The Adventurous: Pomegranate-Berry Shake

A protein shake – or smoothies as some people like to call them – can be as basic or as complicated as you want. We like to be adventurous here and find recipes that are, well, maybe not the first thing you would think of.

Many people, most in fact, spice up their basic protein shake. Most shakes come in multiple flavors: vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, etc. But that can get boring. So take some time to make it more interesting. We will have more recipes coming soon.

Click here to learn more about protein drinks for people getting older.

Today’s Protein Shake Recipe: Pomegranate-Berry Shake

Today’s recipe is for the Pomegranate-Berry Shake. Because pomegranate is known to be a great antioxidant this is a winner.  And berries are a good way to sweeten the taste of almost anything. So why not combine the two?

The fruit is going to add some natural sugar to your protein shake, but the key word here is “natural“. You can also mix it up by using different berries to see what tastes the best for you. Here it is:

Directions: Shakes taste best cold. Blend all ingredients together with ice in a blender until creamy.

Pomegranate-Berry Shake

pomegranate-berry protein shake
pomegranate-berry protein shake

2 scoops vanilla protein shake mix
½ cup frozen mixed berries
½ cup pomegranate juice
10 oz. water
Cinnamon (optional)

Nutrition facts:Calories: 240,Protein: 21 g, Fat: 3 g, Carb: 36 g, Fiber: 8 g, Sugars: 22 g (from fruit)

 

Tell me what you think below in the comments. I want to hear. Especially if you have been adventurous and tried out the this recipe or the Apple Pie Shake recipe.

Just send me a message if you would like to know more about the protein shake mix that we recommend.

You can use the contact page. Or reach me on Twitter @2healthylife

Have a great week!

Tom

Tom

4 Posture Exercises to Do While Sitting at Your Desk

Source https://www.sonima.com/fitness/posture-exercises/

“Between commuting, office jobs, and time in front of the TV, we love to sit,” says Brian Bradley, fitness director of Elev8d Fitness, the new 8-minute home workout program developed by the experts of Sonima.

You’ve probably already heard, but this sitting habit is really, really bad for you. According to a 2017 study in Annals of Internal Medicine, even if you exercise regularly, not moving for excessively long periods of time increases your risk for early death. It can also negatively affect your posture by conditioning your body to position itself in an unnatural way. Unfortunately, sitting is inevitable. But rather than resigning yourself to a sedentary slump, you can train for sitting in order to avoid some of its negative effects, Bradley says. In fact, there are certain movements you can practice while sitting in a chair to improve your posture and overall well-being.

How Does Sitting Affect Your Posture?

The way the body tilts and torques to sit in a chair is in opposition to natural, functional alignment. When you sit, your pelvis tilts back and your butt tucks under. This deactivates your hips so that they’re no longer supporting the top half your frame or engaging your glutes and core to support your spine. As a result, your spine shifts into one long C-curve instead of the natural S shape. When working at a desk, your shoulders round as your hands reach for your keyboard, and your head juts forward to get closer to the computer screen.

This “desk slump” affects more than just your ability to stand up straight—it may also contribute to your mid-afternoon energy slump. Korean researchers found the posture most of us take on while sitting and typing on our phones actually restricts our ability to breathe properly and efficiently. And lack of oxygen translates to less energy and lower concentration, Bradley points out.

If you think you’re exempt from this biomechanical malfunction, consider this: A 2015 Australian study found when people sat in a position that felt natural to them, they naturally slumped at the lumbar spine. When they were encouraged to correct their position just based on their own intuition, their lumbar angle was still overly curved. In other words: We need directions.


Related: An Active Alignment Sequence for Misaligned Shoulders


How Can Posture Exercises Help?

“The amazing thing is that we can correct our posture by just moving the body the way in was designed to naturally move,” says Bradley. “To put your body back in the most ideal alignment you need to use 100 percent of your deep, stabilizing muscles.”

That’s why the experts of Sonima developed Elev8d Fitness based on this straightforward principle. The at-home workouts incorporate a variety of dynamic movements that reset alignment. By adjusting and stabilizing key muscle groups, the exercises create foundational strength and symmetry in the body.

Although daily Elev8d Fitness workouts are the most comprehensive solution for improving posture, you can apply the following elemental movements while sitting at a desk or on the couch to dramatically enhance the quality of your sitting position. Do this routine in the order specified halfway through every sitting session (i.e., a day at the office, a two-hour train ride). Not only will you find yourself standing straighter after hours spent sitting, you’ll also experience improved blood flow and deeper breathing which boost oxygen flow for increased acuity and improved focus


Related: A Body-Balancing Exercise Routine for Drivers


Chair Arm Circles | 40x each direction


1. Put your thumbs up, and fold your fingers forward so that the tips are on the top pads of your palms.

2. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground, and pointed straight ahead.

3. Extend your arms directly sideways, straight out. Point your thumbs forward, palms down, and pinch your shoulder blades back.

4. Move your arms up and forward in a circular motion 40 times. Keep your shoulder blades pinched.

5. Next, flip your hands palms up, thumbs pointed backward, and move your arms up and backwards in circles 40 times.

Cats and Dogs in Chair | 5x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Beginning the movement at the hip, roll your back slowly upwards so that it finishes in a rounded position like a mad cat, your head down, chin resting on your chest. The lower half your back should be touching the chair back but not your shoulders.

3. Then, beginning the movement with the hip, lower your back into an inverse arch, your head and tailbone up, your shoulder blades pinching toward each other. Your low back and shoulders should be touching the chair back, but not your mid-back.

4. Repeat 5 times each direction.

Da Vinci’s in a Chair | 5x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Make sure to create a small arch in your lower back, reestablishing the natural S curve.

3. Extend your arms straight to the side, your hands palms-forward with the fingers spread wide.

4. Keeping your hips and head stable, bend to one side using just the spine and bend back to the other side.

Cats and Dogs in Chair | 10x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Beginning the movement at the hip, roll your back slowly upwards so that it finishes in a rounded position like a mad cat, your head down, chin resting on your chest. The lower half your back should be touching the chair back but not your shoulders.

3. Then, beginning the movement with the hip, lower your back into an inverse arch, your head and tailbone up, your shoulder blades pinching toward each other. Your low back and shoulders should be touching the chair back, but not your mid-back.

4. Repeat 10 times each direction.

The post 4 Posture Exercises to Do While Sitting at Your Desk appeared first on Sonima.

Source https://www.sonima.com/fitness/posture-exercises/

“Between commuting, office jobs, and time in front of the TV, we love to sit,” says Brian Bradley, fitness director of Elev8d Fitness, the new 8-minute home workout program developed by the experts of Sonima.

You’ve probably already heard, but this sitting habit is really, really bad for you. According to a 2017 study in Annals of Internal Medicine, even if you exercise regularly, not moving for excessively long periods of time increases your risk for early death. It can also negatively affect your posture by conditioning your body to position itself in an unnatural way. Unfortunately, sitting is inevitable. But rather than resigning yourself to a sedentary slump, you can train for sitting in order to avoid some of its negative effects, Bradley says. In fact, there are certain movements you can practice while sitting in a chair to improve your posture and overall well-being.

How Does Sitting Affect Your Posture?

The way the body tilts and torques to sit in a chair is in opposition to natural, functional alignment. When you sit, your pelvis tilts back and your butt tucks under. This deactivates your hips so that they’re no longer supporting the top half your frame or engaging your glutes and core to support your spine. As a result, your spine shifts into one long C-curve instead of the natural S shape. When working at a desk, your shoulders round as your hands reach for your keyboard, and your head juts forward to get closer to the computer screen.

This “desk slump” affects more than just your ability to stand up straight—it may also contribute to your mid-afternoon energy slump. Korean researchers found the posture most of us take on while sitting and typing on our phones actually restricts our ability to breathe properly and efficiently. And lack of oxygen translates to less energy and lower concentration, Bradley points out.

If you think you’re exempt from this biomechanical malfunction, consider this: A 2015 Australian study found when people sat in a position that felt natural to them, they naturally slumped at the lumbar spine. When they were encouraged to correct their position just based on their own intuition, their lumbar angle was still overly curved. In other words: We need directions.


Related: An Active Alignment Sequence for Misaligned Shoulders


How Can Posture Exercises Help?

“The amazing thing is that we can correct our posture by just moving the body the way in was designed to naturally move,” says Bradley. “To put your body back in the most ideal alignment you need to use 100 percent of your deep, stabilizing muscles.”

That’s why the experts of Sonima developed Elev8d Fitness based on this straightforward principle. The at-home workouts incorporate a variety of dynamic movements that reset alignment. By adjusting and stabilizing key muscle groups, the exercises create foundational strength and symmetry in the body.

Although daily Elev8d Fitness workouts are the most comprehensive solution for improving posture, you can apply the following elemental movements while sitting at a desk or on the couch to dramatically enhance the quality of your sitting position. Do this routine in the order specified halfway through every sitting session (i.e., a day at the office, a two-hour train ride). Not only will you find yourself standing straighter after hours spent sitting, you’ll also experience improved blood flow and deeper breathing which boost oxygen flow for increased acuity and improved focus


Related: A Body-Balancing Exercise Routine for Drivers


Chair Arm Circles | 40x each direction


1. Put your thumbs up, and fold your fingers forward so that the tips are on the top pads of your palms.

2. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground, and pointed straight ahead.

3. Extend your arms directly sideways, straight out. Point your thumbs forward, palms down, and pinch your shoulder blades back.

4. Move your arms up and forward in a circular motion 40 times. Keep your shoulder blades pinched.

5. Next, flip your hands palms up, thumbs pointed backward, and move your arms up and backwards in circles 40 times.

Cats and Dogs in Chair | 5x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Beginning the movement at the hip, roll your back slowly upwards so that it finishes in a rounded position like a mad cat, your head down, chin resting on your chest. The lower half your back should be touching the chair back but not your shoulders.

3. Then, beginning the movement with the hip, lower your back into an inverse arch, your head and tailbone up, your shoulder blades pinching toward each other. Your low back and shoulders should be touching the chair back, but not your mid-back.

4. Repeat 5 times each direction.

Da Vinci’s in a Chair | 5x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Make sure to create a small arch in your lower back, reestablishing the natural S curve.

3. Extend your arms straight to the side, your hands palms-forward with the fingers spread wide.

4. Keeping your hips and head stable, bend to one side using just the spine and bend back to the other side.

Cats and Dogs in Chair | 10x each direction


1. Sit in a chair with your feet hip-width apart, flat on the ground and pointed straight ahead.

2. Beginning the movement at the hip, roll your back slowly upwards so that it finishes in a rounded position like a mad cat, your head down, chin resting on your chest. The lower half your back should be touching the chair back but not your shoulders.

3. Then, beginning the movement with the hip, lower your back into an inverse arch, your head and tailbone up, your shoulder blades pinching toward each other. Your low back and shoulders should be touching the chair back, but not your mid-back.

4. Repeat 10 times each direction.

The post 4 Posture Exercises to Do While Sitting at Your Desk appeared first on Sonima.

MIND MATTERS – WOMEN, TECHNOLOGY & MENTAL HEALTH

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/better-thinking/mind-matters-women-technology-mental-health

by Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Mental health is as important as physical health, yet almost 50% of those suffering from depression or anxiety will not seek medical support, in part, due to stigma. On Tuesday October 23, join Women’s Brain……

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/better-thinking/mind-matters-women-technology-mental-health

by Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Mental health is as important as physical health, yet almost 50% of those suffering from depression or anxiety will not seek medical support, in part, due to stigma. On Tuesday October 23, join Women’s Brain……

Nearly 3,000 Join New Crunch Gym on Record First Day of Pre-Opening Sales

Source https://www.clubindustry.com/news-central/nearly-3000-join-new-crunch-gym-record-first-day-pre-opening-sales

Club Industry was not involved in the creation of this content.

RIVERVIEW, Fla., October 10, 2018 – Crunch Franchise today announced that 2,915 memberships were sold for the Crunch gym opening in Riverview, Florida, on the first day of its pre-open

Source https://www.clubindustry.com/news-central/nearly-3000-join-new-crunch-gym-record-first-day-pre-opening-sales

Club Industry was not involved in the creation of this content.

RIVERVIEW, Fla., October 10, 2018 – Crunch Franchise today announced that 2,915 memberships were sold for the Crunch gym opening in Riverview, Florida, on the first day of its pre-open

Protein Shake Recipes For The Adventurous: Apple Pie Shake

A protein shake – or smoothies as some people like to call them – can be as basic or as complicated as you want. We like to be adventurous here and find recipes that are, well, maybe not the first thing you would think of.

Many people, most in fact, spice up their basic protein shake. Most shakes come in multiple flavors: vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, etc. But that can get boring. So take some time to spice it up. We will have more recipes coming soon.

Click here to learn more about protein drinks for people getting older.

Today’s Protein Shake Recipe: Apple Pie Shake

Today we want to show you the Apple Pie Shake. Because the holidays are coming up. (Sooner than we might want!) And apple pie is likely to be one of your desserts. So why not create a protein shake that tastes just like Grandma’s Old Fashioned Apple Pie. Okay, maybe we are stretching it. (Sorry Grandma) Here it is:

Directions: Shakes taste best cold. Blend all ingredients together with ice in a blender until creamy.

Protein Shake Apple Pie Smoothie
Apple cinnamon smoothie on wooden rustic table. Fall inspired breakfast. Apple pie smoothie.

Apple Pie Shake
2 scoops of vanilla shake mix
1 tart apple, core removed
2 Tbsp rolled oats
Juice of ½ lemon
10 oz. water
Cinnamon (optional)

Nutrition facts:Calories: 270, Protein: 21 g, Fat: 4 g, Carb: 40 g, Fiber: 13 g, Sugars: 17 g (from fruit)

Tell me what you think below in the comments. I want to hear. Especially if you have been adventurous and tried out the Apple Pie Shake recipe.

Just send me a message if you would like to know more about the protein shake mix that we recommend.

You can use the contact page. Or reach me on Twitter @2healthylife

Have a great week!

Tom

How Highly Sensitive People Can Feel More Fulfilled in Their Relationships

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tinybuddha/~3/yLXfSdZT14Y/

“Truth can be stated in a thousand different ways, yet each one can be true.” ~Swami Vivekananda

Highly sensitive people naturally bring some really beautiful, love-promoting qualities to their romantic partnerships. But these same qualities can sometimes end up undermining the strength of the relationship. This was true for me in my first marriage and led, in part, to it ending in divorce.

We HSPs are known for our caring, conscientious, and considerate natures. It matters deeply to us that we do our best to be loyal and caring in our relationships.

And because we tend to have high standards for ourselves, and work hard at being kind supportive friends and lovers, we often successfully create strong intimate bonds with others.

We also have a knack for being aware of the needs of others. Our ability to pick up on subtle cues makes them feel deeply understood and cared for. On top of all of this, we tend to think deeply about our love relationships, giving them much of our mental and emotional energy.

This is all really wonderful for the lucky partner of a highly sensitive person. It’s part of why they felt drawn to you and nurtured, safe, and loved with you. But, things can go downhill fast when our significant other doesn’t behave the same way.

It’s human nature to be unable to deeply understand what it’s like to live another’s experience. Though HSP’s tend to be quite empathic, it’s still nearly impossible to really see through our partners’ eyes. This can be the source of so much pain.

In my first marriage, I often wondered why I seemed to be the one to show more interest in the health of the relationship. I would ask myself things like, “How can he be okay with going to bed when things aren’t resolved between us?” “Does he even notice I’m sad?” “Doesn’t he want to help me feel better?” “What’s wrong with him that he doesn’t think to offer some kind words?”

Because those were things I naturally did for him.

Those high standards I had for myself about relationships? I had them for him, too. When he didn’t meet my ideas about how we should be with each other, I would think something was wrong.

I’d think his lack of consideration and awareness meant he didn’t love me as much as I loved him, that maybe I wasn’t enough for him. Thinking that really hurt.

That pain, unfortunately, only led to me acting far below my own high standards for myself. Because when we humans feel hurt, we say and do things we wouldn’t otherwise.

I’d complain, maybe curl up and cry, or give him the cold shoulder. I’d point out how he was falling short, question why —if he really loved me— he wasn’t more affectionate, more aware of my feelings, more interested in resolving issues—in short, more like I was naturally (well, when I wasn’t upset!).

We’d end up in long conversations that never concluded satisfactorily. He’d end up feeling like he wasn’t doing good enough.

Because I was aware of subtle shifts in him, I could see how badly I was affecting him. And that would only lead to me feeling guilty and bad about myself, which made things even worse. It seemed like a rock and a hard place that we didn’t know how to get out of. After many years of this, we ended our marriage.

What a wake up call! Since then I’ve learned so much and changed my life in major ways, and learned to work with my high sensitivity in ways that not only support me, but also my romantic relationship. I am now very happily remarried.

Though I had to learn the hard way, I now have a lot to share with others about how to have a mutually loving, supportive, and connected intimate relationship as an HSP.

Assuming you’re in a healthy, non-abusive relationship, these three tips can help you feel more fulfilled in love and be an amazing life partner.

1. Honor differences, yours and theirs!

Just as they must learn to accept our sensitive natures, we must understand that others may not have our superpowers of high conscientiousness, deep caring attentiveness to others, and the uncanny ability to know just what they most need to feel good.

They may not want to resolve issues as thoroughly as we do, because they may not feel things as intensely and as long as you do. They might not enjoy processing or getting to the heart of the matter the way you do—it may even make them really uncomfortable.

All this can be especially true if your partner’s male, because of some big brain and cultural differences between males’ and females’ approach to relating with others. So he may not be attuned to the play of emotion across your face—or quick to try to make things right for you.

If you fight to change his brain’s wiring, you’re fighting a losing battle. Instead, when you feel like you know better than he does about how to love well, remind yourself, it’s not better, it’s just different.

2. Stop holding your partner to unreachable standards.

Apples will never be as juicy as watermelon! But you can’t make a great pie out of watermelon.

When I let go of my own high, unrealistic standards and stop comparing I can actually see the way he does show his care and is loving me. Which is what we all ultimately want: to feel cherished and supported.

Maybe your partner doesn’t read your mind and give you that hug when you want it most, but he does make kind gestures like offering to take the kids so you can have some quiet time to yourself, or she invites you on some adventure she’s excited about. Look for and enjoy the different gifts your partner brings to the relationship. Let them spice up your life.

Would you really want a clone of yourself for a partner, anyway?

3. Attend to yourself.

We need to keep coming back to giving ourselves loving attention, especially as HSPs.

When I don’t, I feel empty and needy, and tend to look to my husband to fix it. Which often backfires and I feel even worse.

When I get complainy or needy or act in ways I don’t like, I know it means I need to pause and notice what I really need. And then take action on it. If it’s something my husband can do for me, I can always ask lovingly for it, without expecting he’ll be willing or able.

So let them be who they are, and take care of who you are. Nothing fills us up like self-appreciation and caring for yourself the way you like to care for others.

My love life changed so much once I deeply understood that my way is just One Way, not The Way to express love for another human being. I can now really feel and appreciate my husband’s unique ways of loving me, and I receive them as big gifts. That allows me to feel truly fulfilled and to easily reciprocate to my sweet husband—in my own unique and special way.

About Hannah Brooks

Hannah Brooks is a Relationship Coach who helps caring, sensitive, deep-feeling women create the supportive, loving, and genuinely connected relationship they really want with their partner. For further tips and guidance check our her free toolkit, 3 Essential Steps to a More Loving Relationship, Even When You Feel Irritable, Resentful, or Disconnected. Find her at lifeisworthloving.com.

Get in the conversation! Click here to leave a comment on the site.

The post How Highly Sensitive People Can Feel More Fulfilled in Their Relationships appeared first on Tiny Buddha.

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tinybuddha/~3/yLXfSdZT14Y/

“Truth can be stated in a thousand different ways, yet each one can be true.” ~Swami Vivekananda

Highly sensitive people naturally bring some really beautiful, love-promoting qualities to their romantic partnerships. But these same qualities can sometimes end up undermining the strength of the relationship. This was true for me in my first marriage and led, in part, to it ending in divorce.

We HSPs are known for our caring, conscientious, and considerate natures. It matters deeply to us that we do our best to be loyal and caring in our relationships.

And because we tend to have high standards for ourselves, and work hard at being kind supportive friends and lovers, we often successfully create strong intimate bonds with others.

We also have a knack for being aware of the needs of others. Our ability to pick up on subtle cues makes them feel deeply understood and cared for. On top of all of this, we tend to think deeply about our love relationships, giving them much of our mental and emotional energy.

This is all really wonderful for the lucky partner of a highly sensitive person. It’s part of why they felt drawn to you and nurtured, safe, and loved with you. But, things can go downhill fast when our significant other doesn’t behave the same way.

It’s human nature to be unable to deeply understand what it’s like to live another’s experience. Though HSP’s tend to be quite empathic, it’s still nearly impossible to really see through our partners’ eyes. This can be the source of so much pain.

In my first marriage, I often wondered why I seemed to be the one to show more interest in the health of the relationship. I would ask myself things like, “How can he be okay with going to bed when things aren’t resolved between us?” “Does he even notice I’m sad?” “Doesn’t he want to help me feel better?” “What’s wrong with him that he doesn’t think to offer some kind words?”

Because those were things I naturally did for him.

Those high standards I had for myself about relationships? I had them for him, too. When he didn’t meet my ideas about how we should be with each other, I would think something was wrong.

I’d think his lack of consideration and awareness meant he didn’t love me as much as I loved him, that maybe I wasn’t enough for him. Thinking that really hurt.

That pain, unfortunately, only led to me acting far below my own high standards for myself. Because when we humans feel hurt, we say and do things we wouldn’t otherwise.

I’d complain, maybe curl up and cry, or give him the cold shoulder. I’d point out how he was falling short, question why —if he really loved me— he wasn’t more affectionate, more aware of my feelings, more interested in resolving issues—in short, more like I was naturally (well, when I wasn’t upset!).

We’d end up in long conversations that never concluded satisfactorily. He’d end up feeling like he wasn’t doing good enough.

Because I was aware of subtle shifts in him, I could see how badly I was affecting him. And that would only lead to me feeling guilty and bad about myself, which made things even worse. It seemed like a rock and a hard place that we didn’t know how to get out of. After many years of this, we ended our marriage.

What a wake up call! Since then I’ve learned so much and changed my life in major ways, and learned to work with my high sensitivity in ways that not only support me, but also my romantic relationship. I am now very happily remarried.

Though I had to learn the hard way, I now have a lot to share with others about how to have a mutually loving, supportive, and connected intimate relationship as an HSP.

Assuming you’re in a healthy, non-abusive relationship, these three tips can help you feel more fulfilled in love and be an amazing life partner.

1. Honor differences, yours and theirs!

Just as they must learn to accept our sensitive natures, we must understand that others may not have our superpowers of high conscientiousness, deep caring attentiveness to others, and the uncanny ability to know just what they most need to feel good.

They may not want to resolve issues as thoroughly as we do, because they may not feel things as intensely and as long as you do. They might not enjoy processing or getting to the heart of the matter the way you do—it may even make them really uncomfortable.

All this can be especially true if your partner’s male, because of some big brain and cultural differences between males’ and females’ approach to relating with others. So he may not be attuned to the play of emotion across your face—or quick to try to make things right for you.

If you fight to change his brain’s wiring, you’re fighting a losing battle. Instead, when you feel like you know better than he does about how to love well, remind yourself, it’s not better, it’s just different.

2. Stop holding your partner to unreachable standards.

Apples will never be as juicy as watermelon! But you can’t make a great pie out of watermelon.

When I let go of my own high, unrealistic standards and stop comparing I can actually see the way he does show his care and is loving me. Which is what we all ultimately want: to feel cherished and supported.

Maybe your partner doesn’t read your mind and give you that hug when you want it most, but he does make kind gestures like offering to take the kids so you can have some quiet time to yourself, or she invites you on some adventure she’s excited about. Look for and enjoy the different gifts your partner brings to the relationship. Let them spice up your life.

Would you really want a clone of yourself for a partner, anyway?

3. Attend to yourself.

We need to keep coming back to giving ourselves loving attention, especially as HSPs.

When I don’t, I feel empty and needy, and tend to look to my husband to fix it. Which often backfires and I feel even worse.

When I get complainy or needy or act in ways I don’t like, I know it means I need to pause and notice what I really need. And then take action on it. If it’s something my husband can do for me, I can always ask lovingly for it, without expecting he’ll be willing or able.

So let them be who they are, and take care of who you are. Nothing fills us up like self-appreciation and caring for yourself the way you like to care for others.

My love life changed so much once I deeply understood that my way is just One Way, not The Way to express love for another human being. I can now really feel and appreciate my husband’s unique ways of loving me, and I receive them as big gifts. That allows me to feel truly fulfilled and to easily reciprocate to my sweet husband—in my own unique and special way.

About Hannah Brooks

Hannah Brooks is a Relationship Coach who helps caring, sensitive, deep-feeling women create the supportive, loving, and genuinely connected relationship they really want with their partner. For further tips and guidance check our her free toolkit, 3 Essential Steps to a More Loving Relationship, Even When You Feel Irritable, Resentful, or Disconnected. Find her at lifeisworthloving.com.

Get in the conversation! Click here to leave a comment on the site.

The post How Highly Sensitive People Can Feel More Fulfilled in Their Relationships appeared first on Tiny Buddha.

How to Use the 7 Chakras to Get in Touch with Personal Vitality

Source http://dailycupofyoga.com/2018/09/16/how-to-use-the-7-chakras-to-get-in-touch-with-personal-vitality/

 

We can use chakra meditation to help understand the nuances of our body, pinpoint our areas of weakness or overuse, and bring healing to those specific energetic centers.

Each of the chakras has traditional meanings that help us focus on tendencies that characterize the specific energy center.  If we meditate upon each center in a progressive fashion from bottom to top, we become acquainted with a more nuanced understanding of our deepest self.  By accessing each center or wheel, we activate its innate dynamism which propels us to a new level of vibrancy.

The first chakra, Muladhara or Root Chakra, originates from the base of our spine and governs down through the bottom of our feet.  Muladhara, which means “root-support,” is traditionally pictured as red.  By breathing deeply into this chakra with love and healing light, we both wash away any impurities and also strengthen our sense of stability and groundedness in our lives.  By focusing on the root chakra, we gain confidence and serenity and a foundation of security.

The second chakra, Svadhisthana or Sacral Chakra, is situated just below the navel and the small of the back.  Svadhistana is translated as “one’s home,” “loveliness,” or “sweetness.”  It is conceived as an orange energy.  By nurturing the “sweetness” in our sacral chakra, we can heal sexual woundedness and cultivate our natural sensuality, creativity, and enthusiasm for life itself.  This home of “sweetness” is the wellspring of vitality.

The third chakra, Manipura or Stomach Chakra, oversees our will and is lit by the color yellow, like the sun.  Manipura is often translated as the “place of jewels.” Instead of overusing our will and willpower by pushing ourselves or others around, we can learn to breath in the yellow light of the sun to remind ourselves to release the will and willfulness.  When we relinquish our pushiness, we activate a subtle—more gracious and yet more effective—source of power.  Manipura is the cache of our life’s purpose and that is why it is called the “place of jewels.”  When we breath into this chakra, we allow our destiny to manifest easily instead of rushing around chaotically.

The fourth chakra, the Heart Chakra or Anahata, is visualized with the color green.  Green is the color of nature—its peacefulness, growth, and verdancy.  The word Anahata means “whole” or “unbroken.”  By breathing into our heart center, we can heal all brokenness, bitterness, and loneliness.  The heart chakra’s intrinsic “unbrokenness” promises us that whatever happens in this life, we can always return to the heart chakra to become whole again.  We can even regrow our innocence here.

The fifth chakra, Vishuddha or Throat Chakra, directs the voice and the breath with its sky-blue light.  Vishuddha means “pure,” so as we breath into this chakra, we purify our lives.  The throat chakra is the passageway from the central body to the head; therefore, when we heal the throat chakra, we become more cognizant of our bodies and the wisdom that is housed there—an embodied form of integrity.  Sending healing and loving breath to our throat chakra brings us into honesty as well as authenticity.  Through the breath, we clarify ourselves, which is why many meditation practices focus on the breath.  Vishuddha is the hall of purified communication.

Depicted as the blue violet of the night sky, the sixth chakra, Ajna, often called the Third Eye, is located on the forehead and between the eyebrows.  Ajna means “knowing” or “perception.”  Here is the seat of our imagistic eye.  By opening our third eye, we begin to see and know deeply into the lives of others and into the nature of reality itself.  Imagination and empathy are married in this chakra, showing us the real meaning of insight.  Our intuition and wisdom emerge when we allow our third eye to open.  By breathing light and love into Ajna, we activate an ability to perceive the inner workings of other humans, nonhuman animals, plants, and the material world.

On the crown of the head or slightly above the crown, the seventh chakra is called the Crown Chakra or SahasraraSahasrara means “thousand-petalled,” “thousand-spoked,” or “thousand.”  Thousand traditionally is the number of infinity: in other words, this chakra refers to our Infinite Nature.  The Crown Chakra is often experienced as infused with lavender or white light.  As we move up into our highest chakra, bringing lucidity and openness through our breath, we can clear our sense of confusion and awaken our awareness of what is sometimes called “cosmic consciousness,” “enlightenment,” or “knowledge of God.”  Regardless, the cleansing of our crown chakra brings a profound experience of serenity and even bliss.

As we practice chakra meditation, we will notice areas that we overuse or that feel weak.  By breathing gently into the particular chakra, we can ease the burden of that chakra and learn to balance our personalities.  Through balance and purification of the chakra energy centers, we access and increase our internal strength and health.

——————————

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Dr. Kaiya Ansorge.  Dr. Ansorge is academically trained in psychology, philosophical theology, and religion. She began practicing chakra meditation while living in India and found the practice transformative. She now leads chakra meditations regularly for groups and individuals in addition to other workshops, classes, and life coaching. You can find her and her free videos and audio pieces at www.kaiyaansorge.com. You can connect with her through Facebook or Twitter.

 

Read more on Daily Cup of Yoga


Opening The Throat Chakra: How Expressing Your Tru…

Communication – the human connection – is the key to personal and career success.” – Paul J. Meyer
It can be argued that your throat chakra is one …


Balancing Chakras with Yoga

Men of great knowledge actually found out about the chakras – their workings, their petals, their sounds, their infinity, their co-relationship, the…

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Source http://dailycupofyoga.com/2018/09/16/how-to-use-the-7-chakras-to-get-in-touch-with-personal-vitality/

 

We can use chakra meditation to help understand the nuances of our body, pinpoint our areas of weakness or overuse, and bring healing to those specific energetic centers.

Each of the chakras has traditional meanings that help us focus on tendencies that characterize the specific energy center.  If we meditate upon each center in a progressive fashion from bottom to top, we become acquainted with a more nuanced understanding of our deepest self.  By accessing each center or wheel, we activate its innate dynamism which propels us to a new level of vibrancy.

The first chakra, Muladhara or Root Chakra, originates from the base of our spine and governs down through the bottom of our feet.  Muladhara, which means “root-support,” is traditionally pictured as red.  By breathing deeply into this chakra with love and healing light, we both wash away any impurities and also strengthen our sense of stability and groundedness in our lives.  By focusing on the root chakra, we gain confidence and serenity and a foundation of security.

The second chakra, Svadhisthana or Sacral Chakra, is situated just below the navel and the small of the back.  Svadhistana is translated as “one’s home,” “loveliness,” or “sweetness.”  It is conceived as an orange energy.  By nurturing the “sweetness” in our sacral chakra, we can heal sexual woundedness and cultivate our natural sensuality, creativity, and enthusiasm for life itself.  This home of “sweetness” is the wellspring of vitality.

The third chakra, Manipura or Stomach Chakra, oversees our will and is lit by the color yellow, like the sun.  Manipura is often translated as the “place of jewels.” Instead of overusing our will and willpower by pushing ourselves or others around, we can learn to breath in the yellow light of the sun to remind ourselves to release the will and willfulness.  When we relinquish our pushiness, we activate a subtle—more gracious and yet more effective—source of power.  Manipura is the cache of our life’s purpose and that is why it is called the “place of jewels.”  When we breath into this chakra, we allow our destiny to manifest easily instead of rushing around chaotically.

The fourth chakra, the Heart Chakra or Anahata, is visualized with the color green.  Green is the color of nature—its peacefulness, growth, and verdancy.  The word Anahata means “whole” or “unbroken.”  By breathing into our heart center, we can heal all brokenness, bitterness, and loneliness.  The heart chakra’s intrinsic “unbrokenness” promises us that whatever happens in this life, we can always return to the heart chakra to become whole again.  We can even regrow our innocence here.

The fifth chakra, Vishuddha or Throat Chakra, directs the voice and the breath with its sky-blue light.  Vishuddha means “pure,” so as we breath into this chakra, we purify our lives.  The throat chakra is the passageway from the central body to the head; therefore, when we heal the throat chakra, we become more cognizant of our bodies and the wisdom that is housed there—an embodied form of integrity.  Sending healing and loving breath to our throat chakra brings us into honesty as well as authenticity.  Through the breath, we clarify ourselves, which is why many meditation practices focus on the breath.  Vishuddha is the hall of purified communication.

Depicted as the blue violet of the night sky, the sixth chakra, Ajna, often called the Third Eye, is located on the forehead and between the eyebrows.  Ajna means “knowing” or “perception.”  Here is the seat of our imagistic eye.  By opening our third eye, we begin to see and know deeply into the lives of others and into the nature of reality itself.  Imagination and empathy are married in this chakra, showing us the real meaning of insight.  Our intuition and wisdom emerge when we allow our third eye to open.  By breathing light and love into Ajna, we activate an ability to perceive the inner workings of other humans, nonhuman animals, plants, and the material world.

On the crown of the head or slightly above the crown, the seventh chakra is called the Crown Chakra or SahasraraSahasrara means “thousand-petalled,” “thousand-spoked,” or “thousand.”  Thousand traditionally is the number of infinity: in other words, this chakra refers to our Infinite Nature.  The Crown Chakra is often experienced as infused with lavender or white light.  As we move up into our highest chakra, bringing lucidity and openness through our breath, we can clear our sense of confusion and awaken our awareness of what is sometimes called “cosmic consciousness,” “enlightenment,” or “knowledge of God.”  Regardless, the cleansing of our crown chakra brings a profound experience of serenity and even bliss.

As we practice chakra meditation, we will notice areas that we overuse or that feel weak.  By breathing gently into the particular chakra, we can ease the burden of that chakra and learn to balance our personalities.  Through balance and purification of the chakra energy centers, we access and increase our internal strength and health.

——————————

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Dr. Kaiya Ansorge.  Dr. Ansorge is academically trained in psychology, philosophical theology, and religion. She began practicing chakra meditation while living in India and found the practice transformative. She now leads chakra meditations regularly for groups and individuals in addition to other workshops, classes, and life coaching. You can find her and her free videos and audio pieces at www.kaiyaansorge.com. You can connect with her through Facebook or Twitter.

 

Read more on Daily Cup of Yoga


Opening The Throat Chakra: How Expressing Your Tru…

Communication – the human connection – is the key to personal and career success.” – Paul J. Meyer
It can be argued that your throat chakra is one …


Balancing Chakras with Yoga

Men of great knowledge actually found out about the chakras – their workings, their petals, their sounds, their infinity, their co-relationship, the…

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The Surface Rules: Two Ways to Avoid Household Clutter

Source https://www.theminimalists.com/surface/

By Joshua Fields Millburn ·

Clutter accumulates quickly. Between our desks and coffee tables and countertops and dressers and credenzas and benches and sideboards and end tables and media consoles, our homes are outfitted with boundless surface area ripe for the accrual of stuff.

We pay it no mind until, one day, the detritus has metastasized to cover every flat surface. Stacks of unread magazines and unwanted junk mail. Piles of unfinished projects and unattended toys. Hoards of untidy appliances and unremarkable junk.

It didn’t happen overnight, but the chaos can be addressed relatively expediently. Personally, Rebecca and I have a couple rules in our household that help us avoid the mess.

Fewer surfaces. Whether you live in a tiny apartment or a McMansion, having fewer flat surfaces means fewer places for the rubbish to collect. Ergo, if a piece of furniture has a flat top, Bex and I refuse to bring it into our space unless its function is critical. Sure, we have a desk, a dresser, and a table in our home, but even those items remain clutterfree when not in use—hence the next rule.

Clear surfaces. Even with the appropriate amount of surface area, clutter will still find its way to the, ahem, surface. It’s as if our level surfaces are a magnet for miscellanea, so Bex and I have one more rule in our house: unless a possession is used every day, it doesn’t belong on a flat surface—it must find a new home in a drawer or a closet or, better yet, the donation bin. Thus, our desk remains empty, and our kitchen counters contain only a hot-water heater and a coffee grinder, while our blender, food processor, and Sodastream dwell inside their respective cabinets. Moreover, the kitchen items we haven’t used in 90 days have moved out of the house altogether.

Our one exception to the “clear surfaces” rule is art. We own a handful of well-curated objects—a pair of ceramics vases, a water-drop-shaped glass jug, a wooden blackbird statuette—that harmonize with our uncluttered surfaces in a way the debris of everyday life cannot. Oh, and books! We frequently adorn our clean surfaces with the books we’re currently reading, just for when we encounter a serendipitous reading situation.

The post The Surface Rules: Two Ways to Avoid Household Clutter appeared first on The Minimalists.

Source https://www.theminimalists.com/surface/

By Joshua Fields Millburn ·

Clutter accumulates quickly. Between our desks and coffee tables and countertops and dressers and credenzas and benches and sideboards and end tables and media consoles, our homes are outfitted with boundless surface area ripe for the accrual of stuff.

We pay it no mind until, one day, the detritus has metastasized to cover every flat surface. Stacks of unread magazines and unwanted junk mail. Piles of unfinished projects and unattended toys. Hoards of untidy appliances and unremarkable junk.

It didn’t happen overnight, but the chaos can be addressed relatively expediently. Personally, Rebecca and I have a couple rules in our household that help us avoid the mess.

Fewer surfaces. Whether you live in a tiny apartment or a McMansion, having fewer flat surfaces means fewer places for the rubbish to collect. Ergo, if a piece of furniture has a flat top, Bex and I refuse to bring it into our space unless its function is critical. Sure, we have a desk, a dresser, and a table in our home, but even those items remain clutterfree when not in use—hence the next rule.

Clear surfaces. Even with the appropriate amount of surface area, clutter will still find its way to the, ahem, surface. It’s as if our level surfaces are a magnet for miscellanea, so Bex and I have one more rule in our house: unless a possession is used every day, it doesn’t belong on a flat surface—it must find a new home in a drawer or a closet or, better yet, the donation bin. Thus, our desk remains empty, and our kitchen counters contain only a hot-water heater and a coffee grinder, while our blender, food processor, and Sodastream dwell inside their respective cabinets. Moreover, the kitchen items we haven’t used in 90 days have moved out of the house altogether.

Our one exception to the “clear surfaces” rule is art. We own a handful of well-curated objects—a pair of ceramics vases, a water-drop-shaped glass jug, a wooden blackbird statuette—that harmonize with our uncluttered surfaces in a way the debris of everyday life cannot. Oh, and books! We frequently adorn our clean surfaces with the books we’re currently reading, just for when we encounter a serendipitous reading situation.

The post The Surface Rules: Two Ways to Avoid Household Clutter appeared first on The Minimalists.

Healthy Aging: 6 Reasons Protein Drinks Are Right At Any Age

Are protein drinks just for the young? Think again.

Mom and Dad

Protein drinks are common these days. And for good reason. They can be a source of balanced nutrition, improved health, and even for losing weight. But what about if you are getting older? Should you consider adding protein drinks to your  diet?

Questions to Ask

Here are 6 questions for older adults – and their children or caregivers – to ask:

  1. Am I getting enough nutrition? As we get older we need to make sure we are getting all of the nutrition we need. And that can be challenging. Many older people get into the habit of eating what they have always eaten – when they might have been more active. Or eat too much: especially of the wrong thing. Or sometimes they just don’t eat enough. By including a well-balanced protein drink, they can be assured of getting the needed nutrition.
  2. Am I eating less because I just don’t want to take the time to cook? Cooking can be a young person’s activity. Older, less-active adults may decide that it isn’t worth the time and effort to prepare meals. So they may skip them or prepare what is quick and easy. That approach can sometimes result in eating “empty” calories that only add on weight at a time when you need it the least.
  3. Do I have trouble shopping? Depending on your situation it may be less convenient to do grocery shopping than in the past. Maybe you have a caregiver or family member who can help you out. (Good for you if you are in that situation!) As shopping becomes more of a chore when older adults become less active they sometimes rely on simpler, less nutritious alternative.
  4. Am I spending too much on food? Protein drinks are not always cheap. Especially when you want to make sure you are getting high quality. Protein drinks as meal replacements can run around $3 per meal which is not an expensive alternative. Now we don’t recommend that older people only consume protein drinks for all of their meals just based on cost. And for other reasons. But there is no reason to exclude them from you diet just because you think they might be too expensive.
  5. Do I have trouble feeding myself? Now this is a tricky one. Many older adults may find it difficult to use eating utensils. No one wants to rely on others to feed them from a plate. (I know I wouldn’t.) Because protein drinks can be drunk through a straw, it can be a good solution.
  6. What would my doctor say about including protein drinks in my diet? You always want to include your doctor in any discussion that can impact your health. And your diet is one of the key factors to staying healthy. I have found that doctors support including protein drinks in an older adult’s diet as long as it is part of a well-balanced nutrition program.

How do I know so much about this? Because my parents in the picture above have been including protein drinks in their diet for years. And they have talked with several dietitians and doctors over the years and have always heard that the drinks were good for them.

If you would like to know more about what program has been so successful in helping my parents stay healthy as they get older, send me a message from the contact page. Or you can also send me a message if you are on Twitter. I am @2healthylife on there.

Have a healthy week!

Tom