Blog

Training in Uncertainty

Source http://zenhabits.net/uncertain/

“We are always in transition. If you can just relax with that, you’ll have no problem.” -Chogyam Trungpa

By Leo Babauta

I’ve been training in uncertainty for a few years now.

I realized that the people I coach and teach are just like me: we feel shaky, scared, anxious, uncomfortable when we are faced with massive uncertainty, when the ground is pulled out from under our feet.

This shakiness is the cause of our procrastination, hiding from overwhelming projects, running from discomfort, and putting off exercise, healthy eating, meditation, writing, reading and all the other things we want in our lives.

And so, if we can train in uncertainty, we can get good at life. We no longer need to fear groundlessness.

What does it mean to train in uncertainty?

It means to constantly yank the rug out from under your feet.

When you get comfortable with something, you have to give it up. When you think you know something, you have to toss it out. When you walk through life with concepts, you have to let those concepts go and see things with fresh eyes.

Most of us walk around thinking we know things — think about how often we think we know how everyone else should act. Training in uncertainty is letting go of the certainty that we know how everyone else should behave, and having no concepts.

Most of us walk around thinking we know what things around us are. We barely glance at the things we pass. Training in uncertainty is tossing all that out, and seeing things for the first time, full of curiosity.

Training in uncertainty is pushing into discomfort when you want to run to comfort. It’s going to an event that scares the crap out of you. It’s setting aside time to write every day even when you want to run like crazy from the writing.

And then when you think you know something about training in uncertainty … you throw that out too. You keep throwing everything away, and know nothing.

What you’re left with is just impermanence — constant flux. Groundlessness. A deeply interconnected world, without separation.

Train with me, in my Fearless Training Program. We’ll have the ground pulled out from under us together.

Source http://zenhabits.net/uncertain/

“We are always in transition. If you can just relax with that, you’ll have no problem.” -Chogyam Trungpa

By Leo Babauta

I’ve been training in uncertainty for a few years now.

I realized that the people I coach and teach are just like me: we feel shaky, scared, anxious, uncomfortable when we are faced with massive uncertainty, when the ground is pulled out from under our feet.

This shakiness is the cause of our procrastination, hiding from overwhelming projects, running from discomfort, and putting off exercise, healthy eating, meditation, writing, reading and all the other things we want in our lives.

And so, if we can train in uncertainty, we can get good at life. We no longer need to fear groundlessness.

What does it mean to train in uncertainty?

It means to constantly yank the rug out from under your feet.

When you get comfortable with something, you have to give it up. When you think you know something, you have to toss it out. When you walk through life with concepts, you have to let those concepts go and see things with fresh eyes.

Most of us walk around thinking we know things — think about how often we think we know how everyone else should act. Training in uncertainty is letting go of the certainty that we know how everyone else should behave, and having no concepts.

Most of us walk around thinking we know what things around us are. We barely glance at the things we pass. Training in uncertainty is tossing all that out, and seeing things for the first time, full of curiosity.

Training in uncertainty is pushing into discomfort when you want to run to comfort. It’s going to an event that scares the crap out of you. It’s setting aside time to write every day even when you want to run like crazy from the writing.

And then when you think you know something about training in uncertainty … you throw that out too. You keep throwing everything away, and know nothing.

What you’re left with is just impermanence — constant flux. Groundlessness. A deeply interconnected world, without separation.

Train with me, in my Fearless Training Program. We’ll have the ground pulled out from under us together.

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD: How to keep your heart 30 yrs younger, hunger induces risky eating behavior, and climate change makes oysters more dangerous

Source https://www.summertomato.com/for-the-love-of-food-how-to-keep-your-heart-30-yrs-younger-hunger-induces-risky-eating-behavior-and-climate-change-makes-oysters-more-dangerous

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. A few extra this week since I missed last week.

This week how to keep your heart 30 yrs younger, hunger induces risky eating behavior, and climate change makes oysters more dangerous.

Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us!

Too busy to read them all? Try this awesome free speed reading app to read at 300+ wpm. So neat!

I also share links on Twitter @summertomato and the Summer Tomato Facebook page. I’m very active on all these sites and would love to connect with you.

Links of the week

What inspired you this week?

Source https://www.summertomato.com/for-the-love-of-food-how-to-keep-your-heart-30-yrs-younger-hunger-induces-risky-eating-behavior-and-climate-change-makes-oysters-more-dangerous

Welcome to Friday’s For The Love of Food, Summer Tomato’s weekly link roundup. A few extra this week since I missed last week.

This week how to keep your heart 30 yrs younger, hunger induces risky eating behavior, and climate change makes oysters more dangerous.

Next week’s Mindful Meal Challenge will start again on Monday. Sign up now to join us!

Too busy to read them all? Try this awesome free speed reading app to read at 300+ wpm. So neat!

I also share links on Twitter @summertomato and the Summer Tomato Facebook page. I’m very active on all these sites and would love to connect with you.

Links of the week

What inspired you this week?

3 No Meat Athlete Resources for a Vegan Holiday Season

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NoMeatAthlete/~3/B60Gfof4usg/

winter morning running

There’s something about this time of year that brings out the best and the worst in me.

On the one hand, it’s almost Christmas! And who doesn’t love sitting by the tree surrounded by the people you love?

On the other hand…there’s also overcrowded shopping centers, hectic travel, and endless temptations to eat this holiday treat and skip that bitter-cold run.

But this year, I’m taking control of the holidays. I’m leaving my internal Grinch out in the snow and leaning into the season with jingle bells and all.

To help us all get into this holly jolly spirit, I’ve put together a list of my favorite No Meat Athlete resources that have advice, recipes, and gift ideas to help make this holiday great.

1. Not Just Another Gift Guide

Hands down the No Meat Athlete Radio episode I look forward to most each year is the holiday extravaganza. It started back in 2015 mostly as a way for us to share our officially unofficial No Meat Athlete gift guide, but it’s turned in to much more than that. Over the years we’ve explored health and fitness goals from the past year, habits around the new year, and holiday recipes and traditions.

Plus, it’s a good excuse for me to make fun of Matt’s daily Christmas movie habit.

Listen to this year’s episode here:

Or click here to check out the show on iTunes.

2. (Mostly) Healthy Recipes Even Non-Vegans Will Love

Big holiday meals are always a source of anxiety for me. I love to cook, and I love finding vegan versions or interpretations of the meals my family cooked growing up, but there’s always the issue of all the non-vegans at the family dinner.

People love their traditions, and forcing my mother or grandmother to give up a dish they’ve been cooking every Christmas for decades isn’t something I’m interested in doing.

So I search for balance. What dishes can we easily make vegan that no one will notice? Or what can I add to the meal that will satisfy my wife and daughter without making a big deal out of the shrimp and grits my mom is cooking?

Typically I focus on the sides and appetizers, since that’s often an easy sell to the larger family and just as enjoyable for me. And that’s what I recommend if you’re new to the plant-based diet or dealing with tough family dynamics.

But this year I’m also introducing new main dishes:

  • For brunch, there’s this vegan breakfast casserole from Sweet Simple Vegan, which happens to be a perfect play on the casserole I ate on Christmas morning growing up. (I actually already made this for a holiday brunch with my mom and we all loved it.)
  • And for Christmas dinner I’ll be trying out this Chickpea Spinach Pie from Vegan Richa. This one is already NMA Team approved, since I know a few people cooked it on Thanksgiving.

Some of the team is also testing out a few new recipes this year:

  • Matt will be whipping up vegan tortilla de patatas from Danza de Fogones (heads up, the recipe is in Spanish) and these beignets for Christmas morning.
  • Andrew will make one of his favorites: Minimalist Baker’s vegan biscuits and gravy, along with some grapefruit mimosas with grapefruit juice and Stiegl’s Grapefruit Radler.
  • Susan’s big meal comes on Christmas Eve, and this year she’s cooking up a batch of vegan tamales.

For more inspiration on everything from brunch to desserts and cocktails, check out some of the the team’s favorites here:

17 Delicious Plant-Based Recipes to Get You Through the Holidays

3. The Four Fs of Surviving the Holidays

And finally, I want to leave you with this:

The Vegan Athlete’s Guide to Surviving the Holidays (And Still Having Fun)

It’s a fun little guide I put together a few years ago on how to stay fit, healthy, and happy, even during holiday party season.

So all those anxieties I mentioned in the beginning don’t come to fruition.

And with that, I wish you a happy holiday season. Full of cheer, workouts, and vegan treats.

Chat soon,

Doug

The post 3 No Meat Athlete Resources for a Vegan Holiday Season appeared first on No Meat Athlete.

Source http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/NoMeatAthlete/~3/B60Gfof4usg/

winter morning running

There’s something about this time of year that brings out the best and the worst in me.

On the one hand, it’s almost Christmas! And who doesn’t love sitting by the tree surrounded by the people you love?

On the other hand…there’s also overcrowded shopping centers, hectic travel, and endless temptations to eat this holiday treat and skip that bitter-cold run.

But this year, I’m taking control of the holidays. I’m leaving my internal Grinch out in the snow and leaning into the season with jingle bells and all.

To help us all get into this holly jolly spirit, I’ve put together a list of my favorite No Meat Athlete resources that have advice, recipes, and gift ideas to help make this holiday great.

1. Not Just Another Gift Guide

Hands down the No Meat Athlete Radio episode I look forward to most each year is the holiday extravaganza. It started back in 2015 mostly as a way for us to share our officially unofficial No Meat Athlete gift guide, but it’s turned in to much more than that. Over the years we’ve explored health and fitness goals from the past year, habits around the new year, and holiday recipes and traditions.

Plus, it’s a good excuse for me to make fun of Matt’s daily Christmas movie habit.

Listen to this year’s episode here:

Or click here to check out the show on iTunes.

2. (Mostly) Healthy Recipes Even Non-Vegans Will Love

Big holiday meals are always a source of anxiety for me. I love to cook, and I love finding vegan versions or interpretations of the meals my family cooked growing up, but there’s always the issue of all the non-vegans at the family dinner.

People love their traditions, and forcing my mother or grandmother to give up a dish they’ve been cooking every Christmas for decades isn’t something I’m interested in doing.

So I search for balance. What dishes can we easily make vegan that no one will notice? Or what can I add to the meal that will satisfy my wife and daughter without making a big deal out of the shrimp and grits my mom is cooking?

Typically I focus on the sides and appetizers, since that’s often an easy sell to the larger family and just as enjoyable for me. And that’s what I recommend if you’re new to the plant-based diet or dealing with tough family dynamics.

But this year I’m also introducing new main dishes:

  • For brunch, there’s this vegan breakfast casserole from Sweet Simple Vegan, which happens to be a perfect play on the casserole I ate on Christmas morning growing up. (I actually already made this for a holiday brunch with my mom and we all loved it.)
  • And for Christmas dinner I’ll be trying out this Chickpea Spinach Pie from Vegan Richa. This one is already NMA Team approved, since I know a few people cooked it on Thanksgiving.

Some of the team is also testing out a few new recipes this year:

  • Matt will be whipping up vegan tortilla de patatas from Danza de Fogones (heads up, the recipe is in Spanish) and these beignets for Christmas morning.
  • Andrew will make one of his favorites: Minimalist Baker’s vegan biscuits and gravy, along with some grapefruit mimosas with grapefruit juice and Stiegl’s Grapefruit Radler.
  • Susan’s big meal comes on Christmas Eve, and this year she’s cooking up a batch of vegan tamales.

For more inspiration on everything from brunch to desserts and cocktails, check out some of the the team’s favorites here:

17 Delicious Plant-Based Recipes to Get You Through the Holidays

3. The Four Fs of Surviving the Holidays

And finally, I want to leave you with this:

The Vegan Athlete’s Guide to Surviving the Holidays (And Still Having Fun)

It’s a fun little guide I put together a few years ago on how to stay fit, healthy, and happy, even during holiday party season.

So all those anxieties I mentioned in the beginning don’t come to fruition.

And with that, I wish you a happy holiday season. Full of cheer, workouts, and vegan treats.

Chat soon,

Doug

The post 3 No Meat Athlete Resources for a Vegan Holiday Season appeared first on No Meat Athlete.

The 2018 Farm Bill: More of the Same Old Same Old

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2018/12/the-2018-farm-bill-more-of-the-same-old-same-old/

I’m on record as calling previous Farm Bills “visionless.”

Given what’s happening in Congress, some consider it a bipartisan win?  It is, but only because, as the Washington Post put it, the outcome is bad but could have been a lot worse.

The 2018 Farm Bill remains a visionless mess.  It continues to favor Big Agriculture and mean-spiritedness over what this country badly needs: a food system explicitly aimed at promoting public health, basic support for the poor, the livelihoods of real farmers and farm workers, and environmental sustainability.

The bill takes up 807 pages, with a table of contents of 11 pages.  It will cost taxpayers $867 billion over ten years. That’s more than $1 billion per page.

How to approach the Farm Bill

Start by using the search function to look for key words.  These turn up in the Table of Contents, which gives section numbers.  Then search by section number.  Items dealing with sustainable agriculture and production of food—as opposed to feed or fuel—generally turn up in the Horticulture title.  For the rationale behind these decisions, see the Senate’s explanation.

Items of immediate note:

SNAP

Recall that more than 75% of Farm Bill expenditures go for SNAP—The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps).

The “bipartisan win”? Attempts to cut SNAP expenditures and introduce work requirements failed to pass (whew), although Congress is still working on ways to cut enrollments.

Commodity payments

The bill allows payments to more distant relatives of farm owners—cousins, nieces, nephews—a gift to the already rich.  Payments can still go to those earning more than $900,000 a year in adjusted gross income (sigh).

Organics

The bill authorizes $395 million in research funding over the next 10 years, and small amounts for data collection, offset of certification costs, and technology upgrades.  But the bill weakens restrictions on chemicals that can be used in organic production.

Hemp

The bill grants $2 million a year for support of hemp as a crop, and authorizes USDA to study the economic viability of its domestic production and sale.  It also authorizes Indian tribes (that’s the term the bill uses) to grow hemp.

Cuba

The bill allows funding for USDA trade promotion programs in Cuba.

The Managers recognize that expanding trade with Cuba not only represents an opportunity for American farmers and ranchers, but also a chance to improve engagement with the Cuban people in support of democratic ideas and human rights…The Managers expect that the Secretary will work closely with eligible trade organizations to educate them about allowable activities to improve exports to Cuba under the Market Access and Foreign Market Development Cooperator Programs.

One sweet gift: in memory of Gus Schumacher

The Managers also agree the FINI [Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive]  and Produce Prescription should be renamed the Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Program, in recognition of Mr. Schumacher’s role in the establishment of nutrition incentives nationwide. Mr. Schumacher was a magnificent advocate for farmers and families and saw the importance in building access and affordability through incentive programs.

Commentary

Dan Imhoff’s analysis in Civil Eats is particularly worth reading:

Still, the revised farm bill will ensure that citizens continue to pay for their food at least three times: 1) at the checkout stand; 2) in environmental cleanup and medical costs related to the consequences of industrial agriculture; and 3) as taxpayers who fund subsidies to a small group of commodity farmers deemed too big to fail.

FERN’s explainer video is also worth another look.

Documents

Source https://www.foodpolitics.com/2018/12/the-2018-farm-bill-more-of-the-same-old-same-old/

I’m on record as calling previous Farm Bills “visionless.”

Given what’s happening in Congress, some consider it a bipartisan win?  It is, but only because, as the Washington Post put it, the outcome is bad but could have been a lot worse.

The 2018 Farm Bill remains a visionless mess.  It continues to favor Big Agriculture and mean-spiritedness over what this country badly needs: a food system explicitly aimed at promoting public health, basic support for the poor, the livelihoods of real farmers and farm workers, and environmental sustainability.

The bill takes up 807 pages, with a table of contents of 11 pages.  It will cost taxpayers $867 billion over ten years. That’s more than $1 billion per page.

How to approach the Farm Bill

Start by using the search function to look for key words.  These turn up in the Table of Contents, which gives section numbers.  Then search by section number.  Items dealing with sustainable agriculture and production of food—as opposed to feed or fuel—generally turn up in the Horticulture title.  For the rationale behind these decisions, see the Senate’s explanation.

Items of immediate note:

SNAP

Recall that more than 75% of Farm Bill expenditures go for SNAP—The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly Food Stamps).

The “bipartisan win”? Attempts to cut SNAP expenditures and introduce work requirements failed to pass (whew), although Congress is still working on ways to cut enrollments.

Commodity payments

The bill allows payments to more distant relatives of farm owners—cousins, nieces, nephews—a gift to the already rich.  Payments can still go to those earning more than $900,000 a year in adjusted gross income (sigh).

Organics

The bill authorizes $395 million in research funding over the next 10 years, and small amounts for data collection, offset of certification costs, and technology upgrades.  But the bill weakens restrictions on chemicals that can be used in organic production.

Hemp

The bill grants $2 million a year for support of hemp as a crop, and authorizes USDA to study the economic viability of its domestic production and sale.  It also authorizes Indian tribes (that’s the term the bill uses) to grow hemp.

Cuba

The bill allows funding for USDA trade promotion programs in Cuba.

The Managers recognize that expanding trade with Cuba not only represents an opportunity for American farmers and ranchers, but also a chance to improve engagement with the Cuban people in support of democratic ideas and human rights…The Managers expect that the Secretary will work closely with eligible trade organizations to educate them about allowable activities to improve exports to Cuba under the Market Access and Foreign Market Development Cooperator Programs.

One sweet gift: in memory of Gus Schumacher

The Managers also agree the FINI [Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive]  and Produce Prescription should be renamed the Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Program, in recognition of Mr. Schumacher’s role in the establishment of nutrition incentives nationwide. Mr. Schumacher was a magnificent advocate for farmers and families and saw the importance in building access and affordability through incentive programs.

Commentary

Dan Imhoff’s analysis in Civil Eats is particularly worth reading:

Still, the revised farm bill will ensure that citizens continue to pay for their food at least three times: 1) at the checkout stand; 2) in environmental cleanup and medical costs related to the consequences of industrial agriculture; and 3) as taxpayers who fund subsidies to a small group of commodity farmers deemed too big to fail.

FERN’s explainer video is also worth another look.

Documents

Dr. Rhonda Patrick – Why Eating Fish, But Not Omega-3 Supplements, Can Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Source https://www.summertomato.com/dr-rhonda-patrick-why-eating-fish-but-not-omega-3-supplements-can-help-prevent-alzheimers-disease

Dr. Rhonda Patrick is a scientist who has done extensive research on aging, cancer and nutrition. She has a Ph.D. in biomedical science from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and St. Jude’s children’s Research
Hospital in Memphis TN, a bachelor’s of science degree in biochemistry/chemistry from the University of California San Diego and has trained as a postdoc at the Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute with Dr. Bruce Ames. Her research on the role of insulin signaling in protein misfolding commonly found in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, was conducted at the prestigious Salk Institute for Biological Sciences.

Rhonda’s podcast and website, both called Found My Fitness, discuss topics such as the role of micronutrient deficiencies in diseases of aging, the benefits of exposing the body to hormetic stressors such as exercise, fasting, sauna use or various forms of cold exposure, and the importance of mindfulness, stress reduction and sleep on health.

In this episode we discuss Rhonda’s new publication on the role of the APOE4 gene in Alzheimer’s Disease, and why eating fish but not taking fish oil DHA supplements help slow the progression of the disease for carriers. We also touch on how we both approach healthy pregnancies and Rhonda’s personal nutrition strategies.

 

Related Links:

iWi Algae-based omega-3 phospholipids  – fact sheet

 

Listen:

Listen on iTunes

Listen on Stitcher

Listen on Soundcloud

 

 

Show details (links don’t work on mobile devices): 

3:21 – How Rhonda helped Darya get pregnant the first time.

6:55 – Apparently, daily sauna use is not a good form of birth control.

9:21 – The APOE-4 gene––what it is and why it matters.

18:42 – Why getting good sleep is crucial for lowering an APOE-4 gene carrier’s risk for developing Alzheimer’s.

21:30 – Rhonda’s new publication explains how omega-3 DHA is transmitted to the brain differently in people who carry this gene.

24:08 – Eating fish versus taking fish oil DHA supplements.

27:26 – Why caviar isn’t just for special occasions.

31:07 – Why supplement companies have to distill fish oil, the downside of purified fish oil and what Rhonda suggests instead.

34:30 – It’s OK to eat fish roe when you are pregnant, just find a trusted source.

36:57 – How much fish should I be consuming on a weekly basis?

38:07 – An alternative source of omega-3 DHA for vegetarians.

41:35 – How to find out if you are a APOE-4 gene carrier.

45:27 – Engage in this type of exercise to lower your risk of Alzheimer’s, improve deep sleep and keep your brain healthy.

46:43 – How accurate is the Oura Ring for tracking sleep? + The difference between REM sleep and deep sleep.

49:26 – Rhonda’s nutrition strategy.

53:23 – Why she chooses Vital Choice Salmon….

54:15 – and focuses on certain nutrients more than others.

57:30 – Why Darya is skeptical of functional foods.

58:59 – Things to avoid during pregnancy.

1:03:21 – Is it safe to consume detoxifying foods when you are pregnant?

1:06:13 – Find Dr. Rhonda Patrick on the Found My Fitness podcast, www.foundmyfitness.com and @foundmyfitness on social media.

Source https://www.summertomato.com/dr-rhonda-patrick-why-eating-fish-but-not-omega-3-supplements-can-help-prevent-alzheimers-disease

Dr. Rhonda Patrick is a scientist who has done extensive research on aging, cancer and nutrition. She has a Ph.D. in biomedical science from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and St. Jude’s children’s Research
Hospital in Memphis TN, a bachelor’s of science degree in biochemistry/chemistry from the University of California San Diego and has trained as a postdoc at the Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute with Dr. Bruce Ames. Her research on the role of insulin signaling in protein misfolding commonly found in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, was conducted at the prestigious Salk Institute for Biological Sciences.

Rhonda’s podcast and website, both called Found My Fitness, discuss topics such as the role of micronutrient deficiencies in diseases of aging, the benefits of exposing the body to hormetic stressors such as exercise, fasting, sauna use or various forms of cold exposure, and the importance of mindfulness, stress reduction and sleep on health.

In this episode we discuss Rhonda’s new publication on the role of the APOE4 gene in Alzheimer’s Disease, and why eating fish but not taking fish oil DHA supplements help slow the progression of the disease for carriers. We also touch on how we both approach healthy pregnancies and Rhonda’s personal nutrition strategies.

 

Related Links:

iWi Algae-based omega-3 phospholipids  – fact sheet

 

Listen:

Listen on iTunes

Listen on Stitcher

Listen on Soundcloud

 

 

Show details (links don’t work on mobile devices): 

3:21 – How Rhonda helped Darya get pregnant the first time.

6:55 – Apparently, daily sauna use is not a good form of birth control.

9:21 – The APOE-4 gene––what it is and why it matters.

18:42 – Why getting good sleep is crucial for lowering an APOE-4 gene carrier’s risk for developing Alzheimer’s.

21:30 – Rhonda’s new publication explains how omega-3 DHA is transmitted to the brain differently in people who carry this gene.

24:08 – Eating fish versus taking fish oil DHA supplements.

27:26 – Why caviar isn’t just for special occasions.

31:07 – Why supplement companies have to distill fish oil, the downside of purified fish oil and what Rhonda suggests instead.

34:30 – It’s OK to eat fish roe when you are pregnant, just find a trusted source.

36:57 – How much fish should I be consuming on a weekly basis?

38:07 – An alternative source of omega-3 DHA for vegetarians.

41:35 – How to find out if you are a APOE-4 gene carrier.

45:27 – Engage in this type of exercise to lower your risk of Alzheimer’s, improve deep sleep and keep your brain healthy.

46:43 – How accurate is the Oura Ring for tracking sleep? + The difference between REM sleep and deep sleep.

49:26 – Rhonda’s nutrition strategy.

53:23 – Why she chooses Vital Choice Salmon….

54:15 – and focuses on certain nutrients more than others.

57:30 – Why Darya is skeptical of functional foods.

58:59 – Things to avoid during pregnancy.

1:03:21 – Is it safe to consume detoxifying foods when you are pregnant?

1:06:13 – Find Dr. Rhonda Patrick on the Found My Fitness podcast, www.foundmyfitness.com and @foundmyfitness on social media.

The Metabolism Myth: Why Exercise Alone Won't Help Weight Loss

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/metabolism-myths-weight-loss.html

In Tanzania, members of the Hadza tribe hunt their food with simple tools and build their huts from mud; working day and night for survival, they must burn a lot of calories, right? … Surprisingl……

Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/metabolism-myths-weight-loss.html

In Tanzania, members of the Hadza tribe hunt their food with simple tools and build their huts from mud; working day and night for survival, they must burn a lot of calories, right? … Surprisingl……

The Weirdness of Dementia (and Life)

Source https://changingaging.org/dementia/the-weirdness-of-dementia/

Over the last two years, my East Side Institute colleague Dr. Susan Massad and I have had the honor of leading “The Joy of Dementia” workshops around the country. One former college professor whose diagnosis was still recent, began sharing the experiences and emotions she was going through, and ended by saying, “What can I say, it’s just weird.”

The post The Weirdness of Dementia (and Life) appeared first on ChangingAging.

Source https://changingaging.org/dementia/the-weirdness-of-dementia/

Over the last two years, my East Side Institute colleague Dr. Susan Massad and I have had the honor of leading “The Joy of Dementia” workshops around the country. One former college professor whose diagnosis was still recent, began sharing the experiences and emotions she was going through, and ended by saying, “What can I say, it’s just weird.”

The post The Weirdness of Dementia (and Life) appeared first on ChangingAging.

Podcast 163 | Business

Source https://www.theminimalists.com/p163/

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan are joined by Jordan Harbinger to talk about what it takes to start a successful small business, and they answer the following questions:

  • When is it acceptable to take on debt to expand my business?
  • How do I run a minimalist business and still earn a living wage?
  • How do I establish a work-life balance when starting a business?
  • How do I overcome the fear of failure to migrate from corporate cog to owner-operator?

Video Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Spotify · Google Play · Soundcloud · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Don’t confuse hustle with productivity, creativity, or quality.” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Say ‘yes’ until you have to say ‘no,’ and then say ‘no’ until you have to say ‘yes.’” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Short-sighted entrepreneurs focus on hustling over adding value.” —Ryan Nicodemus
  • “Job security is a misnomer when your security is in someone else’s hands.” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Keep your day job until you’re the only one that’s stopping you from scaling on your side hustle.” —Jordan Harbinger
  • “Betting on an employer instead of yourself is playing the odds for disappointment.” —Ryan Nicodemus

Mentioned in This Episode

The post Podcast 163 | Business appeared first on The Minimalists.

Source https://www.theminimalists.com/p163/

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan are joined by Jordan Harbinger to talk about what it takes to start a successful small business, and they answer the following questions:

  • When is it acceptable to take on debt to expand my business?
  • How do I run a minimalist business and still earn a living wage?
  • How do I establish a work-life balance when starting a business?
  • How do I overcome the fear of failure to migrate from corporate cog to owner-operator?

Video Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Spotify · Google Play · Soundcloud · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Don’t confuse hustle with productivity, creativity, or quality.” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Say ‘yes’ until you have to say ‘no,’ and then say ‘no’ until you have to say ‘yes.’” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Short-sighted entrepreneurs focus on hustling over adding value.” —Ryan Nicodemus
  • “Job security is a misnomer when your security is in someone else’s hands.” —Joshua Fields Millburn
  • “Keep your day job until you’re the only one that’s stopping you from scaling on your side hustle.” —Jordan Harbinger
  • “Betting on an employer instead of yourself is playing the odds for disappointment.” —Ryan Nicodemus

Mentioned in This Episode

The post Podcast 163 | Business appeared first on The Minimalists.

Does Open Heart Surgery Affect Cognitive Abilities?

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/does-open-heart-surgery-affect-cognitive-abilities/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Most people who need open heart surgery to repair damaged heart valves are aged 65 or older. The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that nearly 8 million people have had heart surgeries. However, we don’t fully understand the effects of heart surgery on an older adult’s cognition (the ability to remember, think, and make decisions).

In 2014, an estimated 156,000 heart valve surgeries were performed in the US. The most common condition for valve surgery was aortic stenosis. The aorta is the heart valve that controls blood flow from your heart to the rest of your body. Aortic stenosis occurs when the aortic valve doesn’t allow blood to flow out of the heart properly. Adults 65 and older represent most of the people who need aortic valve surgery, and the number of older adults with aortic stenosis is expected to double by 2050.

Understanding how heart valve surgery may affect your cognition is important for older adults. To learn more, researchers reviewed studies to see how patients’ cognition changed before and after heart valve surgery. They also looked at whether surgeries on two types of heart valves, the mitral or the aortic, were associated with better or worse outcomes. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

To learn more, researchers reviewed 12 studies that included hundreds of people who had heart valve surgery. In each of the studies, participants had been tested before and after surgery to determine their ability to remember, think, and make decisions.

The researchers found that within the first month after valve surgery, people in the studies experienced some cognitive decline compared to before the surgery. Up to six months after surgery, patients’ cognitive health had largely returned to normal. One-third of the studies included in this review even found small improvements in cognition half a year after surgery.

The researchers also learned that aortic valve surgery was associated with more early cognitive problems than mitral valve surgery.

People who had mitral valve surgery experienced a mild decline from their one-month check-up to their check-ups from two to six months after surgery. But people who had aortic valve surgery experienced poorer cognitive function the month after surgery, although they tended to improve after that.

Importantly, the researchers also learned that aortic valve patients were, on average, a decade older than mitral valve patients (68 years vs. 57). Because the people who had aortic valve surgeries were older, their increased age might have affected their cognitive decline.

The researchers concluded that heart valve surgery patients are at risk of cognitive problems up to six months after surgery. People having aortic valve surgery—the majority of whom are older adults—are at greater risk of early cognitive decline within the first month after surgery than people having mitral valve surgery. However, cognitive health in both groups appears largely to return to what it was before surgery within the six months after surgery.

 This summary is from “Cognitive outcomes after heart valve surgery.” It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Mark A. Oldham, MD; Jacqueline Vachon, MSc; David Yuh, MD; and Hochang B. Lee, MD.

Source http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/does-open-heart-surgery-affect-cognitive-abilities/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Most people who need open heart surgery to repair damaged heart valves are aged 65 or older. The American Heart Association (AHA) estimates that nearly 8 million people have had heart surgeries. However, we don’t fully understand the effects of heart surgery on an older adult’s cognition (the ability to remember, think, and make decisions).

In 2014, an estimated 156,000 heart valve surgeries were performed in the US. The most common condition for valve surgery was aortic stenosis. The aorta is the heart valve that controls blood flow from your heart to the rest of your body. Aortic stenosis occurs when the aortic valve doesn’t allow blood to flow out of the heart properly. Adults 65 and older represent most of the people who need aortic valve surgery, and the number of older adults with aortic stenosis is expected to double by 2050.

Understanding how heart valve surgery may affect your cognition is important for older adults. To learn more, researchers reviewed studies to see how patients’ cognition changed before and after heart valve surgery. They also looked at whether surgeries on two types of heart valves, the mitral or the aortic, were associated with better or worse outcomes. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

To learn more, researchers reviewed 12 studies that included hundreds of people who had heart valve surgery. In each of the studies, participants had been tested before and after surgery to determine their ability to remember, think, and make decisions.

The researchers found that within the first month after valve surgery, people in the studies experienced some cognitive decline compared to before the surgery. Up to six months after surgery, patients’ cognitive health had largely returned to normal. One-third of the studies included in this review even found small improvements in cognition half a year after surgery.

The researchers also learned that aortic valve surgery was associated with more early cognitive problems than mitral valve surgery.

People who had mitral valve surgery experienced a mild decline from their one-month check-up to their check-ups from two to six months after surgery. But people who had aortic valve surgery experienced poorer cognitive function the month after surgery, although they tended to improve after that.

Importantly, the researchers also learned that aortic valve patients were, on average, a decade older than mitral valve patients (68 years vs. 57). Because the people who had aortic valve surgeries were older, their increased age might have affected their cognitive decline.

The researchers concluded that heart valve surgery patients are at risk of cognitive problems up to six months after surgery. People having aortic valve surgery—the majority of whom are older adults—are at greater risk of early cognitive decline within the first month after surgery than people having mitral valve surgery. However, cognitive health in both groups appears largely to return to what it was before surgery within the six months after surgery.

 This summary is from “Cognitive outcomes after heart valve surgery.” It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Mark A. Oldham, MD; Jacqueline Vachon, MSc; David Yuh, MD; and Hochang B. Lee, MD.

On Mental Health and the advent of Digital Phenotyping

Source: https://sharpbrains.com/blog/2018/12/04/on-mental-health-and-the-advent-of-digital-phenotyping/

___

Building the Thermometer for Mental Health (The Dana Foundation):

“Imagine that you visit your physician complaining of a fever and, rather than taking out a thermometer, they begin hovering their “educated hands” over you. Gradually, they press down against your arm to gain a full impression of your skin’s temperature and the “deeper seated combustions.” Removing their hand, they look closely at your appearance and pronounce their assessment: you do, in fact, have a fever. You might (justifiably) be dubious

Just as the thermometer provided a standardized, objective measurement for detecting fever, tools …

Source: https://sharpbrains.com/blog/2018/12/04/on-mental-health-and-the-advent-of-digital-phenotyping/

___

Building the Thermometer for Mental Health (The Dana Foundation):

“Imagine that you visit your physician complaining of a fever and, rather than taking out a thermometer, they begin hovering their “educated hands” over you. Gradually, they press down against your arm to gain a full impression of your skin’s temperature and the “deeper seated combustions.” Removing their hand, they look closely at your appearance and pronounce their assessment: you do, in fact, have a fever. You might (justifiably) be dubious

Just as the thermometer provided a standardized, objective measurement for detecting fever, tools …