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Try This: Olive That!

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/try-new-olive-that/

The Mediterranean Diet and the MIND Diet – which stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay – are styles of eating that have been shown to promote brain vitality, improve cognition and reduce the risk of dementia. Both dietary eating styles include many brain healthy superfoods packed with Omega-3s, healthy fats and antioxidants.

Olive oil is a significant part of the Mediterranean diet. Regularly eating foods associated with the Mediterranean style cuisine has been shown to increase brain vi…

Source: https://totalbrainhealth.com/try-new-olive-that/

The Mediterranean Diet and the MIND Diet – which stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay – are styles of eating that have been shown to promote brain vitality, improve cognition and reduce the risk of dementia. Both dietary eating styles include many brain healthy superfoods packed with Omega-3s, healthy fats and antioxidants.

Olive oil is a significant part of the Mediterranean diet. Regularly eating foods associated with the Mediterranean style cuisine has been shown to increase brain vi…

Blood Biomarkers Plus Gene Status May Predict Cognitive Decline

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/think-outside-the-box/blood-biomarkers-plus-gene-status-may-predict-cognitive-decline

by Richard Robinson for Neurology Today: Using a machine-learning approach, investigators identified four plasma proteins that correlate with cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-beta-1-42 status; these proteins plus apolipoprotein E4 genotype predicted amyloid positivity. Levels of four blood proteins, when combined with apolipoprotein……

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/think-outside-the-box/blood-biomarkers-plus-gene-status-may-predict-cognitive-decline

by Richard Robinson for Neurology Today: Using a machine-learning approach, investigators identified four plasma proteins that correlate with cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-beta-1-42 status; these proteins plus apolipoprotein E4 genotype predicted amyloid positivity. Levels of four blood proteins, when combined with apolipoprotein……

Eating Fish Oil May Help Reduce Asthma Risk 70%

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/eating-fish-oil-may-help-reduce-asthma-risk-70/

The study found that “certain types of n-3 (from marine oils) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of having asthma or asthma-like symptoms by up to 62 per cent, while high n-6 consumption (from vegetable oils) was associated with an increased risk by up to 67 per cent,” said Andreas Lopata, Professor from the

Read More…

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/eating-fish-oil-may-help-reduce-asthma-risk-70/

The study found that “certain types of n-3 (from marine oils) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of having asthma or asthma-like symptoms by up to 62 per cent, while high n-6 consumption (from vegetable oils) was associated with an increased risk by up to 67 per cent,” said Andreas Lopata, Professor from the

Read More…

Omega 3 For Muscle Recovery

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/omega-3-for-muscle-recovery/

Researchers of the study published in FASEB Journal says that the fatty acid may help in muscle repair and body recovery. The study included a sample of 20 healthy young women divided into two groups. One group took a dose of 5-grams of sunflower oil while the other took a dose of omega 3s. The participants

Read More…

Source: http://www.brainhealtheducation.org/omega-3-for-muscle-recovery/

Researchers of the study published in FASEB Journal says that the fatty acid may help in muscle repair and body recovery. The study included a sample of 20 healthy young women divided into two groups. One group took a dose of 5-grams of sunflower oil while the other took a dose of omega 3s. The participants

Read More…

How the CARE Act Can Help Family Caregivers After a Hospital Discharge

Source https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/care-act-can-help-family-caregivers-after-a-hospital-discharge/

In the United States, 40 states have enacted a law to help family caregivers care for their parents or senior loved ones after a hospital discharge. The law is called the CARE Act – but what is the act and how can caregivers get access to it?How the CARE Act Can Help Family Caregivers After a Hospital Discharge

Learn more about the CARE Act and how it can help caregivers after a loved one’s hospitalization or rehabilitation facility stay.

The CARE Act

The CARE (Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable) Act was enacted to help the growing number of family caregivers bridge the gap between medical procedures in the hospital and the hospital discharge to home.

In other words, the CARE Act helps caregivers know what to do and how to do it after a parent or senior loved one’s hospitalization.

The CARE Act requires that hospitals and rehabilitation facilities:

  1. Inform the family caregiver in advance when a loved one will be discharged from a hospital/rehabilitation facility to another facility or discharged to home.
  2. Keep on record the contact information and name of the family caregiver at the hospital or rehabilitation center the loved one is admitted to.
  3. Provide teaching (including an explanation and live instruction) to family caregivers about any type of medical tasks — such as how to transfer the patient, medication management and wound care, etc. — that the caregiver will need to do, once a loved one is discharged from the hospital.

Ways the CARE Act Helps Caregivers After a Hospital Discharge

According to an AARP report, approximately 34.2 million Americans have provided unpaid care to an adult age 50 or older in the past 12 months.

Today’s family caregivers manage a wide range of complex medical procedures that once was reserved only for professional doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists, including:

  • Administering injectable medications
  • Administering medications
  • Managing prescribed diets
  • Operating specialized equipment or health monitoring devices
  • Providing wound care

Most caregivers don’t feel confident performing some of the highly technical procedures that their loved ones need without any type of formal education. This is one reason that AARP proposed the CARE Act across the country.

There are currently 40 states in the U.S. (including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) that have adopted the CARE Act:

  1. Alaska
  2. Arkansas
  3. California
  4. Colorado
  5. Connecticut
  6. Delaware
  7. District of Columbia
  8. Hawaii
  9. Illinois
  10. Indiana
  11. Kansas
  12. Kentucky
  13. Louisiana
  14. Maine
  15. Maryland
  16. Massachusetts
  17. Michigan
  18. Minnesota
  19. Mississippi
  20. Missouri
  21. Montana
  22. Nebraska
  23. Nevada
  24. New Hampshire
  25. New Jersey
  26. New Mexico
  27. New York
  28. Ohio
  29. Oklahoma
  30. Oregon
  31. Pennsylvania
  32. Rhode Island
  33. Texas
  34. Utah
  35. Virginia
  36. Virgin Islands
  37. Washington
  38. West Virginia
  39. Wyoming
  40. Puerto Rico

States that are not listed above have not yet passed the CARE Act.

If you are one of the 40 million family caregivers in the U.S. who cares for an aging parent or senior loved one, you may already know how stressful a hospitalization can be. The CARE Act is a tool that AARP hopes will help caregivers, who need all the support they can get while caring for a loved one after a hospitalization or rehabilitation facility stay.

Has the CARE Act been passed in your state? What has your experience been like caring for a loved one after a hospital discharge? We’d like to hear your stories and thoughts in the comments below.

Related Articles:

Source https://www.aplaceformom.com/blog/care-act-can-help-family-caregivers-after-a-hospital-discharge/

In the United States, 40 states have enacted a law to help family caregivers care for their parents or senior loved ones after a hospital discharge. The law is called the CARE Act – but what is the act and how can caregivers get access to it?How the CARE Act Can Help Family Caregivers After a Hospital Discharge

Learn more about the CARE Act and how it can help caregivers after a loved one’s hospitalization or rehabilitation facility stay.

The CARE Act

The CARE (Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable) Act was enacted to help the growing number of family caregivers bridge the gap between medical procedures in the hospital and the hospital discharge to home.

In other words, the CARE Act helps caregivers know what to do and how to do it after a parent or senior loved one’s hospitalization.

The CARE Act requires that hospitals and rehabilitation facilities:

  1. Inform the family caregiver in advance when a loved one will be discharged from a hospital/rehabilitation facility to another facility or discharged to home.
  2. Keep on record the contact information and name of the family caregiver at the hospital or rehabilitation center the loved one is admitted to.
  3. Provide teaching (including an explanation and live instruction) to family caregivers about any type of medical tasks — such as how to transfer the patient, medication management and wound care, etc. — that the caregiver will need to do, once a loved one is discharged from the hospital.

Ways the CARE Act Helps Caregivers After a Hospital Discharge

According to an AARP report, approximately 34.2 million Americans have provided unpaid care to an adult age 50 or older in the past 12 months.

Today’s family caregivers manage a wide range of complex medical procedures that once was reserved only for professional doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists, including:

  • Administering injectable medications
  • Administering medications
  • Managing prescribed diets
  • Operating specialized equipment or health monitoring devices
  • Providing wound care

Most caregivers don’t feel confident performing some of the highly technical procedures that their loved ones need without any type of formal education. This is one reason that AARP proposed the CARE Act across the country.

There are currently 40 states in the U.S. (including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) that have adopted the CARE Act:

  1. Alaska
  2. Arkansas
  3. California
  4. Colorado
  5. Connecticut
  6. Delaware
  7. District of Columbia
  8. Hawaii
  9. Illinois
  10. Indiana
  11. Kansas
  12. Kentucky
  13. Louisiana
  14. Maine
  15. Maryland
  16. Massachusetts
  17. Michigan
  18. Minnesota
  19. Mississippi
  20. Missouri
  21. Montana
  22. Nebraska
  23. Nevada
  24. New Hampshire
  25. New Jersey
  26. New Mexico
  27. New York
  28. Ohio
  29. Oklahoma
  30. Oregon
  31. Pennsylvania
  32. Rhode Island
  33. Texas
  34. Utah
  35. Virginia
  36. Virgin Islands
  37. Washington
  38. West Virginia
  39. Wyoming
  40. Puerto Rico

States that are not listed above have not yet passed the CARE Act.

If you are one of the 40 million family caregivers in the U.S. who cares for an aging parent or senior loved one, you may already know how stressful a hospitalization can be. The CARE Act is a tool that AARP hopes will help caregivers, who need all the support they can get while caring for a loved one after a hospitalization or rehabilitation facility stay.

Has the CARE Act been passed in your state? What has your experience been like caring for a loved one after a hospital discharge? We’d like to hear your stories and thoughts in the comments below.

Related Articles:

For Older Women, Taking High Blood Pressure Medication May Not Raise Risk for Falls

Source https://www.healthinaging.org/blog/for-older-women-taking-high-blood-pressure-medication-may-not-raise-risk-for-falls/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) is the medical term for when the force of blood against your blood vessel walls is too high. We know that using medication to lower high blood pressure can prevent heart attacks and strokes. But healthcare professionals often worry that prescriptions for lowering high blood pressure can sometimes lower it too much. This can put you at risk for becoming dizzy and falling.

Falls are a serious problem in older adults. In 2014, falls caused 2.8 million emergency room visits, 800,000 hospitalizations, and 27,000 deaths, and cost Medicare an estimated $31.3 billion.

Although some healthcare experts suspect that taking high blood pressure medication over time is linked to falls and fractures, very little research supports that belief. In fact, at least two major studies examining blood pressure reduction did not find an increased risk for falls among people taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. Other studies have not shown an increase in fracture risk for people taking medication for high blood pressure—in fact, some studies suggest that high blood pressure medicines may actually reduce the risk for fractures.

Researchers decided to learn more about the links between falls, high blood pressure, and high blood pressure medication in older women. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The research team used information from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health (OPACH) study. This study was designed to examine the risk of falls for older women (aged 50 to 79) based on their high blood pressure status.  (High blood pressure is often defined as having a reading of 140 mmHg for your “systolic” blood pressure and 90 mmHg or higher for your “diastolic” blood pressure).

Among women with high blood pressure, the researchers looked at participants who did or did not take medication to control their condition. They also took note of the participants’ blood pressure readings over the course of the study.

5,971 women in the study received home visits. Most of the women were in their late 70s. During the visits, the participants had their blood pressure tested. They also were tested to measure their balance, walking speed, and their ability to stand from a seated position. The women also kept calendars for 13 months showing whether or not they had experienced a fall, or if they had come close to falling.

The researchers concluded there was no increased risk of falls among women who took high blood pressure medication compared to those whose blood pressure readings were normal.

In fact, women whose blood pressure was normal with medication had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of falls compared to women who didn’t have high blood pressure.

The researchers also concluded that taking medication to reduce high blood pressure was not linked to falls in older women. However, other researchers looking at studies with large numbers of participants have found that the risk of falls increased in the first several weeks after people began taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. The increased risk disappeared after the first several weeks.

The researchers suggested that healthcare practitioners measure blood pressure carefully in the office, and potentially have blood pressure measurements taken at home to confirm whether older women need to take medication to lower high blood pressure.

While the risk of a serious fall injury is low for women taking medication for high blood pressure, the researchers suggested that it makes sense to monitor patients for the first few weeks after starting a new medication to reduce high blood pressure—or after raising the dosage for a medication they’re already taking. The researchers said that for women who are doing well and tolerating a new prescription after the first several weeks, it seems likely that they can enjoy the long-term health benefits of better blood pressure control without an increased risk for falls.

 This summary is from “Hypertension Treatment & Falls in Older Women.” It appears online ahead of print in the December 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Karen L. Margolis, MD, MPH; David M. Buchner, MD, MPH; Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH; Yuzheng Zhang, MS; Chongzhi Di, PhD; Eileen Rillamas-Sun, PhD, MPH; Julie Hunt, PhD; Farha Ikramuddin; Wenjun Li; Steve Marshall, PhD; Dori Rosenberg, PhD, MPH; Marcia L. Stefanick, PhD; Robert Wallace; and Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD.

Source https://www.healthinaging.org/blog/for-older-women-taking-high-blood-pressure-medication-may-not-raise-risk-for-falls/

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) is the medical term for when the force of blood against your blood vessel walls is too high. We know that using medication to lower high blood pressure can prevent heart attacks and strokes. But healthcare professionals often worry that prescriptions for lowering high blood pressure can sometimes lower it too much. This can put you at risk for becoming dizzy and falling.

Falls are a serious problem in older adults. In 2014, falls caused 2.8 million emergency room visits, 800,000 hospitalizations, and 27,000 deaths, and cost Medicare an estimated $31.3 billion.

Although some healthcare experts suspect that taking high blood pressure medication over time is linked to falls and fractures, very little research supports that belief. In fact, at least two major studies examining blood pressure reduction did not find an increased risk for falls among people taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. Other studies have not shown an increase in fracture risk for people taking medication for high blood pressure—in fact, some studies suggest that high blood pressure medicines may actually reduce the risk for fractures.

Researchers decided to learn more about the links between falls, high blood pressure, and high blood pressure medication in older women. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The research team used information from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) Objective Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health (OPACH) study. This study was designed to examine the risk of falls for older women (aged 50 to 79) based on their high blood pressure status.  (High blood pressure is often defined as having a reading of 140 mmHg for your “systolic” blood pressure and 90 mmHg or higher for your “diastolic” blood pressure).

Among women with high blood pressure, the researchers looked at participants who did or did not take medication to control their condition. They also took note of the participants’ blood pressure readings over the course of the study.

5,971 women in the study received home visits. Most of the women were in their late 70s. During the visits, the participants had their blood pressure tested. They also were tested to measure their balance, walking speed, and their ability to stand from a seated position. The women also kept calendars for 13 months showing whether or not they had experienced a fall, or if they had come close to falling.

The researchers concluded there was no increased risk of falls among women who took high blood pressure medication compared to those whose blood pressure readings were normal.

In fact, women whose blood pressure was normal with medication had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of falls compared to women who didn’t have high blood pressure.

The researchers also concluded that taking medication to reduce high blood pressure was not linked to falls in older women. However, other researchers looking at studies with large numbers of participants have found that the risk of falls increased in the first several weeks after people began taking medication to reduce high blood pressure. The increased risk disappeared after the first several weeks.

The researchers suggested that healthcare practitioners measure blood pressure carefully in the office, and potentially have blood pressure measurements taken at home to confirm whether older women need to take medication to lower high blood pressure.

While the risk of a serious fall injury is low for women taking medication for high blood pressure, the researchers suggested that it makes sense to monitor patients for the first few weeks after starting a new medication to reduce high blood pressure—or after raising the dosage for a medication they’re already taking. The researchers said that for women who are doing well and tolerating a new prescription after the first several weeks, it seems likely that they can enjoy the long-term health benefits of better blood pressure control without an increased risk for falls.

 This summary is from “Hypertension Treatment & Falls in Older Women.” It appears online ahead of print in the December 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Karen L. Margolis, MD, MPH; David M. Buchner, MD, MPH; Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH; Yuzheng Zhang, MS; Chongzhi Di, PhD; Eileen Rillamas-Sun, PhD, MPH; Julie Hunt, PhD; Farha Ikramuddin; Wenjun Li; Steve Marshall, PhD; Dori Rosenberg, PhD, MPH; Marcia L. Stefanick, PhD; Robert Wallace; and Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD.

A possible blood test for early-stage Alzheimer’s disease

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/think-outside-the-box/a-possible-blood-test-for-early-stage-alzheimers-disease

by Bob Yirka for Medical XPress: A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across South Korea has developed a possible blood test to detect the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who have yet to……

Source: https://womensbrainhealth.org/think-outside-the-box/a-possible-blood-test-for-early-stage-alzheimers-disease

by Bob Yirka for Medical XPress: A large team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across South Korea has developed a possible blood test to detect the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease in patients who have yet to……

Medication Management: Preventing Future Health Problems

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/600008508/0/griswoldhomecare~Medication-Management-Preventing-Future-Health-Problems/

Senior Man Using Pill Box

Failing to take medications as prescribed is quite common, and quite dangerous. According to the CDC, adverse drug events lead older adults to visit the emergency room around 450,000 times per year. That’s largely because seniors take more medications than any other age group.
For those with memory problems, managing medications can be even more difficult. Some may fail to fill or refill a prescription, discontinue medication too early, or accidentally take the wrong dose. Fortunately, there are a number of things that can help make medication management a little bit easier.

What is Medication Management?

Medications can have complex interactions with a variety of different foods, supplements, and over the counter drugs. Medications also interact with other medications. With so many different moving parts, the importance of medication management should be clear. Not only can the efficacy of medications be affected, proper management is even a matter of life and death.
Consequently, choosing the right approach to medication management largely depends on an individual’s unique circumstances. How often do dosages change? How often do medications need to be taken? How important is any given medication? How many different healthcare professionals are prescribing medications? The answer to these questions can help inform the specific medication management solutions most suitable to an individual’s needs.

Medication Management Tips

When visiting the pharmacist or doctor, bring a list of medications, supplements, and over the counter drugs you use. Having more information makes it easier for health providers to identify possible negative effects or drug interactions. Keep that list up to date with the brand names, dosage being taken, and frequency of the dose.
Use as few providers and pharmacists as possible. Good communication between healthcare providers is essential for avoiding problems with drug interactions. Using multiple pharmacies means you’ll have to undergo an additional level of review to make sure dosages are appropriate and risks are minimized.
Don’t be afraid to talk to the pharmacist about how combinations of medications might interact, or other questions you might have. Pharmacists are often nearly as qualified as your physician to answer these questions.

Medication Management Systems for Seniors

Pill organizers are made in a variety of different forms, including the popular pill-calendar format. For pills that need to be taken in the morning or evening, you might use two separate pill organizers of different colors. And for pills that need to be taken at regular intervals, special pill bottles are constructed with built-in LCD clocks, which count down from the moment they were last opened.
Medication reminders are crucial. Alarm systems can also be useful reminders. With a voice assistant, smartphone, tablet, or similar device, it’s quite easy to setup some reminders along with timers. Likewise, involving medications into a routine can make them easier to remember. For instance, taking them shortly after brushing your teeth, or right after a meal.

When Self-Guided Medication Management Won’t Work

For older adults with minor memory problems, alarm systems or calendar systems can be handy. But if a loved one is suffering from a more severe cognitive impairment, it may not be safe for them to manage their own medications. Improperly taking medications can be dangerous or even lethal, which is why failing to take medications as prescribed can be a warning sign that a medication management care plan may be necessary. If you are interested in medication management services for seniors, contact your local Griswold Home Care office to discuss how caregivers can help with reminders.

Source https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/600008508/0/griswoldhomecare~Medication-Management-Preventing-Future-Health-Problems/

Senior Man Using Pill Box

Failing to take medications as prescribed is quite common, and quite dangerous. According to the CDC, adverse drug events lead older adults to visit the emergency room around 450,000 times per year. That’s largely because seniors take more medications than any other age group.
For those with memory problems, managing medications can be even more difficult. Some may fail to fill or refill a prescription, discontinue medication too early, or accidentally take the wrong dose. Fortunately, there are a number of things that can help make medication management a little bit easier.

What is Medication Management?

Medications can have complex interactions with a variety of different foods, supplements, and over the counter drugs. Medications also interact with other medications. With so many different moving parts, the importance of medication management should be clear. Not only can the efficacy of medications be affected, proper management is even a matter of life and death.
Consequently, choosing the right approach to medication management largely depends on an individual’s unique circumstances. How often do dosages change? How often do medications need to be taken? How important is any given medication? How many different healthcare professionals are prescribing medications? The answer to these questions can help inform the specific medication management solutions most suitable to an individual’s needs.

Medication Management Tips

When visiting the pharmacist or doctor, bring a list of medications, supplements, and over the counter drugs you use. Having more information makes it easier for health providers to identify possible negative effects or drug interactions. Keep that list up to date with the brand names, dosage being taken, and frequency of the dose.
Use as few providers and pharmacists as possible. Good communication between healthcare providers is essential for avoiding problems with drug interactions. Using multiple pharmacies means you’ll have to undergo an additional level of review to make sure dosages are appropriate and risks are minimized.
Don’t be afraid to talk to the pharmacist about how combinations of medications might interact, or other questions you might have. Pharmacists are often nearly as qualified as your physician to answer these questions.

Medication Management Systems for Seniors

Pill organizers are made in a variety of different forms, including the popular pill-calendar format. For pills that need to be taken in the morning or evening, you might use two separate pill organizers of different colors. And for pills that need to be taken at regular intervals, special pill bottles are constructed with built-in LCD clocks, which count down from the moment they were last opened.
Medication reminders are crucial. Alarm systems can also be useful reminders. With a voice assistant, smartphone, tablet, or similar device, it’s quite easy to setup some reminders along with timers. Likewise, involving medications into a routine can make them easier to remember. For instance, taking them shortly after brushing your teeth, or right after a meal.

When Self-Guided Medication Management Won’t Work

For older adults with minor memory problems, alarm systems or calendar systems can be handy. But if a loved one is suffering from a more severe cognitive impairment, it may not be safe for them to manage their own medications. Improperly taking medications can be dangerous or even lethal, which is why failing to take medications as prescribed can be a warning sign that a medication management care plan may be necessary. If you are interested in medication management services for seniors, contact your local Griswold Home Care office to discuss how caregivers can help with reminders.

I Love You for What You ALMOST Are, Person-Centeredness.

Source https://changingaging.org/culture-change/i-love-you-for-what-you-almost-are-person-centeredness/

I am worried. This is not surprising, as I tend to be somewhat of a worrywart. This is a quality I inherited from my grandmother and my mother, and I have worked really hard to perfect it. I like to think that worry can sometimes serve a useful purpose. For me, when worry festers, when […]

The post I Love You for What You ALMOST Are, Person-Centeredness. appeared first on ChangingAging.

Source https://changingaging.org/culture-change/i-love-you-for-what-you-almost-are-person-centeredness/

I am worried. This is not surprising, as I tend to be somewhat of a worrywart. This is a quality I inherited from my grandmother and my mother, and I have worked really hard to perfect it. I like to think that worry can sometimes serve a useful purpose. For me, when worry festers, when […]

The post I Love You for What You ALMOST Are, Person-Centeredness. appeared first on ChangingAging.